Posts Tagged ‘colorectal cancer prevention’

4 Ways Men Can Lower Their Risk of Cancer

Man talking with doctor

One out of every three men in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives. This is a sobering statistic to consider. Beyond skin cancer, men are most frequently diagnosed with prostate, lung or colorectal cancer, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Those are also the three malignancies responsible for the highest number of deaths in men.

For men, reducing the risk of cancer is more important than ever.

Here Are Four Ways to Make an Impact Today

  1. If you use any tobacco products, quit now. Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than a dozen types of cancer including those involving our lungs, bladder, and mouth. Chewing tobacco and snuff can also cause head and neck, esophageal, stomach or pancreatic cancer. Talk with your doctor about the best ways to help you kick the habit for good. Finding a support group can also make a big difference in whether you succeed.
  2. Cut back on alcohol consumption. Heavy drinking can cause health problems, but did you also know that alcohol can increase your risk for cancers of the mouth, throat, liver and colon? The risk increases for those who drink and smoke at the same time. It is recommended that men consume no more than two alcoholic drinks per day. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, moderate alcohol consumption is defined as having up to 2 drinks per day for men. Remember, one drink is equal to 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor.
  3. Get a checkup. The best place to start with screenings is with your annual physical exam; here you can find a doctor near you. Starting at age 50, men at average risk for colorectal cancer should have a colonoscopy. If no polyps are found, the test should be repeated every 10 years. If you are considered to be in a high-risk group, your doctor may recommend that you be tested earlier.
  4. Get some exercise. Regular physical activity is one of the best ways to control your weight, reduce stress and lower your risk of cancer. Try to get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise each week or 75 minutes of vigorous workouts. That’s how much exercise the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends for a healthy lifestyle.

Don’t waste any time, make sure you or your loved one puts down that cigarette and/or beer, gets outside and grabs a tennis racket, soccer ball or even Frisbee for some physical activity. Also, don’t forget to wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30.

About Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Comprehensive Cancer Center for Georgia — the highest designation given by the NCI to cancer centers in the nation. Winship offers expertise in cancer research, prevention, detection and treatment with the most advanced therapies. Winship is where you get treatments years before others can. Our expert team coordinates every detail of your visit to meet your individualized treatment plan. Visit emoryhealthcare.org/cancer or call 1-888-WINSHIP for an appointment.

Emory Healthcare

At Emory Healthcare, we’re here to help you find the care you need when you need it. With more than 2,800 doctors and 300 locations, including 11 hospitals, as well as primary care offices, urgent cares and MinuteClinics, we’re delivering specialized care across the region. Find a doctor near you to help you get and stay healthy.

Emory HealthConnection is where registered nurses can help you find a location or specialist that’s right for you. Call 404-778-7777 from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST (M-F).

 

Takeaways from the Colorectal Cancer Live Chat at Winship

colorectal-chat-emailThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, March 8th for the live online colorectal cancer program chat at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University hosted by Drs. Bassel El-Rayes & Seth Rosen.

Drs. El-Rayes & Rosen answered several of your questions about colorectal cancer risk factors, symptoms and therapy. The colorectal cancer program at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University offers multidisciplinary teams including oncology surgeons, radiologists, medical oncologists, pathologists, and advanced practice nurses with expertise in colorectal cancer and other gastrointestinal cancers. There are a variety of treatment options for colorectal cancer; for some patients, a combination of treatment methods may be used.

Check out the conversation by viewing the chat transcript! Here are just a few questions from the chat:

Question: How prevalent is family history? Should I have a plan to have [colorectal cancer] testing done?

  • Answer from Dr. Rosen: Approximately 15% of colorectal cancer patients have a family history of the cancer.
  • Answer from Dr. El-Rayes: Family history is an important predictor of the risk of developing colon cancer. Patients with family history of multiple relatives with colorectal or other cancers should seek evaluation to determine if their family history puts them at added risk for developing cancer. At Winship we have a multidisciplinary team that includes geneticists, genetic counselors, colorectal surgeons, gastroenterologists, and medical oncologists who can work with families who have inherited pre-dispositions for colon cancer.

