Posts Tagged ‘Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’

Navigating a Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men and can often be treated successfully. In fact, more than 2 million men in the U.S. are prostate cancer survivors. But a daunting set of questions faces the more than 200,000 men who are newly diagnosed with prostate cancer each year: is prompt or aggressive treatment necessary, or is “watchful waiting” an option? And if choosing treatment, then what kind?

Hugh Smith was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the age of 51. Knowing that members of his family had died from prostate cancer prompted Smith to get checked. When tests showed the presence of cancer, he looked for an experienced prostate specialist who could provide the most advanced treatment available. Winship’s Dr. Martin Sanda performed a prostatectomy via robotic surgery at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital in 2013. Since then, Smith says he’s had no side effects and no recurrent cancer. He thanks God and the expertise of his cancer team for the good results. Now he wants to encourage other men to take charge of their own health. “Some men would rather not know about their risk of prostate cancer, but I say go in with your eyes wide open.”

Winship is at the forefront of research aimed at helping men at all stages of their journey with prostate cancer. A crucial segment of that journey starts with determining if a cancer is aggressive and fast-growing, or the type of slow, indolent cancer that could be safely monitored without treatment.

Winship urologists and cancer biologists are part of a nationwide effort to develop new blood and urine tests that could substantially improve detecting prostate cancer and determining how aggressive individual cancers might be. To more read about our approach to prostate cancer and other research advances in detecting and treating prostate cancer, go to http://advancingyourhealth.org/winship-prostate/

RELATED RESOURCES:
Cancer Clinical Study Leads to Video Tool for Prostate Cancer Patients
Two Patients Benefit from Two Alternative Treatment Options for Prostate Cancer
PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer – A Healthy Debate
Questions on Validity of PSA Test as Prostate Cancer Screening Tool
Prostate Cancer, To Screen or Not?
Winship’s Approach to Prostate Cancer Treatment

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Working During Cancer Treatment

Working with CancerTo work, or not to work, during cancer treatment is often a very real decision that patients must make. Some patients need to continue working during treatment for financial support, or to keep their insurance coverage, or just an overall desire to continue working. Working during treatment can be difficult depending on the type of treatment a patient receives, but also on the type of work a patient does. For example, a patient who can work from home may be able to continuing working whereas a patient with a job that requires more physical demands may be unable to continue working. Here are a few things to remember when working during cancer treatment:

  • Discuss your job situation with your medical team. It is important for your medical team to be aware of your desire or need to work during treatment. This may help in determining a treatment schedule that works best for you in order to continue working. Also, discussing the type of work you do with your medical team will allow them to provide you with appropriate information about how your treatment may affect your ability to perform the duties of your job.
  • Depending on your level of comfort, talk with your employer or human resource department about your diagnosis and treatment schedule. This will allow you to discuss any accommodations you may need in order to complete your job tasks. This is also an opportunity to discuss the possibility of working from home.
  • Consider utilizing the Family Medical Leave Act, if you are eligible. This important legislation was put in place in order to protect patients when they must leave work in order to receive medical care. Consult your human resources department for additional guidance in determining if you are covered through this.
  • Consult your human resource department regarding possible short-term or long-term disability benefits you may have available. There may be times in which patients are unable to work due to lengthy hospitalizations or because their medical team advises against it. In instances such as these, you may consider utilizing your short-term and long-term disability benefits in order to continue receiving some income.
  • If you are comfortable, talk with your coworkers about your diagnosis and treatment. Coworkers can be a strong source of support and encouragement during these difficult times. This may also help in developing a work schedule that works for you during treatment.
  • Talk with the social worker at your oncology office. Social workers may be able to help problem solve any concerns or issues you may be having with your employer.

Although working during cancer treatment may be challenging, it does not have to be impossible. Just talking with others about this may help you get the assistance you need.

About Joy McCall, LCSW

Joy McCallJoy McCall is a Winship social worker with bone marrow transplant, hematology and gynecologic teams and their patients. She started her professional career at Winship as an intern, working with breast, gynecologic, brain and melanoma cancer patients. She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Kennesaw State University and a Master of Social Work from the University of Georgia. As part of her education she completed an internship with the Marcus Institute working on the pediatric feeding unit, and an internship counseling individuals and couples at Families First, supporting families and children facing challenges to build strong family bonds and stability for their future. She had previously worked with individuals with developmental disabilities for over 4 years, providing support to families and caregivers.

