Posts Tagged ‘multiple myeloma clinical trial’

Treatment for Multiple Myeloma at Emory – Real Patient Story

Meet these real-life Multiple myeloma patients and learn about treatment for Multiple Myeloma at EmoryWhen Cathy Mooney was first diagnosed with multiple myeloma, the myeloma program at Winship was just beginning to take off. Today, the center provides treatment for multiple myeloma to 400 to 500 new patients a year, with about 1,600 multiple myeloma patients overall. More than 200 Winship patients participate in the Phase I Clinical Trials Unit directed by Donald Harvey.

“That’s a huge group that we are able to see in one city,” says Ajay Nooka, assistant professor of hematology and medical oncology and part of the hematology care team at Winship. In addition to caring for patients, Nooka, who specializes in cancer epidemiology, structures and oversees many of Winship’s clinical trials and assesses their outcomes.

The large patient population and high rate of clinical trial enrollment is a gold mine of data for researchers.

“The ultimate goal is to see where we stand in terms of treatment for multiple myeloma progress and what changes we can make to further improvements in patient outcomes,” Nooka says.
Another advantage for Winship’s multiple myeloma team is Atlanta’s large population of African Americans, who are twice as likely as the white population to be diagnosed with the disease.

“The difference between us and other centers is that a lot of our patients are our neighbors,” Lonial says. “A lot of the game in clinical trials is not just, are you able to do them, but do you have the patients? The growth for us has stemmed from access to new drugs and access to patients. That’s a big reason why we had four drugs approved last year as a part of treatment for multiple myeloma.”

In November, the FDA approved elotuzumab as part of an innovative immune-based therapy treatment for patients with relapsed multiple myeloma. That was the third myeloma drug approved by the FDA within the previous month and the fourth approved within the last year.

That’s good news for patients like Quincy Washington, who was 42 when he was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2007.

At first his doctor suspected rheumatoid arthritis, but then sent Washington to an oncologist, where he learned about myeloma for the first time. The disease typically strikes African American men at a younger age than any other patient group.

“The doctor said, you have multiple myeloma. I said, okay. What do we do next?” Washington remembers. “She looked at my wife and said, is he in shock? And my wife said no, that’s pretty much his personality. I don’t really do the whole gloom-and-doom perspective.”

Washington happened to have a friend who specializes in oncology at Winship, and that’s how he discovered that he could get the most leading-edge care within miles of his home in Lithonia. He began treatment for multiple myeloma immediately, including enrollment in a clinical trial.

Now in long-term remission, Washington says, “My plan is to be cured. At some point, my numbers will be zero. When it comes to age, I’m a triple-digit kind of guy.”

Winship Cancer Institute Celebrates 2015 as a Banner Year

Ranked first in Georgia for cancer care, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University offers patients with access to progressive resources, technology and cancer treatment options through Georgia’s largest health care system Emory Healthcare. As Georgia’s first and only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, Winship is a national leader in seeking out new ways to defeat cancer and in translating that knowledge into patient care.

Key 2015 Highlights:

  • For the second year in a row, Winship was ranked as a top 25 cancer program nationwide, moving up from 24th to 22nd nationally, and as best in Georgia by U.S. News & World Report.
  • Winship expanded staff and services this year at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory John’s Creek Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown.
  • Winship’s clinical trials program enrolled more patients on trials than in any other year and contributed to the approval of four new therapies for multiple myeloma.
  • Winship exceeded its fundraising goal for the Win the Fight 5K in September, bringing in more than $778,000 for cancer research.

Read the full transcript of the video here.

Winship key to four new myeloma drugs in 2015

lonial patientThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved elotuzumab as part of an innovative immune-based therapy treatment for patients with relapsed multiple myeloma. This is the third myeloma drug approved by the FDA within the last month and the fourth new myeloma treatment approved within the last year. All four new agents were tested in clinical trials at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

Sagar Lonial, MD, chief medical officer of Winship, says the potential of elotuzumab can be seen in the overall response rate as well as the longer duration of progression-free survival.

“The Winship multiple myeloma team has shepherded several of these treatments from the beginning stages of testing through to their approval,” said Lonial. “It’s a great source of pride to know we were instrumental in the process that has led to many more treatment options for our patients.”

Read the full press release here.

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