Posts Tagged ‘Breast Reduction Surgery’

All About Breast Lifts

breast lift mastopexyAs women age, they often notice changes to their breasts, especially following childbirth and breastfeeding. While it’s true that changes like sagging or drooping are part of the normal aging process, the good news is that if you are unhappy with the look of your breasts, there is a relatively simple procedure called a breast lift that can help reposition, reshape and rejuvenate your breasts to restore a more youthful appearance.

What is a breast lift?

If you’re happy with the size and volume of your breasts but want a perkier look, then a basic breast lift (mastopexy) — a procedure that reshapes and lifts your breast tissue — may be just right for you.

During this procedure, your surgeon will likely remove a substantial amount of skin to help your breast go back to a more aesthetically pleasing position. If you also want to reduce the size of your nipple and its surrounding area (areola), it can be done at the same time.

If you’d like your breasts to be more lifted and larger, you can get those results with a mastopexy with a breast augmentation procedure. Your surgeon will reposition your breasts, and also use a breast implant to increase their volume.

And finally, if you’d like more lifted and smaller breasts, your best option is a mastopexy with a breast reduction. If you currently have implants you’d like to have replaced with smaller implants, we can offer several options.

Where are the incisions made?

Excess skin is removed from all over the breast. The exact location of the incisions depends on how much skin needs to be removed. However, there is always one incision around the areola and one that goes in a straight line down to the fold of the breast. Sometimes, a small incision is also needed in the fold underneath the breast. Your surgeon will discuss with you your unique needs and will be able to show you where your incisions will likely be prior to your surgery.

How long will it take me to recover?

While it may take several months to see the final results from your breast lift, your actual recovery typically happens within a few weeks. You can expect to have some bruising and swelling during that time. You’ll also have stitches and bandages covering your incisions.

Since the procedure doesn’t affect the muscles of the chest, the pain is usually minimal and easily managed. In fact, many patients are able to go off pain medication within a few days after surgery, and back to work within 10 days.

You should plan to avoid intense activities, such as upper-body workouts, for four to six weeks.

Am I a good candidate for a breast lift?

A breast lift can produce remarkable improvement in the appearance of your breasts, but there are limitations to what the surgery can accomplish. As long as you’re in good health and have realistic expectations, you’re a good candidate. Some lifestyle choices, like smoking, increase your risks and can have a negative impact on healing, so being a non-smoker is ideal.

Your surgeon will talk with you about your medical history, as well as assess your current health, before scheduling any cosmetic procedure.

Emory Aesthetic Center

At Emory Aesthetic Center, we’re committed to making your cosmetic surgery experience a positive one. Our team of highly skilled surgeons are happy to answer questions that you may have, so you fully understand what you can expect during and after your breast lift procedure.

Contact us today to schedule a consultation and speak to a cosmetic surgeon about the approach that’s right for you.

About Dr. Miotto

Gabriele C. Miotto, MD, is an assistant professor of surgery in the division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Emory University School of Medicine, and the associate program director of the Emory Aesthetic Center Fellowship Program. She is fellowship-trained in aesthetic and oculoplastic surgery and certified by the Georgia Composite Medical Board as well as the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and Brazilian Society of Plastic Surgery. Dr. Miotto is also certified by the National Board of Medical Examiners.

 

Request an appointmentor call us at 404-778-6880.

Augmentation, Reduction or Lift? – Your Breast Surgery Questions Answered

breast-aug-emailHave you been contemplating breast surgery? Whether you are considering breast augmentation (enhancement), breast reduction or breast lift surgery, it is important to understand the full extent of the procedure.

During our live chat on Thursday, November 17th, hosted by Emory Aesthetic Center’s plastic surgeon, Dr. Felmont Eaves, we answered questions about the different types of breast surgery options available. Dr. Eaves discussed what to expect during surgery and the recovery process. He also gave advice on choosing the right plastic surgeon to obtain the natural looking results you desire.

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference. A full list of questions and answers can be found on our chat transcript. You can also visit emoryaesthetic.org for a full list of services and treatments offered by the Emory Aesthetic Center.

Question: Do you typically do a reduction and a lift at the same time?

Dr. Eaves: Yes, a breast reduction always includes a breast lift, but you can lift without reducing if a reduction is not needed.

Question: If I get breast implants now, will I likely need a lift down the road?