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Why Winship?

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University“For every question that we answer or seek to answer, new questions arise.”

Winship’s executive director, Wally Curran , MD, said that in answer to an interview question about Winship, and I think it provides insight on the incremental way that progress is made against cancer.

It also helps describe the dedication of cancer doctors and researchers who are willing to keep pursuing answers to this vastly complex puzzle.

The communications team at Winship has been asking another type of question lately: “Why Winship?” The answers we got are now the basis of a website, social media and poster campaign highlighting stories that show how our doctors, researchers and healthcare staff make discoveries and translate the latest breakthroughs in cancer research into better treatments for patients.

The stories are told through the words and thoughts of people who have been treated at Winship, and through the Winship staff who work toward finding ever-better ways to defeat cancer.

Our first round of “Why Winship?” videos, now on our website, features a group of Winship physicians who represent the comprehensive spectrum of patient care we are able to offer, from the latest drug and radiation therapies, to innovative surgical techniques. Here is a sampling of their thoughts on what makes Winship a unique place for them.

WALTER J. CURRAN, JR., MD
WINSHIP EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
“Winship is about depth and breadth. It’s the depth and breadth of our team that approaches a cancer problem. For example, in lung cancer, we have depth and breadth in the surgical, pulmonary, oncology, scientific, and epidemiologic teams which confront the leading cancer killer. Without the depth and breadth, we could not make the progress for a given patient and we also could not make the progress for a given problem as complex as lung cancer.”

FADLO R. KHURI, MD
WINSHIP DEPUTY DIRECTOR
“I think there is a spirit of humility and genuine discovery that suffuses the place. People want to know not just why, but why didn’t a treatment work, why didn’t a patient benefit, and go back to understand from every specific patient encounter how we can do better and more importantly how we can help them to do better.”

KAREN GODETTE, MD
WINSHIP RADIATION ONCOLOGIST
“With that team effort, [you’re] getting the best technology, multi-modality therapy with what we call translational research and the up-to-date protocols and everything in one place. Rather than having to hunt around to get the best in each thing you have it right here. An example is our sarcoma conference. There’s a thoracic surgeon, a radiation oncologist, a medical oncologist, everyone is right there at the same time talking about the patient…. you have the best of everything right there.”

PETER ROSSI, MD
Winship Radiation Oncologist
“I know that I am going to be supported to go in the direction I think is most cutting edge that is the best for my patients… You have to have an administration that has a long-term vision of that. You don’t see that commonly and we have that at Winship Cancer Institute.”

VIRAJ MASTER, MD, PhD
Winship Urologist
“What gets me really excited about working at Winship is I have the ability to have incredible collaborative efforts that take place every day, and I particularly point out my colleagues in surgery, be it thoracic surgery, vascular surgery, surgical oncology. We work well together because we truly believe that the sum is greater than the individual. It allows us to do operations that I only dreamed of doing when I was in training, and we do it better here at Winship than anywhere else.”

About Catherine Williams

catherine-williams-2014As Senior Communications Manager for Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Catherine Williams creates print, video and electronic communications materials and serves as a media relations contact for consumer health, news and science media.

Catherine came to Winship after 30 years as a television producer in New York, Washington and Atlanta, producing news, magazine and documentary programming. She has won awards for special reports covering health/science, public affairs and entertainment. She says news was exciting but nothing compares to the satisfaction of working with the dedicated and inspiring staff of Winship.

A Look Back at Winship Cancer Institute’s Extraordinary 2014

Since 1937, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University has provided cancer patients throughout Georgia, the Southeast and beyond, with outstanding patient care and research, and 2014 was no exception. From several national recognitions to record-setting fundraising goals, Winship at Emory continues to be among the leaders in the state of Georgia and the nation in finding ways to defeat cancer. While we enter 2015 with excitement and expectancy, the administrators, physicians and researchers of Winship at Emory have taken time to celebrate the remarkable last year. Click on the “Year in Review” video below to see some of Winship’s highlights from 2014, including:

Key 2014 milestones:

  • U.S. News & World Report ranked cancer care at Emory University Hospital through Winship among the 25 best in the country.
  • Nurses at Emory University Hospital and Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital were honored with the prestigious Magnet award for excellence in patient care.
  • Winship was the only cancer center in Georgia named as one of 30 U.S. cancer centers for the new National Cancer Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.
  • Winship exceeded its fundraising goal for the Win the Fight 5K in September, bringing in more than $600,000 for cancer research.

