Posts Tagged ‘md chat’

Takeaways from Dr. Cohen’s “Advancements in Breast Imaging” Live Chat

Thank you to everyone who joined us for last week’s live web chat on “Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection.” Dr. Michael Cohen, director, Division of Breast Imaging for Emory’s Department of Radiology, discussed the latest in breast imaging screening and technology.

Questions varied from ,“What are the current breast screening guidelines?” to “What is tomosynthesis and when is it the right choice for screening?” Below are just a few of the questions and answers from the chat. Make sure to view the chat transcript for the whole discussion.

Question: What are the current breast cancer screening guidelines?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
Women aged 40 and younger should have a clinical breast exam at least every 3 years. All women aged 40 and over should get a yearly screening mammogram, clinical breast exam and perform a monthly breast self-examination.

 

Question:
When is breast tomosynthesis the right choice for screening? And how does tomosynthesis compare to an MRI in diagnosing cancer?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
Digital Tomosynthesis (3D mammography) is an improvement on traditional 2D mammography. Rather than the traditional single view of a breast in 2D mammography, 3D mammography obtains a series of very thin 1 mm sections of the breast. This allows us to look at the breast as if we were viewing pages of a book and gives a much more accurate look inside. If tomosynthesis is available at your breast imaging facility, it is an excellent way to screen.

Studies have shown that 3D mammography permits detections of more cancers, while at the same time reducing the number of unnecessary call-backs to evaluate lesions that are not cancer. This is a win-win for the patient. MRI screening is reserved for a limited number of patients at high risk.

Question:
What about the radiation exposure for these types of test [tomosynthesis]; is it different from traditional mammograms?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
With current technology, a patient receives both a 2D and a 3D mammogram at the same time. The addition of 3D about doubles the radiation exposure compared to 2D alone, but is still within FDA guidelines for mammography.

Also, some very exciting technology is on the horizon that will permit us to create a 2D mammogram from a 3D mammogram using sophisticated computers. When that becomes available, we will only need to do a 3D mammogram, thereby reducing the radiation exposure to the original level.

If you missed this informative chat with Dr. Cohen, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript.

If you have any questions for Dr. Cohen, don’t hesitate to leave a comment in our comments area below!

Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection

Advancements in Breast Imaging ChatBreast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). October is Breast Cancer Awareness month and the breast care specialists across Emory Healthcare want you to know the importance of screening and early detection.

The American Cancer Society recommends that women (without breast cancer symptoms), age 40 and older should have a mammogram every year as long as they are in good health. Getting yearly screening mammograms increases the chance of detecting cancers in the early stages, before they start to cause symptoms. By detecting cancer early, screening exams also help increase the chance of survival and lower the risk of mortality.

At Emory Healthcare, we are proud to offer patients with leading breast screening techniques, including the latest in breast imaging technology, called tomosynthesis, or 3D mammography.

Learn more about breast screening guidelines and advancements in breast imaging by joining us on Tuesday, October 21 at 12:00 pm EST for a live web chat on “Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection.” Dr. Michael Cohen, Director, Division of Breast Imaging for Emory’s Department of Radiology, will be available to answer questions such as: what is the latest in breast imaging technology? When should I start getting screened? To register for the chat, click here.

Also, during October, the Emory Breast Imaging Centers are offering extended and weekend hours for women needing a screening mammogram. Dates and details are below:

Extended Hours: Thursday, October 9, Tuesday, October 21, Thrusday October 23; 7:30 a.m – 7:00 p.m. at the Emory Breast Imaging Center on Clifton Road.

Saturday Hours: October 18, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Emory University Hospital Midtown.

Registration: To schedule an appointment, call 404-778-PINK (7465). Standard rates apply.

Chat Details:

Date: Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Time: 12:00- 1:00 pm EST
Chat Leader: Dr. Michael Cohen
Chat Topic: Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection

Chat Sign Up

Takeaways from Dr. Saba’s Head and Neck Cancer Chat

Thanks to everyone who joined us on Tuesday, June 24, for our live online chat on “Risk factors, symptoms and treatment options for head and neck cancer” led by Nabil Saba, MD, Chief of Head and Neck Oncology at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), head and neck cancers account for approximately three percent of all cancers in the U.S. During the chat, Dr. Saba addressed some of your questions relating to risk factors, symptoms and the latest research for head and neck cancer. See all of Dr. Saba’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What are the symptoms of head and neck cancer? How do I know if I need to go get checked out?

