Posts Tagged ‘event’

Breast Cancer Awareness Month Events in Atlanta

Breast Cancer Awareness MonthThe American Cancer Society estimates that a total of 229,060 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in both men and women in 2012. In honor of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Emory Healthcare and the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have partnered with organizations across Atlanta to host events and help raise awareness around breast cancer throughout the month. A detailed listing of events is below:

Be the Boss of You Breast Cancer Trail Ride 
Description: Breast Cancer Research Fundraiser
Date: Saturday, October 6, 2012
Details: Registration opens at 8 AM; Ride begins at 10 AM

Winship Win the Fight 5K
Description: 5K Walk/Run and Tot Trot
Date: Saturday, October 13, 2012
Details: Warm-up- 8:10 AM, Race begins- 8:30 AM, Tot Trot- 9:30 AM
Registration: General online registration www.winship5k.kintera.org. Make sure to join the Emory Breast Center’s team, “The Hooter Helpers.”

Breast Cancer Web Chat
Description: Join Heather Pinkerton, RN, BSN, OCN and Nurse Navigator for the Emory Breast Centers, as she hosts a live web chat on Breast Cancer.
Date: Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Details: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Registration: To register, please visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

Winship at the Y
Description: Join members of the Winship Cancer Institute Breast Team along with representatives from the American Cancer  Society and Metro Atlanta YMCA to discuss the latest in screening, diagnosis, treatment and  prevention of Breast Cancer.
Date: Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Details: 9-11 a.m., Summit Family YMCA, Newnan, GA;  1 – 3 p.m., Carl Saunders Family YMCA, Atlanta, GA; 5-7 p.m., Ed Isakson Family YMCA, Alpharetta, GA.
Registration: Not required

National Breast Reconstruction Awareness Day
Description: Research shows that 7 out of 10 women are not aware of their breast reconstruction options following mastectomy. Do you know your options? Ask your health care provider about reconstruction today!
Date: Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Details: 9-11 a.m., Summit Family YMCA, Newnan, GA;  1 – 3 p.m., Carl Saunders Family YMCA, Atlanta, GA; 5-7 p.m., Ed Isakson Family YMCA, Alpharetta, GA.
Registration: Not required

National Mammography Day
Description: The third Friday in October each year is National Mam-mography Day, first proclaimed by President Clinton in 1993. On this day, and throughout the month, women are encouraged to make a mammography appointment. In celebration light refreshment tables will be set up at both the Clifton and Midtown Breast Imaging Center Lobbies.
Date: Friday, October 19.2012
Registration: To schedule an appointment, call (404) 778-PINK (7465).

Ready, Set, Pink!
Description: Join Bloomingdales and representatives from Winship Cancer Institute for a fall fashion presentation and complimentary skincare consultations by Lancôme. 10% of all purchases go to Winship and the fight against breast cancer.
Date: Tuesday, October 23, 2012
Details: 11:00 a.m. at Bloomingdales at Lenox Square, Level 2, The New View
Registration: RSVP by October 18 by calling 404-778-1769 or emailing winshipevents@emory.edu

Clinical Breast Exams (for Emory Employees only)
Description:  Free Clinical Breast Exams for Emory Employees.
Date: Tuesday, October 23, 2012
Location: 2nd Floor East Clinic
Start Time: 4:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Registration: To register for the event, call (404) 778-PINK (7465)

Extended & Weekend Hours
Description:  The Emory Breast Center is offering extended and weekend hours for women needing a screening mammogram.
Dates & Details: - Extended Hours: Tuesday, October 23 – Thursday, October 25; 7:30 AM to 7:00 PM at the Emory Breast Center on Clifton Campus.
Saturday Hours: October 27; 8:00 AM- 3:00 PM at Emory University Hospital Midtown
Registration: To schedule an appointment, call (404) 778-PINK (7465). Standard rates apply.

The Role of Support Groups in Cancer Survivorship

Cancer Survivorship Peer Partners Web ChatAs an Oncology Social Worker at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, I provide resources and support to patients and their families throughout the cancer journey. During my first visit with a new patient, I often suggest that he or she try out one of the many support groups offered at Winship or in the community. The response I get from this suggestion varies depending on the patient from enthusiasm to absolute fear.  As a facilitator of two support groups at Winship, I am admittedly a strong advocate of joining a group. However, I understand the apprehension some feel towards sharing the ups and downs of the cancer journey with other people.

For those uncomfortable with participating in support groups, I often outline the benefits of using support groups as a method to cope and connect to others in similar situations. Research from The American Cancer Society provides the following about support groups:

  • Support groups can enhance the quality of life for people with cancer by providing information and support to overcome feelings of aloneness and helplessness.
  • Support groups can help reduce tension, anxiety, fatigue and confusion.
  • There is a strong link between group support and greater tolerance of cancer treatment and treatment compliance.
  • People with cancer are better able to deal with their disease when supported by others.

