Posts Tagged ‘winship clinical trials’

Winship Cancer Institute Celebrates 2015 as a Banner Year

Ranked first in Georgia for cancer care, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University offers patients with access to progressive resources, technology and cancer treatment options through Georgia’s largest health care system Emory Healthcare. As Georgia’s first and only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, Winship is a national leader in seeking out new ways to defeat cancer and in translating that knowledge into patient care.

Key 2015 Highlights:

  • For the second year in a row, Winship was ranked as a top 25 cancer program nationwide, moving up from 24th to 22nd nationally, and as best in Georgia by U.S. News & World Report.
  • Winship expanded staff and services this year at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory John’s Creek Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown.
  • Winship’s clinical trials program enrolled more patients on trials than in any other year and contributed to the approval of four new therapies for multiple myeloma.
  • Winship exceeded its fundraising goal for the Win the Fight 5K in September, bringing in more than $778,000 for cancer research.

Read the full transcript of the video here.

Winship Trial Reduces Mortality Rate for APL Patients

Winship's APL team (left to right): Martha Arellano, Kaitlin Sitchenko, Anand P. Jillella, Vamsi Kota, Ann Shen, Emily Bennett.

Winship’s APL team (left to right): Martha Arellano, Kaitlin Sitchenko, Anand P. Jillella, Vamsi Kota, Ann Shen, Emily Bennett.

Winship oncologist Anand Jillella, MD is spearheading a clinical trial for patients with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) that could change the mortality rate for this disease on a major scale.

Often called the heart attack of leukemias, APL is a highly aggressive disease that is curable if treated early. A third of patients, however, do not survive the first month of treatment. By observing and analyzing the problem, Jillella and his team of physicians, nurses, and research staff came up with a collaborative approach that decreases mortality from 30 percent to about five percent. This new trial is open to patients all across the country.

Jillella has found that some physicians who treat patients with APL may not be familiar with the potential complications that can develop during treatment. He took a very detailed treatment algorithm and boiled it down to a three-step process that can be easily shared. “As soon as we get a call from a community physician, we send the simplified algorithm via smart phone,” says Jillella. “We come up with a treatment plan based on what the patient is experiencing and follow up with them regularly to get them through that difficult first month.”

RELATED RESOURCES:
Getting the Best Cancer Treatments into Outlying Communities
Clinical Trials: Leading the Way to Better Health Care

Phase I Trials – Where All Anticancer Drugs Begin

Donald Harvey, MD

R. Donald Harvey, PharmD, FCCP BCOP, director of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s Phase I Clinical Trials section

Each of the agents we use to treat cancer had a beginning, a first step, in understanding how safe and effective they might be.  As drugs are developed, we ask questions in different ways at each step, or phase, of testing. The National Cancer Institute reminds us that clinical trials are available for all patients at all points in their cancer journey, not just for patients with advanced cancer that is not responding to treatment.

When a drug is first given to patients, it enters testing in a phase I trial, where we ask questions such as:

  • What is the right dose?
  • How should it be given (e.g., by mouth, by vein, under the skin)?
  • What is the right schedule of treatment?
  • What side effects are there and how severe are they?
  • How often do we see side effects?
  • Where did the drug go in the patient? How well was it absorbed? How was it metabolized and/or eliminated? (Pharmacokinetics)
  • What did the drug do to the patient, both in blood and at the site of the cancer? (Pharmacodynamics)

Patients courageous enough to enter phase I trials are asked to do many time-consuming but important things during the trial. Frequently, patients are asked to spend 10-12 hours in our clinical trials unit and/or come in daily up to 14 times during the first treatment period, or cycle. During these visits, blood is drawn, tumor or bone marrow biopsies may be performed and safety tests are conducted, all in an effort to get a complete picture of drug effect, disposition and side effects.

Participation in phase I clinical trials:

To participate in a phase I trial, patients typically have cancer that has not been effectively treated with other therapies, and most trials require patients to be otherwise relatively healthy. Phase I trials usually enroll 10-40 patients, but may be larger or smaller depending on the questions being asked. Two types of phase I trials exist: those where the drug is being given for the first time, or first-in-human trials; and those where there is prior experience and the drug is given in combination with another drug or drugs (also called phase IB trials). In each, the investigational agent is given to small groups of patients, and doses are increased in each group. Both types are critical to the next step of development to define the dose, frequency, and understand what cancer types are most likely to benefit.

Phase I trials help to determine the future of drugs in cancer treatment. Right now, the large number of new agents in early testing indicates great potential in the transformation of therapy. People in good health may choose to participate in clinical trials simply to help researchers find better treatments. Participation in clinical trials is completely voluntary, but you should also speak with your physician before deciding to enroll.

Related Resources

 

 

 

About Dr. Harvey

R. Donald Harvey, PharmD, FCCP BCOP is director of the Winship Cancer Institute’s Phase I Clinical Trials section, and Associate Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is a Fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy and a board certified oncology pharmacist. Widely published in peer-reviewed journals, Dr. Harvey’s research interests include the clinical application of pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacogenomic data to patient care.