Nabil Saba, MDDr. Saba: Symptoms include having a lump in the neck, persistent changes in your voice over time, difficulty swallowing, and unusual pain in the neck/throat area (pain that doesn’t seem to get better with time). These are some common symptoms, so if you’re experiencing any of these, it would probably be a good idea to talk to your physician.

 

Question: Are there particular factors or traits that may pre-dispose a person to head or neck cancers?

Nabil Saba, MDDr. Saba: There are certain well-defined risk factors for head and neck cancer, including a history of smoking or alcohol consumption. It has also been observed that HPV-related oropharynx cancer is increasing in Caucasian males, whereas oral tongue cancer seems to be increasing in Caucasian females. While there is an increased risk of head and neck cancer in these groups of people, it doesn’t necessarily mean you are at high risk if you fall into one of these groups.
 
If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. You can also visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/cancer for more information on cancer treatment at Winship at Emory.

Risk Factors and Symptoms of Head and Neck Cancer

Head and Neck Cancer ChatHead and neck cancer includes a collective group of cancers occurring in the head or neck region, ranging from the nasal cavity and sinuses, to the back of the throat, including the oral cavity, tonsils, base of the tongue, nasopharynx, hypopharynx and larynx.

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), head and neck cancers account for approximately three percent of all cancers in the U.S. Studies show that these cancers are more common in people over the age of 50 and three times more common in men than in women; however, if diagnosed early, head and neck cancer is often curable.

Recently, a growing number of cancers occurring in the base of the tongue and tonsils have been linked to human papillomavirus (HPV), which is already a well known risk factor for cervical cancer in women. HPV-related head and neck cancer is a distinct type of cancer and so far has been diagnosed more in men than women.

Join Nabil Saba, MD, Chief of Head and Neck Oncology at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, as he hosts a live chat on “Risk Factors, Symptoms and Treatment Options for Head and Neck Cancer.” Dr. Saba will be available to answer all of your questions such as:

  • What are the known risk factors linked to head and neck cancer?
  • What are the symptoms of head and neck cancer?
  • How is head and neck cancer diagnosed?
  • Can head and neck cancer be prevented?

Chat Details:

Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Time: 12:30- 1:30 pm EST
Chat Leader: Dr. Nabil Saba
Chat Topic: Risk Factors, Symptoms and Treatment Options for Head and Neck Cancer

Chat Sign Up

How We’re Working to Cure Multiple Myeloma

Over the past ten years, I have seen the treatment of multiple myeloma dramatically improve because of new drug therapies that have come out of clinical trials. I am now leading a clinical study to learn more about the genetic components of multiple myeloma and how we can use that knowledge to come up with better, more targeted drugs and individualized therapies for patients. I think this landmark study will lead to treatments that effect long-term remission, or even cure, from the cancer.

In the CoMMpass study, launched by the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, we will follow 1,000 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma over the course of eight years. We will study the genomic changes in their disease while they receive frontline treatments, and continue studying those changes through remission stages or relapse. One of the questions we hope to answer is why some patients do well on a specific drug, while others do not and may need multiple drugs to keep their myeloma from advancing.

The first step in the study is mapping out the molecular characterization of a patient’s tumor using sequencing at the time of initial diagnosis, and then following what happens in the sequencing information during and after treatment. If the disease comes back, we want to know if there were changes in the disease or new mutations that were influenced by the therapy or by the original mutations themselves?

As we learn more about cancer and its various types, we do less lumping them together and more splitting them into individual diseases. Lymphoma is a good example. It used to be that the disease was characterized as six or seven different types, and now we know there are at least 50 different variations of lymphoma. We look at the molecular characterization of lymphoma and create subtypes that are potentially treated in different ways. We may need to do that in myeloma. In the CoMMpass study, we will be able to have individual tumor specimens molecularly sequenced, which has never been done before, and we will learn much more about the cancer and its number of subtypes.

We are also looking at the impact of side effects on quality of life issues in this trial. There may be molecular characteristics of a patient’s tumor that can tell us whether that patient will have side effects from a specific treatment, so mapping a patient’s molecular subtype might influence the type of drugs he gets.

