Posts Tagged ‘lung ct scan’

Myths About Tobacco-Related (Bladder) Cancer Go Up in Smoke

Smoking Bladder Cancer RiskMany people think that cigarette smoking causes only lung cancer. If you are one of them, think again.

A study published just this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) finds that risk of developing bladder cancer – for men and women – is higher among smokers than previously believed.

Doctors such as Dr. Viraj Master, associate professor of urology, Emory School of Medicine and director of clinical urology research at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, see patients every week whose cancers likely were caused by smoking.

“Patients are often surprised to hear of the link between smoking and bladder cancer, but it’s there and it’s real,” says Dr. Master. “Smoking’s effects on the body are both pervasive and lethal.”

How could it be that cigarette smoke gets into your bladder? As it turns out, the actual smoke does not, but the carcinogens in tobacco smoke do get into your blood stream and thus into other parts of your body. The study, authored by researchers at the National Cancer Institute, suggests that an apparent increase in the concentration of carcinogens has occurred in the past 50 years, even as tar and nicotine concentrations have been reduced.

Other cancers caused from smoking include: throat, mouth, nasal cavity, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, kidney, bladder, cervix, and acute myeloid leukemia. If you or a loved one would like help to quit smoking, you can call the Georgia Tobacco Quit Line at 877-270-STOP (7867).

Also, if you are a heavy smoker between 55 and 74, you may be interested in having a CT screening of your lungs. Emory University Hospital began offering such scans in early August. A study published this summer in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that low-dose spiral CT scans of heavy smokers aged 55 to 74 reduced mortality by 20 percent. People who are screened need to be aware that false positives may occur and that further testing may be required.

Lung Cancer Risk Reduction via Lung CT Scans Continue to Gain Momentum

Lung CT Screening

Did you know that only 15% of lung cancer patients survive more than 5 years after their cancer has been identified? As Vicki Griffin of the Atlanta Journal Constitution puts it in a recent AJC article on lung cancer, “The bleak bottom line is that lung cancer overwhelmingly terminates lives within months of the initial diagnosis.” But as Dr. Curran of the Winship Cancer Institute reported weeks ago in a lung cancer blog post, this number could be improved. How, you ask? Through low-dose Lung CT scanning.

A recent 5 year study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which is the same organization that has designated the Winship Cancer Institute as one of only 65 NCI designated cancer centers in the United States, shows that when lung adenocarcinomas are caught in earlier, more treatable stages, lung cancer death rates for those at high risk are reduced by 20%. Based on our knowledge that 157,000 people died at the hands of lung cancer in the U.S. in 2010 alone, this means last year, over 31,000 lives could have been saved.

The study evaluated over 53,000 participants at high risk for lung cancer in 25 states, including Georgia. As part of the evaluation of the effectiveness of low-dose Lung CT scans, the study compared the ability for Lung CT screenings and the currently standard chest X-ray technology to identify lung cancer early on.

Emory was a participant in the NCI sponsored study, and we conducted trials across the state of Georgia. As a result of the study’s significant findings, our teams at the Emory Clinic and Emory University Hospital Midtown are now offering current and former smokers with a significant smoking history high risk for lung cancer an opportunity to get a Lung CT scan at very reasonable rates.

Lung cancer remains the number one cancer killer in the U.S., claiming more lives than the next three most common cancer killers — prostate, breast and colorectal cancers – combined. But Lung CT screening may help with the early diagnosis and ultimately, increased survival rates, for lung cancer patients.

For more information on Lung CT scanning, or to find out if you are a candidate for screening, please visit our newly launched website dedicated to educating our community on Lung CT screening and its benefits. You can also call us for more information at 404-778-7777.