Posts Tagged ‘lung cancer treatment’

Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines You Need To Know

Current guidelines state that screening for lung cancer is recommended when all of the following lung cancer screening guidelines are met. Learn more.Did you know that not everyone can actually qualify for lung cancer screening? Current guidelines state that screening for lung cancer is recommended when all of the following lung cancer screening guidelines are met:

  • Age 55-77 years
  • Asymptomatic (no signs or symptoms of lung cancer), no lung infection (pneumonia, bronchitis) within the past 12 weeks
  • Current or former smoker (if former smoker, it is recommended that it has been less than 15 years since quitting)
  • History of cigarette smoking with pack years greater than or equal to 30
  • You have not had a CT of the chest within the last 12 months

How to Calculate “Pack Years”

VIEW ONLINE CALCULATOR

20 cigarettes = 1 Pack

To translate smoking history into “pack years,” simply multiply the number of cigarette packs smoked per day by the number of years smoked.

(# packs per day x # total years smoked = pack years)
For example: 1½ packs a day smoked over a 30-year period = 45 pack years. If an individual has less than a pack per day smoking history, calculate pack years using the formula below.

(# total years smoked x # cigarettes per day) / 20 = pack years
For example: 40-year smoking history, 15 cigarettes per day = 30 pack years

Please note: A physician’s order is required for the Lung CT Scan. If you do not have this information, please make an appointment with your primary care doctor first. If you do not have a primary care doctor, please call 404-778-7777 and a representative will be happy to match you with an Emory provider.

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Lung Cancer Chat Takeaways

lung-chat-260x200According to the American Lung Association, lung cancer is the leading cancer killer in both men and women in the U.S.  At least 8.6 million Americans qualify as high risk for lung cancer and are recommended to receive annual screening with low-dose CT scans. Lung CT Screening for individuals at high risk has the potential to dramatically improve lung cancer survival rates by finding the disease at an earlier, more treatable stage.  At Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, a highly coordinated multidisciplinary team provides advanced care and clinical trials option with cutting edge new therapies for lung cancer patients.

We hosted a live chat with Seth D. Force, MD and Suresh Ramalingam, MD of Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s lung cancer team on Wednesday, January 11 where we answered your questions about lung cancer risk factors, lung CT screening, symptoms and therapy. We received a lot of great questions that our physicians were able to answer. Below are some highlights from live chat, and you can read the full chat transcript here.

Lung Cancer Chat Highlights

Question: Is a chest x-ray the best place to start for screening?

Dr. Force and Dr. Ramalingam: Chest xrays have not been shown to be helpful for lung cancer screening as confirmed by several older clinical trials. For patients at high risk for lung cancer, a chest CT scan is the best screening test.

Question: At what point should a patient seek specialist if diagnosed with nodule

Dr. Force and Dr. Ramalingam:  Any person who is found to have a nodule should seek a specialist. These specialists can include a thoracic surgeon, pulmonologist, or an oncologist specializing in lung cancer. At Winship, our doctors sit down weekly to discuss the specifics cases and use specific guidelines to determine the next step for a patient found to have a lung nodule.

Question:  What are some of lung cancer symptoms that should worry us?

Dr. Force and Dr. Ramalingam: Good question! Most patients who present with early stage lung cancer are asymptomatic. Symptoms that should cause someone to seek medical consultation are persistent cough, chest pain, coughing up blood, difficulty breathing and unexplained weight loss.

 

Thank you to everyone who participated in our lung cancer live chat with Dr. Force and Dr. Ramalingam. Learn more here.

Lung Cancer: Risk Factors, CT Lung Screening, Symptoms & Therapy Live Chat

lung-chat-260x200According to the American Lung Association, lung cancer is the leading cancer killer in both men and women in the U.S.  At least 8.6 million Americans qualify as high risk for lung cancer and are recommended to receive annual screening with low-dose CT scans. Lung CT Screening for individuals at high risk has the potential to dramatically improve lung cancer survival rates by finding the disease at an earlier, more treatable stage.  At Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, a highly coordinated multidisciplinary team provides advanced care and clinical trials option with cutting edge new therapies for lung cancer patients.

Join Seth D. Force, MD and Suresh Ramalingam, MD, with Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s lung cancer team, on Wednesday, January 11 at 12 PM for a live chat where we’ll answer your questions about lung cancer risk factors, lung CT screening, symptoms and therapy. All are welcome to attend this online open-forum discussion.

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CT Lung Screening Real-life Patient Story

Read this real life patient story about Becky whose life was saved by an Emory doctor who performed a timely CT lung screening.This real-life story about an Emory CT lung screening patient is just one example of how ct screening for lung cancer can save a life.

Becky Huff had been seeing radiologists just to follow up on findings of calcification after a mammogram. A CT scan of her breasts detected nodules in her lungs. Now 67, she quit smoking more than two decades ago. Becky was wondering whether working in a smoke-filled office also contributed to her cancer risk.