We have seen the life expectancy of multiple myeloma patients double in the last ten years. I think that there are probably some patients we are curing now and I believe that CoMMpass will help us to identify the best drugs and the best targets to increase the cure rate in this disease. We hope this study will help push the barrier to cure even further, but do it in a way that does not compromise a patient’s quality of life.

To learn more, watch this video as Dr. Lonial further explains Multiple Myeloma and treatment options for the diease.

Multiple Myeloma Online Chat

Multiple Myeloma Chat Sign UpWant to learn more about multiple myeloma? Join expert physician, Jonathan Kaufman, MD, for a live web chat on March 11, 2014 at 12:00 PM EST. Dr. Kaufman will be there to answers all your questions about known risks, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma. Bring your questions and prepare for a great discussion!

Multiple Myeloma Chat Sign Up

About Dr. Sagar Lonial

Dr. Sagar LonialDr. Lonial is Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs for the Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, and Director of the Translational Research for the B-Cell Malignancy Program. He is also a professor in the Emory University School of Medicine.

Dr. Lonial’s research focuses on combination therapy in B-cell malignancies focusing on myeloma. He is a trained bone marrow transplant physician with an interest in molecular therapy for lymphoma and myeloma. His clinical interests include evaluating the combination of new molecular targeted agents for B-cell tumors as well as target discovery and validation.

Dr. Lonial has authored or coauthored over 200 publications and recently was awarded the Celgene ‘Young Investigator’ Award, the MMRF ‘Top 15 Innovator’ Award, and the MMRC ‘Center of the Year’ award.

He earned his medical degree from the University Of Louisville School Of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, followed by a fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Related Links
Understanding Multiple Myeloma
Phase I Trials – Where All Anticancer Drugs Begin

 

Understanding Multiple Myeloma

While still a relatively uncommon cancer, multiple myeloma has recently received attention surrounding the diagnosis of popular news reporter, Tom Brokaw. This year, an estimated 24,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with multiple myeloma, and there are about 77,600 people now living with this blood cancer.

About Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a type of cancer that forms because of a disorder in the plasma cells, which live in the bone marrow and are the producers of antibodies. These antibodies are what provide protection from infections after vaccination, but in myeloma, the plasma cells become malignant and grow out of control, crowding out the normal bone marrow.

When plasma cells grow uncontrolled by the normal immune system, the consequences can include:

  • Anemia, a condition caused by low red blood cell counts due to crowding in the bone marrow.
  • Bone lesions, as myeloma cells like to create “holes” in the bones.
  • Kidney problems, because the antibodies produced by the plasma cells can clog up the kidneys.
  • Elevated blood calcium level, typically as a consequence of the bone issues.

Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

The most common symptoms for patients are typically fatigue, weakness, bone pain, anemia, or frequent unexplained infections. Multiple myeloma affects both men and women but is more common in men and there is a higher occurrence of multiple myeloma among African Americans than among Caucasians.  It is a disease typically seen in patients who are older than age 65, although it occurs in African-American patients about ten years earlier, and it affects a fair number of younger patients.

Multiple Myeloma Treatment

Treatment for patients with multiple myeloma has changed dramatically over the past decade. As we have developed more effective drugs to target the plasma cells, we also have significantly improved overall survival. Fifteen years ago, the average survival was 3 to 4 years, whereas the average survival is now over 7 years, and for many patients, expected survival is more than 10 years.

The keys to this improvement in overall survival are related to several factors. First, we have better tools to combat myeloma. There have been 6 new drugs approved for treating myeloma over the past decade, and these agents are more effective at treating the disease than the standard mixtures of chemotherapy we had before. The second factor that has improved survival for certain patients is the use of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, in which the patient’s own stem cells are given back to the patient’s body after receiving high-dose chemotherapy. Finally, we now have a better understanding of the biological changes that occur in a myeloma cell and this is helping us to better target treatment needed among these patients.

As we discover new tools and expand the options available for treating multiple myeloma, we see encouraging advancements in both survival and quality of life for these patients. The multidisciplinary treatment team at Winship at Emory has been recognized as a national and international leader in both transplant and non-transplant based approaches to treatment therapies, patient outcomes and clinical trials.

