Posts Tagged ‘healthy eating’

Enjoy Holiday Food Without Regret

Eating Thanksgiving with CancerEating healthy during the holidays can be a challenge for most of us, but for many cancer patients it’s a struggle just to eat. If you’re currently going through cancer treatment, eating might not be the first thing on your mind. However, staying nourished during treatment is extremely important. Your body needs more nutrients than normal to repair the effects of treatment.

We are all well aware that holiday foods tend to be fatty and sugary with many strong flavors. If you are having symptoms such as nausea, low appetite, taste changes, or pain with swallowing, many of the traditional holiday foods will be unsettling. Avoid heavy cream sauces or gravies if you have a sensitive stomach. Also, stay out of the room where food is being cooked because cooking smells can make you nauseous. Turkey breast, cranberry sauce, potatoes, and basic vegetable dishes should be well tolerated. Whole grains, like brown rice, barley and quinoa, make excellent side dishes. Eat lots of fruits or veggies without buttery sauces or other fats. Let friends and family know how you feel and what dishes you can tolerate. Eat small portions and see how you handle the food, then go back for larger portions. Don’t overdo it.

If you are in cancer treatment, you may have a weakened immune system and you will need to be extra careful about foodborne illness and food safety. The primary cause of foodborne illness is eating perishable foods that have been held longer than two hours at room temperature. Keep hot foods at 140° F or higher and cold foods at 40° F or lower, out of the “danger zone.” Discard any turkey, stuffing, gravy or other items left out longer than two hours. Do not wait to refrigerate leftover foods; place immediately in a shallow container and pop them in the fridge. Keep turkey and dressing no longer than three days in the refrigerator, or freeze them. If you have any doubt about whether raw vegetables have been washed, skip them or bring your own.

During this season of parties and social gatherings, many struggle to balance holiday indulgences with a healthy lifestyle. Weeks of eating foods high in sugar and fat, and limited amounts of fruits and vegetables, can start the New Year off with unwanted extra pounds. For rich, seasonal treats, focus on small portions: a bite-size piece of chocolate, a small handful of party nuts, slivers of pumpkin pie. Studies show that the first few bites of a food taste the best.

Limit high-calorie, sugary beverages and get creative with plain water by making your own infused water. My favorite combination is mint with cucumber slices, refrigerated for at least 4 hours. But you can mix any fruit and herb variety. Include some of these healthy foods into your holiday diet: green and orange fruits and vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, berries, wild legumes, almonds and Brazil nuts, and ginger.

The holidays are a special time, but for those in cancer treatment, there’s also anxiety. With careful planning and preparation, you can create an enjoyable holiday season.

About Tiffany Barrett

Tifffany BarrettTiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, provides personalized nutritional advice to Winship at Emory patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. She also consults with patients who have completed treatment and wish to continue to build a strong and healthy diet. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Florida State University and a Master of Science at University of North Florida. She is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management.

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Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle

Eat Healthy with CancerThe Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recognizes March as National Nutrition Month. This year’s theme, “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle,” encourages everyone, including individuals undergoing cancer treatment, to adopt plans focused on making informed eating choices and getting daily exercise to improve overall health.

A healthy eating plan limits foods with added fats, sugars, and salt and emphasizes nutrient-rich foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, nuts and seeds. Nutritional needs should be met primarily through consuming food, not supplements, because whole foods provide a variety of other components that are considered beneficial to health. A healthy lifestyle is also more than just choosing to eat more fruits and vegetables. Age, gender, family history, and current health condition play a role in determining which foods we should eat more of and foods to avoid.

Understanding the nutritional content of foods is essential to making informed choices when building an eating plan. For example, dairy is not the only food group that contains calcium. Collard greens are also a good choice. Reading the Nutrition Facts Panel and the ingredient lists can be confusing, but it is a good way to determine nutritional content of food products.

Daily physical activity should go along with eating a healthy diet. Recommendations include at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity. Strength training exercises, such as lifting light weights and doing push ups, are also beneficial.

Here are some additional tips to help you “bite into a healthy lifestyle”:

  • Try one new food every week, instead of a complete diet overhaul.
  • Cook a new recipe or adapt an old one each week.
  • Fill half your plate with a variety of fruits and vegetables at every meal.
  • Try whole wheat, quinoa, brown rice, oats, barley.
  • Consume healthy lean protein sources.
  • Limit foods with added fats, sugars and salt.
  • Limit sweetened beverages.
  • Reduce foods that increase health risks.
  • Stay within your calorie needs when increasing healthier foods.
  • Eat a healthy balance between proteins, fruits, vegetables, fats and grains.

A registered dietitian can work with your preferences and routine to provide sound, easy-to-follow personalized nutrition advice to meet a lifestyle based eating plan.

Attend a cooking demonstration

Attend a cooking demonstration hosted by registered dietitian, Tiffany Barrett, on March 18th from 12:30pm until 1:30pm in the John H. Kauffman Auditorium at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University (1365-C Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322).

About Tiffany Barrett

Tifffany BarrettTiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and sought after expert in her field. She is a key contributor to support programs at Winship and provides personalized nutritional advice to Winship Cancer Institute patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. She also consults with patients who have completed treatment and wish to continue to build a strong and healthy diet. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Florida State University and a Master of Science at University of North Florida. Tiffany is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management.

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Healthy Holiday Eating Web Chat

‘Tis the season for indulgence, fa la la la la la la la laaaaa! With the holiday season upon us, it’s hard to resist the urge to overindulge. While it is important for everyone to know how to make healthy choices when it comes to nutrition and exercise, incorporating the right foods a nutritional elements into one’s diet is especially important for cancer survivors. According to the National Cancer Institute, an individual is considered a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis through the balance of his or her life. Understanding the role nutrition plays before, during, and after cancer treatment is critical to ensuring cancer survivors are as strong as possible through their journey in the fight against cancer.

Because nutritional recommendations can be very different for cancer patients than for the average healthy adult, Tiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, is hosting an online chat on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at noon EST to share her insights on optimal nutrition to support the journey in the fight against cancer.

Be proactive this holiday season and join Tiffany and our other chat participants to share tips, ideas, and get questions answered related to the best nutritional choices you can make this holiday season and beyond!

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