For the next two years Emory doctors monitored her lungs with CT lung screening every six months. Pulmonologist Gerald Staton led the group. Then, a change in the appearance of the nodules, along with an inconclusive biopsy, led her to consult an Emory thoracic surgeon Allan Pickens. He recommended a unique type of imaging — a PET scan — to gauge the possibility that cancer had spread.

“To me, that was another safeguard that they knew what they needed to do beforehand,” Becky says.

Using two small incisions on the side of Becky’s body, Dr. Pickens removed the upper lobe of her left lung. Two months later, in a similar procedure, he removed a segment from her right lung. When pathologists examined the removed tissue and samples from her lymph nodes, they detected no signs that the tumors had infiltrated the lymph nodes. That meant she could forgo chemotherapy and radiation.

“This is an example of when we were able to get there early, before the cancer has progressed,” Dr. Pickens said.

Becky’s recovery from the surgeries included some pain. She had trouble finding a comfortable sleeping position and needed to take pain medicine for a couple of weeks. Yet, she had avoided surgeries that would open the chest.

“I did get over the surgery a lot quicker than other people that I’ve seen,” Becky said.

Around the time of her surgeries in the spring of 2011, Becky had begun taking piano lessons. While raising five children, she had always wanted to learn to play. Now, five years after her surgeries and a reassuring PET scan this year, she continues to learn piano and stays active with frequent walks on her family’s wooded property in Talbot County, Georgia.

A physician’s order is required for CT lung screening. If you don’t currently have a care provider; you may meet with one of Emory team members to determine if CT lung screening is right for you.

Visit emoryhealthcare.org/lungct to learn more about screening qualifications.

Lung Cancer Progress Made, But We’re Not There Yet

Lung Cancer (This blog was originally posted on September 29, 2014 on the American Association for Cancer Research website)

Luther Terry, the ninth Surgeon General of the United States, released his now seminal Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the United States on Jan. 11, 1964. The report, assembled by a brave and committed panel of independent physicians and scientists, definitively concluded that lung cancer and chronic bronchitis are causally related to cigarette smoking.

Fifty years later, genomic discovery and the rapidly accelerating fields of epigenetics, proteomics, metabolomics, and drug discovery have presented an armada of new options for patients with lung cancer. Computed tomography (CT) screening of high-risk individuals, particularly smokers, helps detect the disease in its early, more-curable stages more than 80 percent of the time. Breakthroughs in cancer immunology have led to the accelerated development of PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors, demonstrating remarkable and durable benefits in early clinical trials of lung cancer patients with advanced disease. But in 2014, five-year survival remains under 20 percent for patients diagnosed with lung cancer and more than 1.5 million people worldwide will die of lung cancer. Moreover, smoking rates, while down to 19 percent in the U.S., remain well over 30 percent in much of the rest of the world.

Despite the armada of new targeted medicines, cure remains elusive for the vast majority of patients diagnosed with this dreaded illness, and a significant number of never-smokers seem to contract this disease without any known risk factors. So why are we optimistic that major progress made in science can meaningfully impact lung cancer?

2014 has seen major strides in lung cancer research and treatment. Smoking cessation efforts have accelerated with the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) increased abilities to enforce regulations on tobacco products. Our understanding of lung cancer biology grows exponentially by the day. A number of exciting trials have been launched this year to test targeted agents in the adjuvant, postoperative setting, as well for therapy of patients with advanced stage disease. Exciting clinical trials have led to the approval of second- and third-generation agents targeting oncogene-driven tumors. A major initiative has been launched to target RAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in all cancer, and a major driver of outcomes in lung cancer.

Substantial progress has been achieved this year in targeted therapy, stereotactic radiation, and immunotherapy of lung cancer. Collaborative work demonstrated that patients with metastatic lung cancer who were treated successfully by targeting their oncogenic drivers do better than individuals who were treated with standard approaches across several centers of excellence, and that work needs to be successfully translated in the community for all patients with lung cancer in the coming years. While emergence of resistance, triggered through enhanced survival signaling circuits, is inevitable in these highly complex tumors, our understanding of these escape circuits is accelerating rapidly. We are learning to combine improved imaging methods with superior technology to detect circulating tumor cells in order to identify and treat patients with disease earlier than ever before.

However, we have yet to show we can successfully intervene in lung carcinogenesis. In a large trial that we performed in the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group, we found that natural compounds are incapable of reversing the damage caused by ongoing tobacco smoke. We must ally smoking cessation and early detection, and enhance our understanding of the cause of disease in never-smokers. We need to develop potent but tolerable compounds that can reverse premalignant lesions in former smokers.

While the 2009 Tobacco Control Act has enhanced the FDA’s ability to regulate tobacco products in some key areas, such as marketing to minors, major obstacles regarding the regulation of cigars, water pipes, menthol, and particularly e-cigarettes have limited the FDA’s ability to more effectively regulate the menace of Big Tobacco. Indeed, the booming electronic cigarettes industry threatens to enable a whole new generation of smokers. Unless we act decisively to carefully regulate the use of e-cigarettes, the steady progress made in lung cancer research and therapy over the past few decades could be eroded. It is only when we effectively reduce smoking by enforcing the FDA’s control of all products and implementing tobacco control programs with real teeth while simultaneously unraveling and preventing the causes of lung cancer in never-smokers that we will truly start to make an impact, fulfilling Surgeon General Terry’s and, most importantly, our patients’ goals to make lung cancer a disease of prior generations, and a scourge no more.