Multiple Myeloma Online Chat

Multiple Myeloma Chat Sign UpWant to learn more about multiple myeloma? Join expert physician, Jonathan Kaufman, MD, for a live web chat on March 11, 2014 at 12:00 PM EST. Dr. Kaufman will be there to answers all your questions about known risks, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma. Bring your questions and prepare for a great discussion!

Multiple Myeloma Chat Sign Up

About Dr. Sagar Lonial

Dr. Sagar LonialDr. Lonial is Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs for the Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, and Director of the Translational Research for the B-Cell Malignancy Program. He is also a professor in the Emory University School of Medicine.

Dr. Lonial’s research focuses on combination therapy in B-cell malignancies focusing on myeloma. He is a trained bone marrow transplant physician with an interest in molecular therapy for lymphoma and myeloma. His clinical interests include evaluating the combination of new molecular targeted agents for B-cell tumors as well as target discovery and validation.

Dr. Lonial has authored or coauthored over 200 publications and recently was awarded the Celgene ‘Young Investigator’ Award, the MMRF ‘Top 15 Innovator’ Award, and the MMRC ‘Center of the Year’ award.

He earned his medical degree from the University Of Louisville School Of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, followed by a fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Though Common, Prostate Cancer is Often Very Treatable – Join Our Q&A Chat for Details

Prostate Cancer Q&A ChatDid you know that prostate cancer is the second most common cancer experienced by men, after skin cancer? The good news is that, when caught early, it can often be treated with great success.

Millions of men are living today as survivors of prostate cancer. Being armed with good information in advance is a key ingredient in protecting yourself or your loved ones from this disease.

Join Emory Chairman of the Department of Urology, Dr. Martin Sanda, on Tuesday, September 24, for an online web chat to discuss “Prostate Cancer.”

Prostate Cancer Chat Sign Up

Dermatologist #1 Skin Care Rule – Wear Sunscreen!

Melanoma Web MD ChatIt’s almost summer time, and many of us are already spending more time outside enjoying the warm weather. Most of us don’t consider the consequences of increased sun exposure on our skin, even indirect exposure. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, with about one million new cases every year. The three common forms of skin cancer are distinguished by the types of cells affected: melanoma, basal cell and squamous cell. While melanoma is less common than basal and squamous cell cancers, it is the most dangerous. If caught early, melanoma can be treated; however, if left untreated, melanoma can spread to other parts of the body.

What is Melanoma?

Melanoma is a cancer of melanocytes, which are cells whose primary function is to make pigment. These cells are located in the layers of epidermis, or the outer layer of skin. Melanocytes are also responsible for making birthmarks and freckles; however, in those cases, the cells are not cancerous. Melanomas can form on any part of the skin but are most commonly found on the chest and back in men, and the legs in women. Melanomas can also develop on the neck and face, and they sometimes occur in the eye and in mucosal surfaces, such as the mouth and bowel.

Why do dermatologists recommend applying sunscreen daily?

Skin cancer is most commonly a result of excessive exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. The sun contains two types of these rays: UVB, which are responsible for sunburns, and UVA, which cause cell aging and long-term skin damage. Both rays cause damage to skin cells’ DNA, resulting in abnormal cell growth. Here are some tips to protect your skin from the sun’s harsh rays and prevent skin cancer:

  • Use a broad spectrum SPF of a level 15 or higher, which is a type of sunscreen that protects the skin from both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Avoid outdoor activity between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun’s rays are most intense.• Wear protective clothing as well as a hat and sunglasses to protect more sensitive parts of the body.
  • Remember, the UV rays can go through light clothing, windshields, windows, and clouds.
  • While shade offers some protection, the sun’s UV rays can still penetrate through clouds and trees and have harmful effects.

Check yourself!

Remember, skin cancer is generally treatable if detected early. If you haven’t done so, give your body a quick scan, and repeat this practice at least once a month. Get to know the pattern of moles, spots, freckles, and other marks on your skin. If you notice any new moles or changes in shape or color to existing ones, please contact your healthcare provider.

Have additional questions? Join Dr. Suephy Chen on May 14, 2012 at 11:30 AM EST for a live online discussion about diagnosing and treating melanoma.

