Posts Tagged ‘facelift’

Cosmetic Surgery by the Season: When is the Best Time?

Timing is important, even for scheduling cosmetic surgery. Find tips about the best times to have different cosmetic procedures.You’ve heard it before, “timing is everything,” and this applies to plastic surgery too. If you’re considering getting a cosmetic procedure, you probably know that you need to do your homework to find the right surgeon and to choose the best procedure to get the results you want. But have you given much thought to when you should schedule it?

When Should I Have Cosmetic Surgery?

Most people choose to have their surgery based on when it fits their schedule. For example, students and teachers are likely to have surgery over their winter break, spring break or during their summer vacation. Athletes may plan their procedures during their “off season.” Accountants tend to avoid surgery any time near April 15th.

The most important thing is to give yourself enough time for recovery. Think about important upcoming events, and make sure that you don’t cut your recovery time too short to be ready to fully enjoy them.

Tips for When to Schedule Your Procedure

While noninvasive and surgical procedures can be performed safely and effectively at any time of the year, there are certain things you should consider.

Facelift
You should allow several weeks, preferably a few months, to see the full results of a facelift. So, if you have a major event like a child’s wedding or a class reunion coming up, you’ll want to plan ahead to be “picture ready.”

Breast augmentation
Breast augmentation has a fairly quick recovery period and can be fit in more easily than more invasive procedures.

Body contouring
With some body contouring  procedures, like tummy tucks, you won’t be able to perform all of your normal physical activities for a few weeks. So if you’re training for a sports event or have a ski trip coming up, you’ll want to be sure to schedule it well before or after those events.

Another thing to consider is that compression garments, that are sometimes needed after liposuction or other body contouring procedures, can be a bit warm and uncomfortable. Some people choose to have these procedures during cooler months to avoid the added discomfort of wearing compression items in the heat.

Noninvasive/minimally invasive procedures
Noninvasive procedures (like Botox, fillers or Coolsculpting) or certain minimally invasive surgeries (like upper eyelid tuck, liposuction or breast augmentation) require very little recovery time. You don’t have to worry as much about timing with these procedures.

However, if you’re thinking about a deep chemical peel to your face, you need to avoid strong sun exposure for a while. You may want to schedule it for fall or winter.

Emory Aesthetic Center Can Help

The staff and surgeons at Emory Aesthetic Center can help you think through these and other factors to determine the best timing for your cosmetic procedure.

Schedule a consultation with one of our skilled, board-certified cosmetic surgeons.

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Or call us at 404-778-6880 to schedule your personal consultation

About Dr. Eaves

eaves-iii-felmontDr. Eaves recently returned to Atlanta, Georgia, to head the Emory Aesthetic Center as Medical Director, having previously completed his plastic surgery residency as well as a fellowship in endoscopic and minimally invasive plastic surgery at Emory University, The Emory Clinic, and associated hospitals. Before joining the Emory Aesthetic Center, Dr. Eaves was a partner in Charlotte Plastic Surgery for more than fifteen years and served as group president from 2010-2012.

His professional and institutional committee memberships and offices include an impressive list of national, international and local plastic surgery organizations, societies, boards, task forces, advisory councils, coalitions and foundations, including having served as President of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) from 2010-2011 and Trustee (2011-Present).

Dr. Eaves’ primary areas of academic inquiry have been in minimally-invasive and endoscopic aesthetic surgery, patient safety, system and process improvement in plastic surgery, evidence-based medicine applied to plastic surgery and recontouring surgery after massive weight loss. He has received several patents for new medical devices he developed, and has made major clinical service contributions to his field. Dr. Eaves has published more than 100 articles, book chapters and book reviews on plastic surgery in peer reviewed publications, as well as manuals, videos, computer programs and other teaching aids and has coauthored the first textbook on the topic of endoscopic plastic surgery.

Ask the Doctor: What is the Difference Between a Forehead Lift and a Brow Lift?

looking-upIt is not surprising that cosmetic surgeons are often asked what is the difference between a brow lift and a forehead lift. After all, both descriptions involve the same area of the face, and both imply a lift. The brow is considered the hairy part right above the eyelids – the eyebrows, and the forehead is the area between the eyebrows and the scalp. Most patients, and even plastic surgeons, may use these terms interchangeably. Both of these terms describe a procedure intended to smooth and lift the skin of the forehead, and to lift and reposition the brows. How this works, however, is different for each of the areas.

