Posts Tagged ‘women’s health’

Dr. Styblo Follows Up with Answers to Breast Cancer Questions

We held a chat on the topic of breast cancer with Dr. Toncred Styblo in October. From that chat, we got lots of great questions and feedback and even a couple questions we couldn’t get to in the chat’s allotted time. Dr. Styblo has taken the time to answer those questions for this follow up blog post, mostly covering questions related to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a type of breast cancer typically found in the lining of the milk ducts that has not yet invaded nearby tissues.

Below are the questions Dr. Styblo has covered in this post:

  • How long does one continue to follow up with oncologist and surgeon after DCIS diagnosis and resultant mastectomy?
  • What is the risk of recurrence in other breast after DCIS and mastectomy?
  • Does that include blood work for Ca27-29, and how often?
  • I’m interested in risk of recurrence after DCIS diagnosis. If you continue to follow your patients for life (which Dr. Styblo mentioned in the chat that she does), that suggests a moderate risk for recurrence.]
  • What would you suggest in the case of multifocal DCIS?

Answers from Dr. Styblo:

Toncred Marya Styblo, M.D.DCIS, intraductal cancer and in situ ductal cancer are names for stage “0″ breast cancer. Stage 0 breast cancer is cured by removing it completely with surgery, but does not have any affect on the risk of developing a second breast cancer in that breast or the other breast.

The surgery to remove the cancer may be a lumpectomy or it might be a mastectomy.  This risk of a patient developing another breast cancer post-surgery is dependent on many factors and the risk is best assessed by your doctor.  The subsequent follow up and recommendations about screening and risk reduction will be dependent on additional factors including the pathologic features of the DCIS and the patient’s risk of developing a second breast cancer.

Because DCIS is stage 0 breast cancer, follow up is primarily to screen for another breast cancer rather than recurrence.  The screening includes breast imaging and clinical exam, there are no blood tests indicated.


Dr. Styblo also received a question on the topic of support in the chat: What role, in your opinion does emotional support play in achieving the best possible outcome after breast cancer? Where or how do you recommend patients find advocates? The Winship Cancer Institute has several programs for survivors and support, including the Peer Partner Program which “matches cancer survivors and caregivers with cancer patients and caregivers dealing with a similar diagnosis of cancer, pre-cancerous condition, or benign tumor.”

Breast Health & Breast Cancer Related Resources:

 

 

Why a Pap Smear Might Not Catch All Cervical Cancers

Most women are familiar with the Pap smear, also known as the pap test. Most of us are also aware that the main goal of the Pap smear is to identify cancerous or abnormal cells that may turn into cancer after collecting them from the lining of the cervix. However, based on findings recently published in the International Journal of Cancer, Pap smears may not be the most reliable way to pinpoint cancer types that can often be harder to detect.

According to Kevin Ault, MD, an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Emory’s School of Medicine and Winship Cancer Institute, the Pap smear is not always effective in the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Ault came to this conclusion after conducting a post-hoc analysis of Gardasil vaccine trials. Adenocarcinoma is a type of cervical cancer that begins significantly far up the cervical canal, an area that often is not sampled when a Pap smear is conducted.

Andenocarcinoma is the second most common type of cervical cancer, accounting for about 20 percent of all cervical cancer cases. While the overall incidence rate of cervical cancer is on the decline, Ault reports the proportion of andenocarcinoma cervical cancer is rising.

As the 8th most common type of cancer in American women, more than 12,000 new cases of invasive cervical cancer are diagnosed each year. Scientists believe that pre-invasive cervical cancer may develop over a period of months or years after the cervix is infected with the sexually transmitted HPV.

A leading expert and pioneer in the field of human papilloma virus (HPV), Ault suggests women might seek an HPV and Pap test at the same time. Why? A positive HPV test may be an indicator for early stages of adenocarcinoma cervical cancer that can’t be determined via a standard Pap test.

Breast Health – Not Just for October

Enter our Breast Health Contest

Enter to Win Breast Health Contest
As the second most common cancer affecting women (13% of all women will develop breast cancer in their lives), breast cancer is a prevalent disease that deserves attention year round, not just during the month of October. We’ve intentionally made our breast health contest and the resources you’ll find here available starting in the month of November to demonstrate our commitment to year-round awareness. To encourage participation in this year round effort, we’re asking for your help and feedback.

With 1 in every 8 women being affected by breast cancer during their lives, chances are you have been touched by breast cancer at some point in your life. Whether this happened via a friend or family member who won the fight against breast cancer, or participation in fundraisers or campaigns to raise awareness, or if you yourself have or are battling breast cancer, we would love to hear your story.

If you have thoughts, tips, advice, words of inspiration, or even just an idea for how to promote breast cancer awareness, we want to hear from you! Better yet, tell us how you’re promoting breast cancer awareness. Visit our breast health contest page and share your feedback. Two winning entries will be selected and the winners will receive tickets for a special surprise event. If you’re interested, check out contest details and share your story! You’ll never know how many lives you can change or touch with your feedback until you give it a try.

Deadline for submission is November 17th. Winners will be notified November 18th.

Enter the breast health contest …all it takes is a quick comment.