Dr. Eaves: You may or may not. Many women with breast implants never need a lift, although it might be that after a decade or two that the extra size could contribute to the breast becoming more droopy. A lot of it will be related to how much breast tissue and the elasticity of the breast skin at the time of augmentation. It is certainly something to discuss at the time of consultation.

Question: Hi Dr. Eaves, I am set for a consultation in a few weeks, but am not sure which option to have – a breast lift (BL) or breast reduction (BR). My breast size is a 34F and I am a medium body frame with small bulge on the lateral aspect of my breast. Not sure if I can live with the post scarring from the breast reduction. Do you think for the best cosmetic look I would be a good candidate for periareolar BR or would a BL be better?

Dr. Eaves: In thinking through your individual circumstance, it is important to remember that a reduction always comes with a lift – that is just part of it. If a patient needs a lift, that lift can be done alone with no change in breast size, or the breasts can be reduced (a little or a lot, depending on what is needed), or the breast can even be augmented. The one thing is that – in general – a periareolar reduction or mastopexy is often ill-advised, unless the deformity is absolutely minimal. Although it sounds great to have a smaller scar, in reality that periareolar scar often looks very abnormal if trying to do any significant lifting or reduction, so that both the scar and breast shape will be poor. Be cautious – except in very limited circumstances, a peri-areolar only approach can be problematic.

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Augmentation, Reduction or Lift – Join Our Breast Surgery Live Chat

Join us for a live chat on November 17th as we discuss different types of breast surgery options and answer questions about what to expect from surgery.Have you been contemplating breast surgery? Whether you are considering breast augmentation (enhancement), breast reduction or breast lift surgery, it is important to understand the full extent of the procedure. Join us for a live chat with Emory Aesthetic Center plastic surgeon, Dr. Felmont Eaves, on Thursday, November 17, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. EST as he discusses these different types of breast surgery options and answers all of your questions about what to expect, the surgery and recovery. He will also give you advice on choosing the right plastic surgeon to obtain the natural looking results you desire.

If you have been wondering if a breast surgery procedure is right for you, you won’t want to miss this chat.

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About Dr. Eaves

eaves-iii-felmontDr. Eaves recently returned to Atlanta, Georgia, to head the Emory Aesthetic Center as Medical Director, having previously completed his plastic surgery residency as well as a fellowship in endoscopic and minimally invasive plastic surgery at Emory University, The Emory Clinic, and associated hospitals. Before joining the Emory Aesthetic Center, Dr. Eaves was a partner in Charlotte Plastic Surgery for more than fifteen years and served as group president from 2010-2012.

His professional and institutional committee memberships and offices include an impressive list of national, international and local plastic surgery organizations, societies, boards, task forces, advisory councils, coalitions and foundations, including having served as President of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) from 2010-2011 and Trustee (2011-Present).

Dr. Eaves’ primary areas of academic inquiry have been in minimally-invasive and endoscopic aesthetic surgery, patient safety, system and process improvement in plastic surgery, evidence-based medicine applied to plastic surgery and recontouring surgery after massive weight loss. He has received several patents for new medical devices he developed, and has made major clinical service contributions to his field. Dr. Eaves has published more than 100 articles, book chapters and book reviews on plastic surgery in peer reviewed publications, as well as manuals, videos, computer programs and other teaching aids and has coauthored the first textbook on the topic of endoscopic plastic surgery.

Your Weight and Plastic Surgery: Why It Matters

exercising-2womenSometimes patients will go into a plastic surgeon’s office excited about a decision to finally move forward with breast or body contouring surgery, but then afterwards emerge having found out they are not currently a candidate because of excess body fat. This scenario is not only disappointing, but it can be an emotionally deflating and potentially embarrassing experience for patients. As plastic surgeons we sympathize over the emotional pain that such patients feel, and we want to help them realize their goals. However there are several specific reasons that your plastic surgeon might recommend weight loss prior to undergoing a procedure and our motivations are only to provide you with the safest care and the best results.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), currently 69% of the U.S. population over 20 years of age is overweight. Of this percentage, 35% is obese. So how does the CDC calculate this statistic? First, the CDC defines “normal” weight, “overweight” and “obese” using a formula that calculates Body Mass Index (BMI). This is based on your height and weight. A “normal” BMI is 20-25, “overweight” is defined as a BMI of 25-30, and a BMI over 30 is technically considered “obese”. The BMI calculation is not perfect – for instance it does not take into account muscle mass versus fat mass – yet it is a pretty good basic measurement nonetheless. And it is important to us as plastic surgeons because BMI is a good predictor of the risks of surgery and the likelihood of a good result.