In order to highlight these differences, it can be helpful to compare a brow lift or forehead lift to a facelift. When a facelift is performed, the pulled skin stretches fairly evenly, with the effect seen over the entire length of the face. It is similar to pulling a rubber band that is anchored on one end. In the forehead, however, the skin is thicker and less elastic. When the forehead is pulled, there is much less stretching of the skin.

In order to smooth and lift the skin of the brow/forehead, your surgeon will first gently create a separation between two of the tissue planes of the forehead, allowing them to glide on each other. Your surgeon will also release the attachments of the brows so that they can more freely be moved to the desired position, and then the tissues are then fixed in their new position.

So far, so good . . . but you may be asking, if the forehead skin is not stretched out very much, why do the wrinkles in the forehead get better? That is an interesting question, and the answer is equally interesting. The horizontal wrinkles in the forehead are not static – rather, they are dynamic. In other words they result from the activity of the underlying muscles that work to lift the brows. When the brows are lifted by surgery, then these muscles calm down and become less active because the stimulus to lift the brows is reduced. In addition, a brow/forehead lift often removes the muscles that are between the eyebrows. These muscles, called the corrugators, are the cause of the vertical wrinkles – also known as the “11s”. The corrugators and the muscles that lift the forehead tend to work against each other, so when the corrugators are weakened, the muscles that create the forehead wrinkles tend to work less, also helping the wrinkles to fade.

There are many different brow/forehead lift techniques that you and your cosmetic surgeon can consider depending on your individual needs. In most instances, an endoscopic approach allows for very small incisions hidden in the hairline. But there are some instances where an endoscopic approach can be combined with an incision in the eyelid performed along with an eyelid lift. And although not as common, an incision hidden along the hairline can actually lower the forehead while the brows are being raised in patients who have very high foreheads.

While we tend to use the terms brow lift and forehead lift synonymously, there are procedures where the brow is directly lifted but the forehead is not. A direct brow lift is rarely done, but works by removing a strip of skin along the upper border of the brows. This creates a scar in this area, however this technique can be used in the elderly as these scars may fade well. Another technique is to perform a browpexy, where sutures are placed using an eyelid incision to sew the undersurface of the brow to the bone. This can create a nice elevation of the brow, although it is less powerful than a full brow/forehead lift. As you can guess, this latter technique is most often combined with an upper eyelid lift.

The terms brow lift and forehead lift are used practically to describe the same thing. But what is more important than the terms, is the need to consult with your surgeon to make sure the strategies and techniques they use are best suited for your goals and anatomy. At the Emory Aesthetic Center, our multi-disciplinary team of board-certified physicians can help you navigate all the terms and decisions to come up with a treatment plan custom tailored just for you.


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or call us at 404-778-6880 to schedule a consultation

About Dr. Eaves

eaves-iii-felmontDr. Eaves recently returned to Atlanta, Georgia, to head the Emory Aesthetic Center as Medical Director, having previously completed his plastic surgery residency as well as a fellowship in endoscopic and minimally invasive plastic surgery at Emory University, The Emory Clinic, and associated hospitals. Before joining the Emory Aesthetic Center, Dr. Eaves was a partner in Charlotte Plastic Surgery for more than fifteen years and served as group president from 2010-2012.

His professional and institutional committee memberships and offices include an impressive list of national, international and local plastic surgery organizations, societies, boards, task forces, advisory councils, coalitions and foundations, including having served as President of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) from 2010-2011 and Trustee (2011-Present).

Dr. Eaves’ primary areas of academic inquiry have been in minimally-invasive and endoscopic aesthetic surgery, patient safety, system and process improvement in plastic surgery, evidence-based medicine applied to plastic surgery and recontouring surgery after massive weight loss. He has received several patents for new medical devices he developed, and has made major clinical service contributions to his field. Dr. Eaves has published more than 100 articles, book chapters and book reviews on plastic surgery in peer reviewed publications, as well as manuals, videos, computer programs and other teaching aids and has coauthored the first textbook on the topic of endoscopic plastic surgery.

The Skinny on Non-Surgical Facelifts

happy-ladyNothing could sound better, right? Getting all the benefits of a facelift without the need to undergo cosmetic surgery? But like most things, if it sounds too good to be true, it usually isn’t. The truth is that non-surgical treatments simply can’t replace what a facelift can do. In order to get the best results in your facial rejuvenation, it is often a combination of both non-surgical and surgical options that give you the best result.

More and more, we find ourselves actually combining surgical and non-surgical techniques to give our patients the best results. For example, while a blepharoplasty (eyelid tuck) can tighten the loose skin of the upper eyelid or reduce bagging of the lower eyelid, Botox® can be used to treat the “crow’s feet” at the corner of the eyes while chemical peels, micro-needling, or lasers can help improve the appearance of the lower eyelid skin.

