Posts Tagged ‘lung cancer awareness’

Lung Cancer Screening – How It Can Save Your Life

Early lung cancer screening detects cancer & helps catch a tumor before it spreads. Medicare & private insurance companies cover screening for lung cancer.Did you know that lung cancer screening can save your life or that of your loved one? Better screening and minimally invasive surgery are changing the prognosis for patients with early-stage lung cancer.

We breathe in and out, every minute of every day. Our lungs are critical for life. Yet if a group of cells in someone’s lungs starts growing into a tumor, that person usually can’t see it or feel it. Until it becomes large enough to be dangerous.

The lungs are encased in the ribs, with few nerve endings. So a tumor has to grow quite large. Only then it starts to take away enough lung capacity to cause discomfort or make someone cough. Even below that threshold, as a tumor becomes larger, it is more likely for some cells to separate off and metastasize.

Early detection of lung cancer by CT (computed tomography) lung cancer screening offers an opportunity to catch a tumor before it grows and spreads. In 2011, the National Lung Screening Trial with over 50,000 participants established the life-saving value of lung cancer screening by lowdose CT for people with a history of heavy smoking. In the last two years, both Medicare and private insurance began to cover the screening for lung cancer procedure.

“Better lung cancer screening is changing the outcomes for lung cancer patients by allowing us to find these tumors earlier,” says Allan Pickens, a Winship thoracic surgeon and director of minimally invasive thoracic surgery and thoracic oncology at Emory University Hospital Midtown. “When we find these tumors earlier, they are generally of a smaller size and have not had the chance to spread to other parts of the body, lymph nodes or other organs.”

Because of increased numbers of lung cancer screenings, doctors now discover lung cancer when it’s small. Often, less than two centimeters wide. Clinical studies show this is a point when it may be possible to treat the cancer by surgery alone. Surgeons also have been shifting to minimally invasive approaches known as video-assisted thoracic surgery.

Lung cancer remains the number one cancer killer in the U.S. It takes the lives of more people than breast, prostate and colon cancers combined. Lung screening may help with the early diagnosis and increased survival rates for lung cancer patients. Emory Healthcare’s low-radiation-dose lung screening is available for patients with a significant smoking history.
Visit emoryhealthcare.org/lungct to learn more about screening qualifications.

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month – Reduce Your Cancer Risks Today

lung-cancerAccording to the American Cancer Society (ACS), lung cancer accounts for about 13% of all new cancers. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. For smokers, the risk of lung cancer is higher than non-smokers risks so I encourage smokers to make a plan to quit smoking during this lung cancer awareness month.

I would also recommend that you stay away from all tobacco products and byproducts, including second hand smoke. It’s never too late to stop smoking, contact Emory HealthConnection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse about finding a primary physician who can assist you in your health goals.

In addition to not smoking and avoiding second-hand smoke, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests you get your home tested for radon. Radon, a naturally occurring gas that comes from rocks and dirt, is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Radon can have a big impact on indoor air quality if you would like more information on test kits call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 or visit the website www.UGAradon.org.

About Dr. Sancheti

sanchetiLocated at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Dr. Sancheti specializes in thoracic oncology, minimally invasive thoracic surgery, esophageal surgery, and lung transplantation.

A board certified thoracic surgeon, Manu S. Sancheti, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery of the Department of Surgery at Emory University School of Medicine. He joined the Emory faculty in 2014. Dr. Sancheti holds memberships with the American College of Surgeons, the American Medical Association, the American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin, the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

Dr. Sancheti received his MD from the University of Alabama School of Medicine in 2006, after which he did a general surgery residency at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City from 2006-2011. He joined the faculty at Emory University after completing his cardiothoracic surgery residency on a general thoracic track there.

Recap on Live Lung Cancer Chat with Dr. Suresh Ramalingam

Dr. Suresh Ramalingam, Professor/Chief of Medical Oncology from the Winship Cancer Insititute, recently conducted an chat pertaining to the leading cause of cancer deaths among both men and women, which is lung cancer.