Many medical studies have shown that increased BMI is a predictor of potential complications that can occur from plastic surgery. A higher BMI is associated with an increased risk for wound complications, such as dehiscense (the wound opens up), infection, or tissue necrosis (tissues do not survive due to poor blood supply). The increases are typically small for patients who are overweight – a BMI 25-30, but they start increasing quickly as the BMI enters into the obese range. In general, it is a fair statement that the higher the BMI, the higher the risks of surgery. These complications can be significant, so as plastic surgeons we consider these risks with great thought.

In addition, the results that you can get are likely to be much better if your weight is in a better range. Let’s consider a couple of examples. Say, for instance, that a patient wants breast reduction surgery, but they are very heavy. Even when the breasts become smaller and more uplifted, it is extremely difficult for us to deal with the fullness lateral to the breasts (the “bra roll”), which significantly compromises the aesthetic result. In addition, it is much harder to get a beautiful transition between the breast and the abdomen due to the excess weight. On the other hand, let’s consider the patient that is overweight and wants a tummy tuck or liposuction. In this instance, the surgeon will not be able to remove all the excess fat in these areas, as it is technically challenging and can look odd as it is out of proportion to the surrounding fatty deposits. Even a lot of liposuction cannot fully solve this problem. Body contouring surgery is great for shaping your body, but it is not a method or substitute for weight loss or weight control.

What is the “cutoff” BMI number for plastic surgery? That is a difficult question, and there are some exceptions based on individual surgical procedures, body fat distribution, muscle mass and other factors. Many plastic surgeons consider a BMI above 30 or 32 to be in the range where surgery should be delayed until weight loss is achieved. If you are interested in calculating your own BMI, there are several free online tools, including the one from the Emory Bariatric Center.

As plastic surgeons I believe that we have an ethical responsibility to guide our patients related to their weight and desire for surgery. When surgery is unfavorable due to weight, there is the opportunity to partner toward a weight loss goal. Struggling with excess weight is a problem that so many of us deal with, and it is good to know that someone is on your side and understands. We can provide some advice, but even more importantly we can help guide you toward weight loss experts that help with diet modification and even newer procedures – such as the recently approved intragastric balloon – to assist with weight loss. Let the board certified plastic surgeons of the Emory Aesthetic Center, along with the Emory Bariatric Center, help you achieve the weight and body that you want. Imagine the joy of finally getting your weight under control, and then having the surgery you want to get the most effective results.

404-778-6880
emoryaesthetic.org
Click here to schedule your personal consultation.

About Dr. Eaves

eaves-iii-felmontDr. Eaves recently returned to Atlanta, Georgia, to head the Emory Aesthetic Center as Medical Director, having previously completed his plastic surgery residency as well as a fellowship in endoscopic and minimally invasive plastic surgery at Emory University, The Emory Clinic, and associated hospitals. Before joining the Emory Aesthetic Center, Dr. Eaves was a partner in Charlotte Plastic Surgery for more than fifteen years and served as group president from 2010-2012.

His professional and institutional committee memberships and offices include an impressive list of national, international and local plastic surgery organizations, societies, boards, task forces, advisory councils, coalitions and foundations, including having served as President of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) from 2010-2011 and Trustee (2011-Present).

Dr. Eaves’ primary areas of academic inquiry have been in minimally-invasive and endoscopic aesthetic surgery, patient safety, system and process improvement in plastic surgery, evidence-based medicine applied to plastic surgery and recontouring surgery after massive weight loss. He has received several patents for new medical devices he developed, and has made major clinical service contributions to his field. Dr. Eaves has published more than 100 articles, book chapters and book reviews on plastic surgery in peer reviewed publications, as well as manuals, videos, computer programs and other teaching aids and has coauthored the first textbook on the topic of endoscopic plastic surgery.

