Posts Tagged ‘winship 5k’

Winship Win The Fight 5K – Saturday, October 13th

Winship 5K on FacebookThe Winship Win the Fight 5K Run/Walk is a family-friendly event that will raise critical funds for cancer research, treatment and care at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. Everyone who has been impacted by cancer is encouraged to participate.

For the second year in a row, nine-time NBA All-Star and Hall of Fame inductee Dominique Wilkins will serve as the grand marshal of the Winship Win the Fight 5K. “It was a thrill to help more than 3,500 Winship 5K participants reach their $1 million fundraising goal last year and I’m ready to do it again,” says Wilkins.

Raising Funds for the Latest Advances in Cancer Research

The Winship Win the Fight 5K is Saturday, October 13th and already almost half a million dollars has been raised towards cancer research at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

There’s still time to be a part of this special event! If you cannot be present to run or walk this weekend, register as a “Sleep-In Warrior” to support cancer research from wherever you will be that weekend.

Register to Participate

We can’t wait to see all of you at the start line and to help us support cancer research at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. Sign up today, visit winship5k.emory.edu!

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Comprehensive Cancer Center for Georgia, the highest designation given by the NCI to cancer centers in the nation. Winship offers expertise in cancer research, prevention, detection and treatment with the most advanced therapies. Winship is where you get treatments years before others can. Our expert team coordinates every detail of your visit to meet your individualized treatment plan. Visit emoryhealthcare.org/cancer or call 1-888-WINSHIP for an appointment.

 

Running to Carry Forth a Father’s Passion to Make a Difference…

The Winship Win the Fight 5K brings together runners and supporters who participate for a wide variety of reasons. Some run to raise awareness for the importance of cancer funding and research, while others participate to honor the legacy of loved ones who are either currently in the fight against cancer, or those who have lost the battle.

Charles Stevens with daughters

Chandra Stephens-Albright & Charlita Stephens-Walker with their father, Charles.

For Chandra Stephens-Albright and Charlita Stephens-Walker, this weekend’s race is extremely important as the sisters prepare to run for a very special person, their father, Charles R. Stephens. “His name was Charles, his legacy is never giving up, and his leadership was, and remains, in raising funds to do good,” said Chandra about her father who passed away from complications of pancreatic cancer in February 2013.

Charles spent his professional career as a fundraising leader, serving in senior development positions at many educational institutions including his alma mater, Morehouse College. Other places of work included Dillard University, Clark College, Clark Atlanta University, Indiana University Center on Philanthropy and The Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta. He also served as the national campaign director for the United Negro College Fund (UNCF).

But Charles’s impact goes far beyond the institutions and organizations for which he served his professional time raising funds. Today, his legacy extends nationally to the individuals who shared his passion for fundraising. As the first African American Chair of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), a prestigious and international fundraising association, Charles dedicated his life to changing the fundraising industry from the inside out.

A passage from the AFP’s tribute to Charles following his passing captures it all: “Charles’s lifetime passion was to merge philanthropy and diversity (which he saw as nearly the same ideas) and introduce people of diverse backgrounds to the profession he calls ‘inclusive, noble, and worthwhile.’ His efforts changed the way the fundraising community looks at diversity, brought countless women and minorities into the profession and earned him the AFP Chair’s Award for Outstanding Service, an honor that has been granted to less than 20 people since it was instituted in 1982.”

The Chair’s Award was given to Charles during the AFP’s national conference in 2011, which was shortly after Charles had been diagnosed with cancer. Chandra and Charlita accompanied their father to the conference in Chicago, where they learned for the first time the full scope of Charles’s impact on the entire fundraising profession.

“He was a rock star, but to us he had never said so,” said Chandra, a 1985 Emory College alumna. She adds, “My sister and I did not really understand his national contribution until this cancer came along. It is this that establishes the groundwork for our Winship 5K team name – Charles’ Legacy Leaders.”

During his battle with cancer, Charles continued to live life fully by not only continuing to work at his passion, but by taking special vacations and spending quality time with his family, friends and peers.

“I can’t do justice to my father’s spirit with words,” Chandra said. “Not only did he undergo multiple rounds of chemo, but he did so while maintaining his positive spirit and his irrepressible sense of humor. We had two fantastic years to spend with him – years we didn’t think we’d have – in large part due to the fantastic care he got from the team at Winship.”

At the Winship 5K, there is no shortage of inspirational stories like Charles’s to be found. Incredible people like the Stephen sisters are joining in the fight against cancer to honor those who have gone before and made an impact on the world. If you would like to donate to the Winship 5K, contribute to the Charles Legacy Leaders team, or sign-up for the race yourself, please visit our Winship 5K website for more information.

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Why We Run: A New Type of Togetherness

Bari Ellen & Charles RossBari Ellen and Charles Roberts always had a strong marriage. Togetherness was a major goal for the couple, who married in late midlife. Their shared experience of running a restaurant together, traveling together and moving across country to Arizona for a new life adventure strengthened their bond.

Their togetherness took a wayward turn in 2009, however, when the husband and wife were each diagnosed with cancer within two days of one another. Charles had been sick for months, but doctors couldn’t determine what was wrong. Bari Ellen, who was feeling great physically, had gone to yet another doctor’s appointment with her husband. Charles suggested to the doctor that perhaps he just had an infection, as his wife seemed to have an infection, too.