Dr. Sujatha Murali, Assistant Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Winship, endorses the use of support groups. Dr. Murali states, “support groups are an integral part of treating the whole patient. At Emory, we believe in a multidisciplinary approach to cancer care, which not only includes physicians and nurses, but social workers, pharmacists, and nutritionists. We believe this approach results in the best chance of treatment success.”

Still not convinced joining a support group is right for you? Fortunately, support groups come in different forms and sizes. For those uncomfortable with face-to-face group settings, online or telephone groups are great alternatives. Some groups are lead by professional clinicians while others are organized by cancer survivors themselves. Groups can be disease, age or gender specific and some meet weekly, monthly or have no time limit at all.  With all these options available, there’s bound to be a support group to fit anyone’s needs! And if you’re still not sure where to turn, you can always contact me or other social workers at Winship with your questions or by using the comments field below. You can also join Joan Giblin, Director of the Survivorship Program at the Winship Cancer Institute in our upcoming online chat on the Cancer Survivorship and Peer Partners Program at Winship.

Interested in joining a support group, but do not know how to select the right one? The first step is to speak with your oncology social worker!  If you aren’t sure who your social worker is, simply ask your doctor or nurse to point him or her out. Most cancer centers have oncology social workers dedicated to support your psychosocial needs and overall well-being.  Some recommended and approved groups are available through the following sites:

To close, I’d like to share a quote I often share with my patients. It’s out of Mr. Fred Rogers’s book, Life’s Journeys According to Mister Rogers: Things to Remember Along the Way. He writes, “Anything that’s human is mentionable, and anything that is mentionable can be more manageable. When we can talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting, and less scary. The people we trust with that important talk can help us know that we’re not alone.”

The cancer journey can be overwhelming, especially if traveled alone. The benefit of allowing others to provide support and care can be life-changing, and possibly life-saving. Join us as we kick-off some of our new support groups, including the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Support Group on Thursday, June 14, 2012. For more information, please see visit our website at http://winshipcancer.emory.edu/groups.

About the Author
Margaret “Maggie” K. Hughes is a Licensed Master of Social Worker at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. She works with Drs. Hawk, Murali, Kucuk, Carthon and El-Rayes. Maggie facilitates the Pancreatic Cancer Support group and co-facilitates the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Support Group at Winship.

Related Resources:

Join Us for the 32nd Annual Charles Harris Run for Leukemia

Charles Harris Run for LeukemiaThe annual Charles Harris Run for Leukemia, which benefits leukemia research at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, is scheduled for Saturday, February 25. The 10K run kicks off at 7:45 am at Tucker High School; the one-mile run/walk starts at Druid Hills Middle School.

The run honors the late Dr. Charles E. Harris — former teacher, coach and beloved principal of Shamrock High School. Dr. Harris passed away more than three decades ago from leukemia at the age of 49. Dr. Harris was an un-sung All-American football player at the University of Georgia and a Marine who volunteered for the Korean War. Playing on the Camp Pendleton football team, Pete Rozelle, father of the modern day NFL, attempted to draft Dr. Harris to the Los Angeles Rams football team before he graduated from UGA. He played one year with the New York Titans (now Jets) and made it to the last cut with the Cleveland Browns during the Jim Brown and Coach Paul Brown era. An avid runner, Dr. Harris ran in the inaugural Peachtree Road Race. He left behind a wife and three children.

Dr. Harris’ children, led by son Chuck Harris, began the Charles Harris Run for Leukemia 32 years ago this year, and they have dedicated all race proceeds to Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. In celebration of this special 32nd anniversary, please consider joining us this year as a walker, runner or race day volunteer.

If you would like register for the race please follow the registration link at www.charlesharrisrun.com.

Volunteers are also needed during the race to hand out t-shirts, pass out water at various water stations, cover intersecting points, help out in the finish shoot and help with bag check. Please go to http://charlesharrisrun.com/contactus.html to register to volunteer. All volunteers should report to Shamrock Middle School between 6:15 and 6:30 am. Volunteers will receive a free t-shirt, philanthropic points and the opportunity to watch world class runners compete!

Directions to Shamrock Middle School from Emory University:

  1. Head Southeast on OXFORD RD NE toward N. Decatur Rd.
  2. Stay on N. DECATUR RD for 2.1 miles
  3. Turn left on SCOTT BLVD (also called US29, US-78 E, and GA-8) Follow US-29 for 2.1 miles.
  4. Turn left on HARCOURT DR.
  5. HARCOURT dead ends on MT. OLIVE DR. – turn right
  6. SHAMROCK MIDDLE SCHOOL is on the left.

If you have questions about volunteer opportunities, please contact Melissa Harris at (770) 495-8557 or email Melissa_h@bellsouth.net.