Although a brow lift can create a more open appearance to the eyes, it may not totally address the wrinkles of the brow. Botox® can help here as well, and in addition, dermal fillers can add attractive volume to the brow itself or fill in a temple that has lost volume. In the face, fat grafts as part of a facelift can soften the deeper nasolabial folds (the lines that run from the sides of the nose to the corners of the mouth) but will not help fill in the more superficial lines around the mouth. Chemical peels, lasers, or dermal fillers can be employed to do that.

For a sagging jawline or jowls, only a facelift can predictably help to create a smoother, more youthful jawline. A facelift is the only real tool to tighten loose and sagging skin in the neck. With that being said, it is important not to underestimate the power of non-surgical treatments in this area as well. While they cannot remove the jowls, injectable fillers can camouflage the jowls in younger patients. And while it cannot tighten the loose skin of neck, neurotoxins like Botox® can soften muscular bands in the neck.

In order to figure out what is right for you, it is important that you have a consultation with a surgeon who is an expert in providing both surgical and non-surgical treatments to the face. The options will change depending on your individual needs, your preferences, and your age. At the Emory Aesthetic Center, our board certified physicians are here to help you figure out a treatment plan that is customized just for you.

appt

or call us at 404-778-6880 to schedule a consultation

About Dr. Eaves

eaves-iii-felmontDr. Eaves recently returned to Atlanta, Georgia, to head the Emory Aesthetic Center as Medical Director, having previously completed his plastic surgery residency as well as a fellowship in endoscopic and minimally invasive plastic surgery at Emory University, The Emory Clinic, and associated hospitals. Before joining the Emory Aesthetic Center, Dr. Eaves was a partner in Charlotte Plastic Surgery for more than fifteen years and served as group president from 2010-2012.

His professional and institutional committee memberships and offices include an impressive list of national, international and local plastic surgery organizations, societies, boards, task forces, advisory councils, coalitions and foundations, including having served as President of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) from 2010-2011 and Trustee (2011-Present).

Dr. Eaves’ primary areas of academic inquiry have been in minimally-invasive and endoscopic aesthetic surgery, patient safety, system and process improvement in plastic surgery, evidence-based medicine applied to plastic surgery and recontouring surgery after massive weight loss. He has received several patents for new medical devices he developed, and has made major clinical service contributions to his field. Dr. Eaves has published more than 100 articles, book chapters and book reviews on plastic surgery in peer reviewed publications, as well as manuals, videos, computer programs and other teaching aids and has coauthored the first textbook on the topic of endoscopic plastic surgery.

From Face to Breast to Body: Understanding Aesthetic Surgery

Understanding Aesthetic SurgeryThere is a deep and rich science related to the understanding of the origins, importance, and impact of physical appearance on our lives. Research tells us that as human beings our appearance not only plays a role in how we view ourselves, but it also plays a role in our interaction with the world. Therefore, it is not surprising that in addition to grooming, makeup, and exercise, cosmetic procedures and surgeries have become a popular option to millions of women and men every year.

Although we don’t consciously think of beauty in this way, science teaches us that there are four primary ways in which we care about our appearance. They are youthfulness, symmetry, gender, and normal development. If we think in these terms, it becomes easy to understand that aesthetic surgery of the face, breasts, or body is similar and follows similar patterns.

For instance, as we age our skin and soft tissues loose tone and elasticity. In the face we see it with loose skin, the development of wrinkles, and by tissue drooping. These same kinds of changes can also lead to drooping of the breasts, abdominal skin, and bottom. The most common way to reverse these changes is to “lift” loose tissues. “Lifting” can actually mean pulling up an area, but it can also mean tightening the area by removing some of the loose skin and tissue, so that what is left is pulled tighter. Lifting is a common technique that is used in the face (think brow lift, eyelid lift, or neck lift), breasts (breast lift), and body (think body lifts – tummy tucks, thigh lifts, buttock lifts). Pulled tighter, the lifted area looks more youthful to us.

Youthfulness also correlates with a more fit, athletic appearance, so it is not surprising that fatty deposits bother us, whether it is under the chin, in the “bra roll” area adjacent to the breasts, or on our tummies or thighs. When we can’t fix these areas in the gym, perhaps we can help them with a surgical procedure to remove the unwanted bulge. In a similar way, fat in the right places and the right amounts is a sign of youthful vigor. A full face, full breasts (in a female), and full buttocks are all healthy and are considered to be of youthful, if not too full. With aging and changes in weight, these areas can look either too full or too deflated, so taking away tissue (e.g. liposuction) or adding tissue (e.g. fat grafts) can be used to create more desirable proportions, regardless of the part of the body.