Question: If you have been diagnosed/hospitalized (8 years ago) with divraticulos how often should you have a colonoscopy? And is it related to bleeding that starts and stops when you are stressed and your bowels lock up? And is it hereditary?

  • Answer from Dr. Rosen: Diverticular disease does not have any bearing on risk of colorectal cancer, so it does not change surveillance or screening recommendations. It can cause bleeding, and there is possibly a hereditary component.
  • Answer from Dr. El-Rayes: The frequency of colonoscopy is dependent on family history, presence of chronic inflammatory conditions (like Ulcerative colitis) and presence of polyps. Diverticulosis of in of itself does not impact the risk of developing colon cancer.

Question: If a person with family history of Colon Cancer can’t afford the test who can help them?

  • Answer from Dr. Rosen: The Affordable Care Act offers free screening for colorectal cancer.

 

If you missed this chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. For more information go to the Colorectal Cancer at Winship Cancer Institute website or 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse.

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If you have additional questions for Drs. El-Rayes & Rosen, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

Colorectal Cancer Live Chat: Risk Factors, Screenings, Symptoms & Therapy – March 8, 2016

colorectal-chat-emailMost colorectal cancers start as a growth, called a polyp, in the inner lining of the colon or rectum and slowly progresses through the other layers.  According to American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States and 134,490 new cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2016 nationally.

The colorectal cancer program at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University offers multidisciplinary teams including oncology surgeons, radiologists, medical oncologists, pathologists, and advanced practice nurses with expertise in colorectal cancer and other gastrointestinal cancers.  There are a variety of treatment options for colorectal cancer; for some patients, a combination of treatment methods may be used.

Join Drs. Bassel El-Rayes & Seth Rosen, two physicians with Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s colorectal cancer team, on Tuesday, March 8th at 12pm EST for a live chat where they will answer your questions about colorectal cancer risk factors, screenings, symptoms and therapy. All are welcome to attend an online open-forum discussion about colorectal cancer. Sign up for this live chat here.

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“Top Secret” Cancer Facts Worth Sharing

cancer secretsIt’s time to stop being embarrassed about the 3rd most commonly diagnosed cancer and the 3rd leading cause of cancer death for both men and women. More than 140,000 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year and nearly 50,000 will lose their battle to the disease according to The American Cancer Society.

It’s colon cancer awareness month – share the facts about how a colorectal cancer screening could save your life.

A study, published in JAMA Surgery and recently reported in the NYT, showed that incidences of colorectal cancer have been decreasing by about 1 percent a year since the mid 1980s. Simply said, more people under the recommended screening age of 50 are being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

Colon cancer is not embarrassing. There’s simply no sense in keeping secrets from your physician. If you have a history of colorectal cancer in your family or have particular symptoms that you’re unsure about then it’s time to get the facts from your doctor. Speak openly about your risk factors, prevention, early detection, and treatment.
Prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer are possible by appropriately scheduling a colorectal cancer screening. A conversation with your doctor is always confidential; make it honest and candid.

As a Nurse Practitioner in gastrointestinal cancers, I have had many patients who have stated that they wish they had gotten a colonoscopy as recommended for colorectal cancer screening. They also say they now preach to everyone they know to get their colonoscopies.

Find a primary physician through our Emory Healthcare Network or call Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse. No topic is top secret or off limits.

About Ms. Brutcher
Edith Brutcher

A chemotherapy infusion specialist and adult nurse practitioner, Ms. Brutcher’s clinical specialties include gastrointestinal and aerodigestive cancers. She has 27 years experience as a Registered Nurse, and 8 years as an Adult Nurse Practitioner with Medical Oncology. She obtained her Master of Science in Nursing Adult Practitioner, specializing in oncology and immunology, at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Related Resources

Colon Cancer Chat Transcript
An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part I: Risk Factors, Symptoms & Diagnosis
An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part II: Prevention, Diagnosis & Treatment
Winship Cancer Institute – Colon Cancer Resources