Dr. Styblo Follows Up with Answers to Breast Cancer Questions

We held a chat on the topic of breast cancer with Dr. Toncred Styblo in October. From that chat, we got lots of great questions and feedback and even a couple questions we couldn’t get to in the chat’s allotted time. Dr. Styblo has taken the time to answer those questions for this follow up blog post, mostly covering questions related to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a type of breast cancer typically found in the lining of the milk ducts that has not yet invaded nearby tissues.

Below are the questions Dr. Styblo has covered in this post:

  • How long does one continue to follow up with oncologist and surgeon after DCIS diagnosis and resultant mastectomy?
  • What is the risk of recurrence in other breast after DCIS and mastectomy?
  • Does that include blood work for Ca27-29, and how often?
  • I’m interested in risk of recurrence after DCIS diagnosis. If you continue to follow your patients for life (which Dr. Styblo mentioned in the chat that she does), that suggests a moderate risk for recurrence.]
  • What would you suggest in the case of multifocal DCIS?

Answers from Dr. Styblo:

Toncred Marya Styblo, M.D.DCIS, intraductal cancer and in situ ductal cancer are names for stage “0″ breast cancer. Stage 0 breast cancer is cured by removing it completely with surgery, but does not have any affect on the risk of developing a second breast cancer in that breast or the other breast.

The surgery to remove the cancer may be a lumpectomy or it might be a mastectomy.  This risk of a patient developing another breast cancer post-surgery is dependent on many factors and the risk is best assessed by your doctor.  The subsequent follow up and recommendations about screening and risk reduction will be dependent on additional factors including the pathologic features of the DCIS and the patient’s risk of developing a second breast cancer.

Because DCIS is stage 0 breast cancer, follow up is primarily to screen for another breast cancer rather than recurrence.  The screening includes breast imaging and clinical exam, there are no blood tests indicated.


Dr. Styblo also received a question on the topic of support in the chat: What role, in your opinion does emotional support play in achieving the best possible outcome after breast cancer? Where or how do you recommend patients find advocates? The Winship Cancer Institute has several programs for survivors and support, including the Peer Partner Program which “matches cancer survivors and caregivers with cancer patients and caregivers dealing with a similar diagnosis of cancer, pre-cancerous condition, or benign tumor.”

Breast Health & Breast Cancer Related Resources:

 

 

2 Ways to Lower Your Lung Cancer Risk Today

Lung Cancer Awareness Month
More people in the U.S. die from lung cancer than any other type of cancer. Lung cancer is responsible for approximately 30% of cancer deaths in the United States. In fact, it’s actually the cause of more deaths than breast cancer, colon cancer and prostate cancer combined. November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month and we’d like to share with you some important information and tips for how you can lower your lung cancer risk.

Quit Smoking

Obviously, if you smoke, the most important step you can take to lower your risk for lung cancer is to quit smoking. Quitting smoking:

  • Lowers your blood pressure and your heart rate – Within 20 minutes of quitting, your blood pressure and heart rate are reduced to almost normal.
  • Repairs damaged nerve endings – Within 48 hours of quitting, damaged nerve endings begin to repair themselves, and sense of taste and smell begin to return to normal as a result.
  • Lowers your risk for heart attack – Within 2-12 weeks of quitting, your heart attack risk is lowered.
  • Lowers your risk for lung cancer – According to a 2005 study by the National Institute of Health, within 10 years of quitting smoking, your risk of being diagnosed with lung cancer is between 30-50% of that for the smoker who didn’t quit.

Smoking accounts for ~90% of lung cancer cases. If you smoke, this is the critical first step in lowering your lung cancer risk. If you have a history of smoking and are between the ages of 55-75, you may be a candidate for a Lung CT Scan.

Eat a Wider Variety and More Fruits & Veggies

In November 2007,  the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund published Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective, the most comprehensive report on diet and cancer ever completed. The study found evidence linking diets high in fruit and their ability to lower lung cancer risk to be probable. This is one of the core reasons that the AICR recommends consuming at least five portions a day of fruits and vegetables. After evaluating approximately 500,000 people in 10 countries in Europe, another study demonstrated intaking a variety of produce may also help lower lung cancer risk, so make sure to vary the color on your plate!

Chat Online with Dr. Suresh Ramalingam

Lung Cancer Web ChatIf you have specific questions about lung cancer, whether they’re related to prevention, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, support, or otherwise, Dr. Ramalingam is hosting a free 1-hour online web chat about Lung Cancer on Thursday, November 17th. Dr. Ramalingam will also be fielding questions on the topic of Lung CT scanning, a lung cancer screening mechanism that studies have shown may help lower the risk of lung cancer mortality.

You can ask as many questions as you’d like in the chat, or feel free to sign up to check out Dr. Ramalingam’s answers to other participant questions. We hope to see you there! UPDATE: Lung Cancer Chat Transcript