About Dr. Khuri

Fadlo Khuri, MDFadlo R. Khuri, MD, deputy director of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Hematology & Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, is a leading researcher and physician in the treatment of lung and head and neck cancers. He is Editor-in-Chief of the American Cancer Society’s peer-reviewed journal, Cancer.

Dr. Khuri’s contributions have been recognized by a number of national awards, including the prestigious 2013 Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award, given to an outstanding cancer researcher by the American Association for Cancer Research.

An accomplished molecular oncologist and translational thought leader, Dr. Khuri has conducted seminal research on oncolytic viral therapy, developed molecular-targeted therapeutic approaches for lung and head and neck tumors combining signal transduction inhibitors with chemotherapy, and has led major chemoprevention efforts in lung and head and neck cancers. Dr. Khuri’s clinical interests include thoracic and head and neck oncology. His research interests include development of molecular, prognostic, therapeutic, and chemopreventive approaches to improve the standard of care for patients with tobacco related cancers. His laboratory is investigating the mechanism of action of signal transduction inhibitors in lung and aerodigestive track cancers.

Total Lung Clinic – Shaping the Future of Lung Cancer Care

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. The causes of lung cancer can vary drastically, but individuals who smoke are undeniably at higher risk for lung cancer than those who don’t.

The specific cellular changes that occur as a result of lung cancer vary and are unique to each patient. These complex and unique genetic mutations, in combination with the fact that lung cancer is more advanced than most other cancers by the time it’s diagnosed, make lung cancer more difficult to treat than other cancers.

Here at the Winship Cancer Institute, our comprehensive lung cancer treatment program is shaping the future of lung cancer care by studying the effects of individualized cancer treatments. Individualized care involves understanding the unique biology of the genes that are driving each patient’s lung cancer or tumor, which results in a lung cancer treatment plan tailored to each patient’s specific needs.  And because the treatment of lung cancer involves a multidisciplinary and collaborative care team, we have established programs such as our TOTAL Lung Clinic to make the journey through treatment and survivorship an easier one.

Lung Cancer Chat Sign UpOn November 27th, Dr. Suresh Ramalingam of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is hosting an online chat on the topic of lung cancer to answer your questions and provide his feedback and insights on this complex disease. You can sign up for the lung cancer chat here, or using the button the right, and in the meantime, check out Dr. Ramalingam’s video to learn more about the benefits of individualized care for lung cancer patients.

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“TOTAL” Care for Lung Cancer – One Team, One Place, One Goal

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory UniversityEspecially in their later stages, lung cancer and other pulmonary diseases can be very complex to treat. The treatment of lung cancer can involve pulmonary surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pulmonary medicine specialists, interventional pulmonologists, pathologists, researches, nurses and supportive care team members. Because the treatment of pulmonary diseases like lung cancer requires a multifaceted and comprehensive team approach, the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University has established the “TOTAL” Lung Clinic at Emory University Hospital Midtown.

The Winship Thoracic Oncology Treatment and Long Term Care Lung (TOTAL) Clinic at Emory University Hospital Midtown is designed to make it easier for patients with lung cancer and other pulmonary diseases to seek all of their treatment in one place, with one team who are working together to coordinate the care of each and every patient. Patients of the TOTAL Clinic are able to see up to four lung cancer specialists in one setting and one trip: thoracic surgeon; interventional pulmonologist; medical oncologist; and radiation oncologist. In addition, patients may consult with supportive services, including dietitians and social services, at the same visit and setting.

The TOTAL Clinic was started by the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University approximately a year ago to make the journey through lung cancer treatment and survival an easier one on our patients. Below, hear from two of the patients of the Thoracic Oncology Treatment and Long Term Care Lung Clinic  what comprehensive treatment and care means to them:

The team/clinic approach has worked well for me and continues to do so. Initially, I was referred to cardiac/thoracic department by neurology. It was here that I became acquainted with Dr. Berkowitz, Dr. Pickens, and Dr. Kono. I was diagnosed, given a plan of action, and started on this plan within days due to their cooperation and effort.

I applaud Emory for their approach to healing and their remarkable professionals.

-Elizabeth Ross

When I was diagnosed with lung cancer, there was no question as to where I would begin my treatment.Emory’s top-notch reputation has lived up to all my expectations.

Through the entire process I have felt the doctor’s, nurses, and staff genuinely care about my well-being. That is one less concern for me as I battle to defeat this disease.

-Belinda Conley

For more information on the TOTAL Clinic, the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, or lung cancer treatment programs available at Emory Healthcare, please use the “Related Resources” links below.

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