Peripheral Artery Disease: Donna Seaman’s Story

My name is Donna Seaman, and I’d like to share my story of Peripheral Artery Disease with you.

First—a little background for you: I’m from Massachusetts, and I’ve lived in Atlanta for over 35 years now. I attended Emory University and majored in business before becoming a buyer for Rich’s (now Macy’s). I enjoyed the best of both worlds in that I spent several years as both a working Mom, and several as a stay-at-home Mom. I live in Dunwoody, and I have two children—a 26-year-old daughter, and a 23-year-old son.

I’ve been playing tennis now for over 20 years, and once I hit my late 40s I began to notice some leg pain and swelling. At the time, I attributed it to normal wear and tear, and assumed it was also due to all of the years I spent on my feet working in the retail industry. When the pain worsened after about a year or so, I knew it was time to seek medical help.

When Dr. Niazi asked me if I was experiencing any other symptoms, I shared the fact that my tennis game had been really “off”, and that I had noticed that I was stumbling around more and feeling clumsier in general. I would also pick up items and unintentionally drop them. I didn’t think much of these particular symptoms, but the folks at Emory really took notice when they heard me mention them, and decided to run some more tests.

After the tests, Emory called me with the results and informed me that not only did I have peripheral artery disease in my legs, the carotid artery in my neck was 97% blocked. (My neck artery blockage was what was causing the stumbling and clumsiness.) Dr. Niazi immediately warned me not to have any neck rubs or massages, and to exercise caution when I was getting my hair washed at the salon or bending my neck. With 97% of the artery blocked, I was dangerously close to experiencing a stroke.

Initially, I had less invasive procedure that involved the physician going through my groin area and then up into my neck in order to place a stent. However, after reviewing the results of the procedure, Dr. Niazi realized that my condition was worse than he anticipated. He recommended that I undergo total carotid artery surgery, which was necessary given my younger age and the severity of the blockage.

A week later (in October of 2009), I was back at Emory for the carotid artery surgery that would clean out the build-up of plaque.  I was in the hospital for three days for the procedure. I left Emory with a scar on my neck and the knowledge that I’d come dangerously close to having a potentially fatal stroke. In my mind, it’s a sort of miracle that my condition was discovered the way it was—if it weren’t for Dr. Niazi’s proactive treatment of my PAD, I’m not sure I’d be here to tell you my story today.

About a month later, I was treated for the PAD that was present in my legs. This was a much simpler procedure—and was practically right in and out of the hospital for it.

Since the surgery, I started taking medication for cholesterol and high blood pressure, and I have yearly checkups to the doctor. I no longer feel any pain in my legs when I exercise. My walking is better, and my balance has improved greatly.

I can’t say enough good things about Dr. Niazi and the team at Emory who treated me. They’re personable, professional, and top-notch, and they took a personal interest in me and carefully listened to me speak about my concerns and symptoms. I feel very fortunate that I was in such good hands and that I escaped the life-threatening repercussions of PAD.

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