Symmetry is also very important to our concept of attractiveness. Most of us are aware that we may have one foot or hand that is bigger than the other, but other areas such as the face, breast, or body can also demonstrate asymmetry. If one side of our face is smaller than the other, we might seek to correct this with fillers to create more balance. Or if one brow is lower than the other, we might try to correct this with Botox® injections or a brow® lift. Breast asymmetry can be particularly concerning to women, and fortunately this can often be addressed when performing a breast cosmetic procedure. If a patient is interested in increasing the size of the breasts with breast augmentation, size asymmetry can be corrected by putting a larger implant on the side that was initially smaller. If a patient wants breast reduction or to reduce her breast size, the larger side can be reduced more. If the asymmetry is in the form of one breast lower than the other, the lower breast can be lifted more. In the same way, if one thigh is bigger than the other, more liposuction can be done on the larger side. At the extremes, very significant differences in breast size, position, or contour can relate to problems with normal development, so correction in these situations can be particularly rewarding to patients.

Gender is a further key aspect of how we assess our appearances. Men want to look and appear as attractive men, and women want to look and appear as attractive women. Gender differences naturally occur in all areas of our bodies. For instance, in the face men naturally have heavier and lower brows, while women naturally have finer, more delicate and higher brows. Women often address the brows by selective plucking to shape and refine, and a brow lift can restore normal brow height. These characteristics, however, also help guide us as surgeons to what we may want to avoid. In a man who wants to lift his brows to reverse the drooping of aging, we need to be careful not to elevate the brows too much as this creates an overly feminized appearance. In men, the development of a feminizing appearance to the breasts is particularly unsettling, and at the same time is quite common, especially with aging. This development – known as gynecomastia – can be successfully treated by liposuction in most cases. Your surgeon must remain aware of gender differences when contouring your body as well. Too straight of a waist in a female tends to look a bit masculine, while to much “curve” looks feminine on a man.

As you can see, aesthetics of the face, breast, and body follow many of the same patterns, and a lot of the same strategies are used from area to area. Let the Emory Aesthetic Center help you think through your particular concerns and develop a plan that is tailored specifically to your desires and needs.

About Dr. Eaves

Felmont Eaves, MDDr. Eaves recently returned to Atlanta, Georgia, to head the Emory Aesthetic Center as Medical Director, having previously completed his plastic surgery residency as well as a fellowship in endoscopic and minimally invasive plastic surgery at Emory University, The Emory Clinic, and associated hospitals. Before joining the Emory Aesthetic Center, Dr. Eaves was a partner in Charlotte Plastic Surgery for more than fifteen years and served as group president from 2010-2012.

His professional and institutional committee memberships and offices include an impressive list of national, international and local plastic surgery organizations, societies, boards, task forces, advisory councils, coalitions and foundations, including having served as President of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) from 2010-2011 and Trustee (2011-Present).

Dr. Eaves’ primary areas of academic inquiry have been in minimally-invasive and endoscopic aesthetic surgery, patient safety, system and process improvement in plastic surgery, evidence-based medicine applied to plastic surgery and recontouring surgery after massive weight loss. He has received several patents for new medical devices he developed, and has made major clinical service contributions to his field. Dr. Eaves has published more than 100 articles, book chapters and book reviews on plastic surgery in peer reviewed publications, as well as manuals, videos, computer programs and other teaching aids and has coauthored the first textbook on the topic of endoscopic plastic surgery.

What is A “Liquid Facelift”?

liquid-faceliftA “Liquid Facelift “is the non-surgical rejuvenation of the face through injections. These injectables include Botox© (sometimes referred to as “neuromodulators”) which relax the muscles, and fillers which restore volume. The “Liquid Facelift” should not to be confused with the mini or short scar facelift which are surgical procedures.

As our faces age we lose volume, develop lines and lose skin elasticity. Our facial muscles enable us to smile, frown and express our feelings, but over time, these muscles contract, leading to lines or wrinkles on the forehead (frown lines), eyes (crow’s feet) and around the mouth. Loss of facial volume with decreased skin elasticity leads to the development of folds, jowls and the appearance of a sagging face.

Botox©, and similar muscle relaxants such as Dysport©, Xeomin©, help to soften or eliminate the lines on the forehead, around the eyes, elevate and reshape the brow and the area around the mouth. The face appears less wrinkled, more relaxed and rested. The result of muscle relaxants last between four and six months.