Winship 2014

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Progress and Thanks for Five Years of Phase I Clinical Trials

Phase I AnniversaryPatients.

Clinical trials.

We cannot have one without the other.

The Phase I Clinical Trials Unit at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University opened in 2009, a time when a significant expansion of clinical trial efforts was underway to support the National Cancer Institute cancer center designation. Over this rapid five-year period, a truly collaborative culture has led to a cutting-edge, early drug development program at a nationally recognized, top 25 cancer center.

None of this has been possible without patients putting their trust in our physicians, nurses, scientists, and many others, to deliver optimal care while asking critical questions about novel drugs and approaches. When I think about the impact of our Phase I unit on patients and their families, I recall a recent conversation with a seasoned oncologist here at Emory. He said, “Donald, if I saw anyone in the chairs here at a store, I wouldn’t know they had cancer.” A simple statement, but one that conveys a number of key messages about how our phase I trials have evolved over five years. Drugs we now have at hand, as a whole, are much safer and better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy. We also have access to more agents with much better activity against cancer, leading to more treatment options.

With improved treatment comes a sense of satisfaction. However, we cannot over-emphasize the critical effect patients have on us as health care providers, researchers, and human beings. As a clinician-researcher, the greatest motivating factor I have is seeing patients do well on trials and coming to visits to talk about trips, family gatherings, important personal events, and the role that treatment on a trial had in helping them live their lives.

For this, we say thank you to our patients and their families for their trust and the courage they show on a daily basis. You keep up your fight, and we will keep up ours.

About Dr. Harvey

R. Donald Harvey, FCCP, BCOPR. Donald Harvey, PharmD, FCCP BCOP is director of the Winship Cancer Institute’s Phase I Clinical Trials section, and Associate Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is a Fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy and a board certified oncology pharmacist. Widely published in peer-reviewed journals, Dr. Harvey’s research interests include the clinical application of pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacogenomic data to patient care.

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Easing the Tension of Traveling for Cancer Treatment

Travel for TreatmentAs a social worker at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, I see many patients who travel from out of the state and the country in order to receive medical care. Their cancer treatment can sometimes be scheduled every day for six weeks or more. This can add a lot of stress to an already difficult situation.

It can be daunting to arrange all the transportation and lodging logistics, especially for an extended period of time. Patients and caregivers are also faced with being away from the comforts of their own home and support of loved ones who may live close by. Here are a few tips to consider if you have to travel for treatment:

  1. Contact your medical insurance company regarding travel benefits. Some insurers will provide transportation and lodging benefits in the form of reimbursements if patients must receive treatment a great distance from their home.
  2. Discuss hardships with your medical team. Make sure that your doctor and nurse navigator are aware of any financial hardship you are going through in order to get treatment. Some patients may be able to receive their therapy closer to home at a local infusion or radiation center. They can still continue to be followed by their preferred physician who is out of town.
  3. Reach out to loved ones for support. Many family members and friends may be unsure of how to help when a patient is undergoing treatment, however, they are longing to be able to provide some sort of assistance. Don’t be reluctant to request help with transportation or other needs.
  4. Consider holding a community fundraiser. Many families underestimate the cost of medical care and all that comes with it. Reality can hit when they are fully involved in the treatment process. Fundraisers are a great way to reach out to community members and request assistance. This assistance can then be used to help cover the extra expenses of transportation to a treatment facility or lodging away from home.
  5. Reach out to a social worker at the clinic where you or your family member receives treatment. There may be additional resources or discounts through community agencies that offer further support when a patient or family must travel

Finally, if you have to stay at a hotel during medical treatment, be sure to bring along some special items that will remind you of home. Photos, a cozy blanket and a favorite sweatshirt can help make home feel a whole lot closer. Click to learn more about available resources at Winship for our patients and families.