“She’s got a lump on her neck. Maybe we both just have an infection,” Charles said.

The doctor took one look at the lump on Bari Ellen’s neck and said, “Make an appointment with the receptionist tomorrow.” It was a good thing that she did.

“They did a biopsy, and the doctor told me I had head and neck cancer and that it was pretty far gone. He said he didn’t know what he could do for me,” Bari Ellen remembered.

Her cancer was staged at 4B and the prognosis was poor. Two days after Bari Ellen received her bad news, lab results for Charlie came back announcing that he had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or ALL.

“We were in a swirl,” Bari Ellen said. “It just came out of nowhere.”

Within a week, Bari Ellen went to Atlanta at the suggestion of her daughter, who works at Emory, to get a second opinion. Her daughter had told her that maybe the couple could find hope and better news at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

“Once we got to Winship and saw their compassion and dedication and their sense of purpose, we got a sense of purpose and hope, too,” Bari Ellen said. “They gave us an action plan; they didn’t just write me off. We knew we had a fight before us, but we knew we could win it.”

Today, as survivors for four years, the Rosses are retired, enjoying grandchildren, exercising, volunteering and taking care to eat healthfully. They are also running races and this year, both of them are registered for the Winship Win the Fight 5K on October 5th. The couple have formed a team called the Ross Re-Missionaries, and are recruiting as many friends and family members as they can.

“After everything we’ve been through, and after everything they’ve done, I said ‘We’re going to start giving back,’” Bari Ellen said.

The randomness of their diagnoses helps the Rosses to understand the importance of cancer research, which is another reason they strongly support the Winship Win the Fight 5K. All money goes to cancer research at Winship and donors can choose a specific cancer type to which they would like to contribute.

“Our doctors were so phenomenal and did so much for us that we want to do whatever we can,” Bari Ellen said. “They saved our lives.”

The Winship Win the Fight 5K is fast upon us! If you want to run or simply help support other runners like the Roberts, visit the Winship 5K website for more information.

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Why I Run: To Raise Awareness & Funding For My Dad’s Cancer

Nething Family Melanoma Patient StoryWhen Sarah Nething learned that her father’s melanoma had come back, she knew it was time to take charge in the fight against cancer. “When cancer comes, you feel kind of helpless,” says Sarah. “Our family believes very strongly in the power of prayer, but you still feel like you want to do something.” And Sarah is doing something. As the oldest of ten children and a graduate student in South Carolina, Sarah has set up a team for the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s Win the Fight 5K Run/Walk.

“I can’t take away my dad’s cancer; however, I can participate in something that raises research money to help the doctors try to figure out how to stop it,” says Sarah. So on October 5, Sarah and other members of the Nething family will run the 5K in their father’s honor. Their team – Race for Matt – is running to not only raise general awareness, but also funds for Winship’s Melanoma & Skin Cancer Fund. The Winship Melanoma & Skin Cancer Fund is one of 18 funds which Winship 5K participants can direct their donations to.

In preparing for the upcoming race, Sarah has yet to lose any motivation. “A friend of ours describes how our family feels perfectly when he says ‘Trust God completely, fight cancer aggressively.’ That’s exactly what we plan to do,” she concludes.

If you are interested in learning more about the Win the Fight 5K, want to run or simply help support other runners like the Nething family, visit the Winship 5K website for more information.

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Cancer Researchers, Patients Support Winship 5K Side-by-Side

Winship 5K on FacebookOne of the most inspiring parts of Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s Win the Fight 5K race is seeing physicians and researchers run alongside their patients. In fact, many members of the Winship care team turn out on race day to support the cause, and many even host their own teams. Among these participants is Donald Harvey, PharmD, and director of Winship’s Phase I Clinical Trials Unit.

Dr. Harvey and other researchers in the Phase I unit work with volunteer participants to test the safety of new drugs and treatments and identify possible side effects. Winship’s Phase I Center is one of only two such units in Georgia and by far the largest and busiest, with 38 trials conducted in 2011 and research that has led to four drugs in the FDA approval pipeline. These drugs will hopefully go on to cure people of cancer or extend their lives for many years.

Winship Cancer Institute Patients Participate in 5K Relay for Be The Match

A few days before the 2013 Be The Match Walk+Run 5K that took place on Saturday, June 15, bone marrow transplant patients, family members and staff at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University conducted their own 5-kilometer relay in the transplant ward of Emory University Hospital. Since some participants couldn’t walk the entire circuit, most walked as long as they could before passing the baton off to the next person. Sixty-six laps around the transplant ward equaled five kilometers.

Bone marrow transplant patients and their family members often experience long weeks (and sometimes even months) of treatment.

“[The relay] is fun and it gives people an idea that they are not losing so much or giving up so much by being here, and they can still participate in things. Also, it’s a way for them to give back. It’s a way for all of us to give back,” says Amelia Langston, MD, medical director of the Emory Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplant Center.

Learn more about the Winship Cancer Institute Bone Marrow Transplant Program by watching the video below, or by using the related resources links provided below the video.

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