As many of us are already aware, Dr. Ramalingam reminded participants that secondhand smoke is a known risk factor for the development of lung cancer. Given that exposure to secondhand smoke varies and is difficult to track, it’s also hard to quantify the exact risk second hand smoke has on a person. However, recent studies have shown that states in which laws are in place to restrict public smoking are beginning to report declines in lung cancer incidence.

During the live chat, Dr. Ramalingam also touched on lung cancer treatment options and noted that there is no one-fits-all approach to treating a disease like lung cancer. Ideal treatment methods vary based on the stage of the disease. For early stage lung cancer, surgery is considered the standard treatment, however Dr. Ramalingam noted that some researchers believe stereotactic radiation will one day replace the need for surgery. Dr. Ramalingam added that radiation can also be a very effective treatment option for patients who are not candidates for surgery due to medical reasons. Chemotherapy has shown effectiveness in nearly all stages of lung cancer.

There’s great news for former smokers and the concern of developing lung cancer. Once a smoker quits, the risk of lung cancer progressively decreases. (For a timetable on the benefits of quitting, check out our blog post here) Recently, lung CT scans have demonstrated the ability to save lives in patients who currently smoke, or who have a history of smoking. Dr. Ramalingam suggests that former smokers discuss their smoking history with their physician to see if a lung CT screening is appropriate.

If you would like more information about the causes, prevention and methods used to treat lung cancer you may review Dr. Suresh Ramalingam’s lung cancer chat transcript here.

For more information on lung cancer, check out the related resources below. To become a patient, you may visit the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University online.

Related Resources

2 Ways to Lower Your Lung Cancer Risk Today

Lung Cancer Awareness Month
More people in the U.S. die from lung cancer than any other type of cancer. Lung cancer is responsible for approximately 30% of cancer deaths in the United States. In fact, it’s actually the cause of more deaths than breast cancer, colon cancer and prostate cancer combined. November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month and we’d like to share with you some important information and tips for how you can lower your lung cancer risk.

Quit Smoking

Obviously, if you smoke, the most important step you can take to lower your risk for lung cancer is to quit smoking. Quitting smoking:

  • Lowers your blood pressure and your heart rate – Within 20 minutes of quitting, your blood pressure and heart rate are reduced to almost normal.
  • Repairs damaged nerve endings – Within 48 hours of quitting, damaged nerve endings begin to repair themselves, and sense of taste and smell begin to return to normal as a result.
  • Lowers your risk for heart attack – Within 2-12 weeks of quitting, your heart attack risk is lowered.
  • Lowers your risk for lung cancer – According to a 2005 study by the National Institute of Health, within 10 years of quitting smoking, your risk of being diagnosed with lung cancer is between 30-50% of that for the smoker who didn’t quit.

Smoking accounts for ~90% of lung cancer cases. If you smoke, this is the critical first step in lowering your lung cancer risk. If you have a history of smoking and are between the ages of 55-75, you may be a candidate for a Lung CT Scan.

Eat a Wider Variety and More Fruits & Veggies

In November 2007,  the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund published Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective, the most comprehensive report on diet and cancer ever completed. The study found evidence linking diets high in fruit and their ability to lower lung cancer risk to be probable. This is one of the core reasons that the AICR recommends consuming at least five portions a day of fruits and vegetables. After evaluating approximately 500,000 people in 10 countries in Europe, another study demonstrated intaking a variety of produce may also help lower lung cancer risk, so make sure to vary the color on your plate!

Chat Online with Dr. Suresh Ramalingam

Lung Cancer Web ChatIf you have specific questions about lung cancer, whether they’re related to prevention, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, support, or otherwise, Dr. Ramalingam is hosting a free 1-hour online web chat about Lung Cancer on Thursday, November 17th. Dr. Ramalingam will also be fielding questions on the topic of Lung CT scanning, a lung cancer screening mechanism that studies have shown may help lower the risk of lung cancer mortality.

You can ask as many questions as you’d like in the chat, or feel free to sign up to check out Dr. Ramalingam’s answers to other participant questions. We hope to see you there! UPDATE: Lung Cancer Chat Transcript