About Joy McCall, LCSW

Joy McCallJoy McCall is a Winship social worker with bone marrow transplant, hematology and gynecologic teams and their patients. She started her professional career at Winship as an intern, working with breast, gynecologic, brain and melanoma cancer patients. She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Kennesaw State University and a Master of Social Work from the University of Georgia. As part of her education she completed an internship with the Marcus Institute working on the pediatric feeding unit, and an internship counseling individuals and couples at Families First, supporting families and children facing challenges to build strong family bonds and stability for their future. She had previously worked with individuals with developmental disabilities for over 4 years, providing support to families and caregivers.

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Lung Cancer Progress Made, But We’re Not There Yet

Lung Cancer (This blog was originally posted on September 29, 2014 on the American Association for Cancer Research website)

Luther Terry, the ninth Surgeon General of the United States, released his now seminal Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the United States on Jan. 11, 1964. The report, assembled by a brave and committed panel of independent physicians and scientists, definitively concluded that lung cancer and chronic bronchitis are causally related to cigarette smoking.

Fifty years later, genomic discovery and the rapidly accelerating fields of epigenetics, proteomics, metabolomics, and drug discovery have presented an armada of new options for patients with lung cancer. Computed tomography (CT) screening of high-risk individuals, particularly smokers, helps detect the disease in its early, more-curable stages more than 80 percent of the time. Breakthroughs in cancer immunology have led to the accelerated development of PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors, demonstrating remarkable and durable benefits in early clinical trials of lung cancer patients with advanced disease. But in 2014, five-year survival remains under 20 percent for patients diagnosed with lung cancer and more than 1.5 million people worldwide will die of lung cancer. Moreover, smoking rates, while down to 19 percent in the U.S., remain well over 30 percent in much of the rest of the world.

Despite the armada of new targeted medicines, cure remains elusive for the vast majority of patients diagnosed with this dreaded illness, and a significant number of never-smokers seem to contract this disease without any known risk factors. So why are we optimistic that major progress made in science can meaningfully impact lung cancer?

2014 has seen major strides in lung cancer research and treatment. Smoking cessation efforts have accelerated with the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) increased abilities to enforce regulations on tobacco products. Our understanding of lung cancer biology grows exponentially by the day. A number of exciting trials have been launched this year to test targeted agents in the adjuvant, postoperative setting, as well for therapy of patients with advanced stage disease. Exciting clinical trials have led to the approval of second- and third-generation agents targeting oncogene-driven tumors. A major initiative has been launched to target RAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in all cancer, and a major driver of outcomes in lung cancer.

Substantial progress has been achieved this year in targeted therapy, stereotactic radiation, and immunotherapy of lung cancer. Collaborative work demonstrated that patients with metastatic lung cancer who were treated successfully by targeting their oncogenic drivers do better than individuals who were treated with standard approaches across several centers of excellence, and that work needs to be successfully translated in the community for all patients with lung cancer in the coming years. While emergence of resistance, triggered through enhanced survival signaling circuits, is inevitable in these highly complex tumors, our understanding of these escape circuits is accelerating rapidly. We are learning to combine improved imaging methods with superior technology to detect circulating tumor cells in order to identify and treat patients with disease earlier than ever before.

However, we have yet to show we can successfully intervene in lung carcinogenesis. In a large trial that we performed in the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group, we found that natural compounds are incapable of reversing the damage caused by ongoing tobacco smoke. We must ally smoking cessation and early detection, and enhance our understanding of the cause of disease in never-smokers. We need to develop potent but tolerable compounds that can reverse premalignant lesions in former smokers.

While the 2009 Tobacco Control Act has enhanced the FDA’s ability to regulate tobacco products in some key areas, such as marketing to minors, major obstacles regarding the regulation of cigars, water pipes, menthol, and particularly e-cigarettes have limited the FDA’s ability to more effectively regulate the menace of Big Tobacco. Indeed, the booming electronic cigarettes industry threatens to enable a whole new generation of smokers. Unless we act decisively to carefully regulate the use of e-cigarettes, the steady progress made in lung cancer research and therapy over the past few decades could be eroded. It is only when we effectively reduce smoking by enforcing the FDA’s control of all products and implementing tobacco control programs with real teeth while simultaneously unraveling and preventing the causes of lung cancer in never-smokers that we will truly start to make an impact, fulfilling Surgeon General Terry’s and, most importantly, our patients’ goals to make lung cancer a disease of prior generations, and a scourge no more.