How to Know if Breast Reduction Surgery is Right for You…

measuring-bustSometimes it seems that we as women wish for things that we do not have. For instance, if you have curly hair, you may wish it were straight. And for women without breasts, they may wish that they had more volume. I see this daily as women come into my office requesting a larger breast size. Conversely, I have women who come into my office with large breasts requesting to reduce the size, stating that the size is impacting them physically. Are you one of those women?

If you are wondering whether breast reduction surgery is right for you, consider the following:

1. Do you have large breasts?

This may seem obvious…and it is. But consider your breast size as it relates to your overall body. Have the breasts gotten larger as a symptom of weight gain? If you are at your ideal body weight, are the breasts still large? If you lose weight, does your breast size decrease? If your breasts are proportionally larger than the rest of your body, you are likely to be a good candidate for a breast reduction. If, however, they are proportional, we may recommend weight loss as your first line of approach to address any physical symptoms.

2. Do you suffer from constant back, neck, and/or shoulder pain?

Are you in pain? Is it mainly in the upper back and neck area? Does it worsen as the day progresses? Does anything help? Have you tried massage? Physical therapy? Most insurance carriers request at least 3 months of documented conservative treatment prior to approving a breast reduction. If you have done all of these things, and the pain persists, you may benefit from breast reduction surgery.

3. Make sure that your breasts are the real cause of your pain.

Similar to my recommendations above, before proceeding with invasive surgery, try things that might improve your posture. How about a yoga class? Are you hunched over a computer all day? Are you able to change your daily habits and improve your symptoms? How about a bra fitting? It is estimated that 80% of women wear an incorrect bra size.

4. Is finding a bra a nightmare?

If you currently wear more than a DD, it can seem difficult to find a bra. You can’t get it at Target or Victoria’s Secret. There are lots of bra boutiques in Atlanta, but these bras can be expensive. If this describes your shopping experience, you may benefit from surgery.

5. Is it hard to find clothes that fit?

Similar to finding a bra, are clothes difficult for you to find due to your chest size? Is it a matter of the breasts being far larger than your waist? Do you have to wear a larger size just because of your breasts? This is a symptom of the disproportion that may make you a good candidate for a breast reduction.

6. Does your frame feel out of proportion with the rest of your body?

Do you have a small frame but large breasts? Are the breasts weighing you down or does it feel like they are pulling you over? These symptoms may suggest you would benefit from breast reduction surgery.

7. Make sure you’re emotionally and physically mature enough.

Particularly if you are a teen or young adult, make sure your breasts have stopped developing. There is no age minimum for breast reduction surgery but during the teens and early twenties, your body will change significantly and it may be better to wait until these changes are stable. It is important to be emotionally ready to go through surgery too. These are permanent changes.

8. Talk to a plastic surgeon.

Once you have thought these issues through, it is time to talk to a plastic surgeon. Be prepared to discuss your symptoms as well as what you have done to try to address them prior to your consultation. Supporting letters from your primary care physician or OB/GYN may also be helpful. Calculate your body mass index (BMI). Insurance companies use these numbers to decide if they will cover the procedure. Your consultation will include a discussion as to whether insurance coverage is reasonable or a cosmetic quote will be provided. And lastly be prepared to have photos taken. This is another requirement of insurance carriers.

If you think a breast reduction is right for you, schedule a complimentary consultation with a board certified surgeon at the Emory Aesthetic Center to help you realize your goals and improve your life.

404-778-6880
emoryaesthetic.org
Click here to schedule your personal consultation.

About Dr. Anderson

anderson-ericaErica Anderson, MD, is board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and currently holds an appointment as Assistant Professor in the Division of Plastic Surgery at Emory University. Dr. Anderson completed her general surgery residency and plastic surgery residency at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and associated hospitals in Denver, CO. She completed a year of advanced training in Aesthetic Surgery at Grotting Plastic Surgery in Birmingham, Alabama.

Dr. Anderson returns to Emory University after being in private practice in Arlington, Virginia. While there, she maintained a busy aesthetic and reconstructive practice and also served as Medical Director for the Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Center at Virginia Hospital Center.

Dr. Anderson’s academic and research interests are largely focused on clinical outcomes with regards to cosmetic surgery. Her areas of clinical interest are diverse including cosmetic surgery of the breast and body as well chest wall reconstruction and wound care.

Dr. Anderson is married with 3 children, Trent, Connor and Fiona, and 2 vizslas, Max and Mimi.