Fillers replace lost volume by filling hollowed areas of the face and reducing skin laxity. The effect makes the face appear to be “lifted”. There are a variety of fillers, varying in composition, thickness, longevity and cost. Some are suited for deep injections, others for more superficial placement. Each has its role in facial volume replacement, and it is not unusual to inject two different types of fillers into the same face – deep placement with one type of filler and more superficial with another. Fillers can also be used to soften deep lines and wrinkles in conjunction with muscle relaxants.

Not everyone is a candidate for a “Liquid Facelift”. It is best reserved for patients with early stages of facial aging – those that when relaxing the muscles and adding volume will lead to a “lift”. For those in the later stages of aging with excess and inelastic skin, a surgical facelift may be better served where the excess skin is removed and the deeper tissues are rearranged. A cosmetic surgeon will be able to evaluate your face and make recommendations based on your individual need.

“Liquid Facelift” Frequently Asked Questions

How is the procedure performed? It is an office procedures which may take up to an hour depending on the number and extent of the injections. Some physicians may wish to stage the procedures and spread them over two sessions. A topical anesthetic (numbing cream) is typically applied prior to injection. Some fillers contain local anesthetics. Following the injections ice may be applied to minimize bruising. There is little, if any, down time associated with the procedure, although there is always the possibility of bruising.

Is this an expensive procedure? Costs will vary depending on the amount and type of materials injected. Typically one or two sessions are much less expensive than a surgical facelift. However, the cost of injectables does add up and over a number of months or years may surpass the cost of a surgical facelift.

How long do the results last? These treatments are not permanent nor do they last as long as a surgical facelift. In general, the relaxants last four to six months and the fillers last anywhere from two to four years. Some fillers last longer than others.

Related Resources

Facelifts, Mid-Facelifts & Mini-Facelifts? Understanding Your Facelift Options

Facelift OptionsAs we celebrate a new year and new beginnings, we may find ourselves thinking about enhancing facial features we thought were lost to past years. This can be achieved through the right facial rejuvenation surgery. A well-done facelift can take years off your face, leaving you looking and feeling brighter, fresher, and more attractive.

At the Emory Aesthetic Center, we understand that no one solution is the answer for all – every patient has different goals and needs. There are many different types of facelifts to give you the look you want. Perhaps you’re still in your early 40s, and a more limited procedure may be just what you need. If you’re in your mid 50s and you see a sagging, heavy neck when you look in the mirror, a full facelift may be the answer. Facelifts can also be combined with other procedures such as eyelifts, brow lifts, lasers, or chemical peels. Newer techniques often combine volume restoration with fat grafts or injectibles to create a softer, more natural and younger look. At the Emory Aesthetic Center, we take great pleasure in partnering with you to customize your procedure in order to fulfill your individual needs.

Although there are many variations, at the Emory Aesthetic Center we offer the following facelift options, and will work with you to achieve optimal results:

  • A traditional, or full facelift is designed to restore a more youthful appearance to the neck and jowl region by removing major wrinkles and sagging skin. If there is excess fat in the neck or chin region, this can be addressed simultaneously with liposuction or direct excision. A face lift can improve a tired facial appearance by smoothing the skin and reestablishing defined contours along the neck and jawline. There are several different full face lift techniques which your surgeon can use, varying the incision location and depth of dissection to tailor the procedure to your needs. It is often performed in combination with other procedures, including a brow lift and eyelid surgery, to create an overall harmonious, youthful result.
  • A limited, small incision, or “mini-facelift” is what it sounds like: a less extensive version of the traditional facelift. A mini-facelift may involve shorter incisions or less dissection, but also it is dictated by the amount of laxity or jowling present.
  • A mid-facelift procedure can be used, either alone or combined with other procedures, to correct hollowing beneath the lower eyelids and deep nasolabial folds, or “parentheses”, that run from the base of the nose to the outer corners of the mouth. It creates a more youthful appearance by smoothing the transition between the lower eyelids and upper cheek region. If improvement in the neck or jowl region is also desired, a midface lift can be combined with a more standard facelift.

Our focus is to help you look as young as you feel, and to make you look naturally more beautiful. We enhance your natural beauty, taking years off your face so that you’re noticeably refreshed and more attractive. What we don’t do is make you look unnaturally “lifted” or stretched—something you see all too often in facelifts.

If you’re thinking about facial rejuvenation, let our team of board certified cosmetic surgeons help you realize your vision of you. Our surgeons will meet with you one-on-one to answer your questions and ensure you are confidently ready to take the next step.