About Dr. Khuri

Fadlo Khuri, MDFadlo R. Khuri, MD, deputy director of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Hematology & Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, is a leading researcher and physician in the treatment of lung and head and neck cancers. He is Editor-in-Chief of the American Cancer Society’s peer-reviewed journal, Cancer.

Dr. Khuri’s contributions have been recognized by a number of national awards, including the prestigious 2013 Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award, given to an outstanding cancer researcher by the American Association for Cancer Research.

An accomplished molecular oncologist and translational thought leader, Dr. Khuri has conducted seminal research on oncolytic viral therapy, developed molecular-targeted therapeutic approaches for lung and head and neck tumors combining signal transduction inhibitors with chemotherapy, and has led major chemoprevention efforts in lung and head and neck cancers. Dr. Khuri’s clinical interests include thoracic and head and neck oncology. His research interests include development of molecular, prognostic, therapeutic, and chemopreventive approaches to improve the standard of care for patients with tobacco related cancers. His laboratory is investigating the mechanism of action of signal transduction inhibitors in lung and aerodigestive track cancers.

Winship’s Win the Fight 5K Exceeds Fundraising Goal to Help Battle Cancer

Winship Win the Fight 5K RecapThis past weekend,  Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University raised a record amount of money towards cancer research in Georgia. Fundraising support, through the 4th annual Winship Win the Fight 5K, which was held on Saturday, September 27, 2014, surpassed its half-million dollar goal and brought in more than $582,000. Over three thousand runners and walkers gathered Saturday morning to participate in the event that started and ended on the Emory campus and wound its way through the surrounding Druid Hills-area.

“We are so grateful to all the supporters who joined us at this year’s Winship 5K,” says Walter J. Curran, Jr., MD, executive director of Winship. “The money raised will support more than a dozen cancer research projects at Winship and will lead us to more and more success stories in our fight against cancer.”

The Winship Win the Fight 5K is a unique event because it allows participants to select the specific area(s) of cancer research they want their tax-deductible donations to benefit. Donations are still being accepted until November 14, 2014. For more information, visit the Winship Win the Fight 5K website.

And make sure to mark your calendars for the 5th annual Winship Win the Fight 5K, which will be held on Saturday, October 3, 2015.

Winship Win the Fight 5K

Winship Fight 5KThe Winship Win the Fight 5K is this Saturday, September 27, 2014 and already a HALF A MILLION DOLLARS has been raised towards cancer research at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

There’s still time to be a part of this special event! Today is the last day to register online for Saturday’s event. If you cannot be present to run or walk this weekend, register as a “Sleep-In Warrior” to support cancer research from wherever you will be this weekend.

For more information, or to register, visit the Winship Win the Fight 5K website. Also, check out this inspiring video below featuring WSB-TV’s Mark Winne’s wife, Kate, a cancer survivor and Winship patient. Mark and Kate’s story not only shows the crucial role cancer research plays in the continuous fight for a world without cancer, but also the hope it beings to patients and families, here and now.

Related Resources:

Cancer Researchers, Patients Support Winship 5K Side-by-Side
Why I Run: To Raise Awareness & Funding For My Dad’s Cancer
Running to Carry Forth a Father’s Passion to Make a Difference…

Winship Named a Top Ranked Cancer Program in the U.S.

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory UniversityWinship Cancer Institute of Emory University has been named as one of the top 25 best cancer center programs in the nation according to the latest U.S. News & World Report. The annual list ranks cancer care at Emory University Hospital, through Winship, the 24th best in the country, a 20-position jump from 2013.

When Winship Cancer Institute opened its doors in 1937, the mission was to create a facility that would bring researchers and physicians together under one roof so no Georgian would have a reason to leave the state to receive cancer care. Today, Winship sees over 14,000 patients a year who travel from all over the world seeking progressive cancer treatment and integrated, specialized patient-and family-centered care.

As the only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in Georgia, Winship joins an elite group of cancer centers offering access to multidisciplinary cancer care and a wide variety of clinical trials often not available elsewhere.

“We are so proud to be named one of the best cancer centers in the U.S.,” says Walter J. Curran, Jr., MD, executive director of Winship. “The top ranking is a tribute to the hard work and dedication of our outstanding physicians, nurses and other caregivers.”

Winship is the only cancer program in Georgia to be named in the top 50 in the country. Click here for more information about the rankings and make sure to check out where all our Emory hospitals landed on the rankings!