For more information about melanoma and other skin cancers, visit Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

Related Resources:

Raising Lymphedema Awareness in Honor of “D” Day

Lymphedema Web ChatMarch 6 marks the official awareness day around one of the least understood but most commonly faced conditions among cancer patients—Lymphedema. If you’re unfamiliar with the term, you’re not alone. Essentially, Lymphedema is a condition that occurs when the lymph system is blocked or impeded, which results in the build up of fluid in the body’s soft tissue. This fluid buildup results in swelling–usually in the arms and legs–which is the most common symptom of Lymphedema. Lymphedema can be genetic, but it is often caused as a result of some cancers and their respective treatments. In regards to the latter, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), “Lymphedema is one of the most poorly understood, relatively underestimated, and least researched complications of cancer or its treatment.”

Because of the relatively high frequency of Lymphedema among cancer patients and its implications for potential decline in patients’ quality of life, Lymphedema is a condition that clinicians and survivorship programs have begun to place a larger emphasis on.  In the spirit of raising awareness around Lymphedema and helping those who suffer from it and the family members supporting them better understand it, Lymphedema therapist, Stephanie Kirkpatrick, of the Winship Cancer Institute will be holding an online chat on the topic of Lymphedema on “D” Day*.

Stephanie will cover Lymphedema causes, types, treatments, and coping strategies and answer questions from participants during the chat, which takes place on Tuesday, March 6 at noon EST.

*UPDATE: View the Lymphedema chat transcript.

 

 

Lung Cancer MD Chat Follow-up Questions Answered

Dr. Taofeek Owonikoko

Dr. Taofeek Owonikoko

Dr. Kristin Higgins

Dr. Kristin Higgins

Doctors Kristin Higgins and Taofeek Owonikoko held a live web chat on the topic of lung cancer this month. From that chat, there were several unanswered questions that we wanted to circle back with the answers for. You’ll find them below in a Q&A format. If you’re interested in checking out the rest of the conversation from the chat, check out the lung cancer chat transcript.

Rhonda asked: Is there any lung cancer treatment program for people without health insurance?

Dr. Owonikoko: Depending on where this person resides, the state may have a program for indigent cancer patients. Also, the American Cancer Society has some patient support programs for indigent patients to support cancer care. Here is the webpage to the support options on the ACS website.

Marjorie asked: My sister has been treated this year for non-small cell lung cancer in the RUL, that was inoperable. she underwent 6 months of radiation and chemotherapy, and has been told that she is now in remission. what are the odds that she will remain in remission for 5 years or more?

Dr. Owonikoko: This is not a medical advice; best to discuss with the treating oncologist. However, depending on the exact stage of the cancer, 20-30% of patients treated with chemoradiation will survive past 5 years.

Marjorie asked: Also, can you comment on outcomes from radiation induced pneumonitis?

Dr. Higgins: Radiation pneumonitis arises in about 20-25% of patients that are treated with radiation and chemotherapy.  It typically resolves with a course of steroids but sometimes requires hospitilization for more intensive monitoring and supplemental oxygen.

Hank asked: There seems to be some controversy about the use of radiation therapy for lung cancer depending on the stege. What are the pro’s and con’s?

Dr. Owonikoko: There is not much controversy about the benefit of radiation for patient with locally advanced lung cancer. The discussion is more about the best way to give the radiation and how much. Radiation is generally not needed for patients with stage I lung cancer of the non small cell subtype but may be useful for symptom palliation in patients with stage IV non small lung cancer.

Dr. Higgins can provide additional insight on the radiation questions.

Dr. Higgins: A form of local therapy is needed to cure lung cancer that has not yet spread to distant sites, whether it be radiation or surgery.  Surgery is the best option for early stage lung cancer.  New techniques of radiation, particularly SBRT, have been used in patients with early stage lung cancer that are not medically fit for surgery. Outcomes have been very good with SBRT, however surgery and SBRT have not been directly compared and surgery remains the standard of care.  There are trials underway that are directly comparing SBRT vs. surgery.
Again I want to stress that surgery remains the standard of care for early stage lung cancer, but pros to SBRT include minimal recovery time and a less invasive procedure.

Do you have other questions for us related to lung cancer? Leave them in the comments below & we’ll be sure to post responses here.