Posts Tagged ‘clinical trials at winship cancer institute’

Winship Cancer Institute Celebrates 2015 as a Banner Year

Ranked first in Georgia for cancer care, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University offers patients with access to progressive resources, technology and cancer treatment options through Georgia’s largest health care system Emory Healthcare. As Georgia’s first and only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, Winship is a national leader in seeking out new ways to defeat cancer and in translating that knowledge into patient care.

Key 2015 Highlights:

  • For the second year in a row, Winship was ranked as a top 25 cancer program nationwide, moving up from 24th to 22nd nationally, and as best in Georgia by U.S. News & World Report.
  • Winship expanded staff and services this year at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory John’s Creek Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown.
  • Winship’s clinical trials program enrolled more patients on trials than in any other year and contributed to the approval of four new therapies for multiple myeloma.
  • Winship exceeded its fundraising goal for the Win the Fight 5K in September, bringing in more than $778,000 for cancer research.

Read the full transcript of the video here.

A New Method to Find the Site of Returning Prostate Cancer

prostate cancer diagram

The yellow arrow and the white arrows on the pictures above indicate areas of prostate cancer that were invisible to previously available imaging techniques. Instead, they were detected using a new positron-emission tomography (PET) test called FACBC, which was developed and is being tested at Emory University.

A voluntary research study is being conducted to help men with recurring prostate cancer by using advanced imaging technology called FACBC to guide radiotherapy and determine the best possible course of treatment. This study would be added as an extra layer in your ongoing cancer treatment.*

We are looking for patients to participate in this clinical trial.

“By participating in this study, patients may have the opportunity to have an FACBC scan. The precision of this type of scan could help guide more effective treatment for patients whose cancer has returned,” says Ashesh Jani, MD, radiation oncologist and principal investigator.

Have you previously had surgery to treat prostate cancer, but think the cancer has returned? Has your doctor recommended radiation therapy as the next step in your care?

Participants must meet specific eligibility criteria:
• You are over 18 years of age.
• You had surgery (prostatectomy) to treat your prostate cancer.
• Your doctor suspects that the cancer has returned (as indicated by a rising PSA).
• Radiation therapy is now being considered as the next step in your care.

The trial is open at these locations: Winship Cancer Institute on the Clifton Road campus, Winship at Emory University Hospital Midtown, Winship at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital and Georgia Cancer Center for Excellence at Grady.

*You will be followed for a minimum of three years, with PSA levels checked every six months, in addition to having study-related lab work. There is no cost for the FACBC scan or the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) required lab work. All other imaging, lab work, biopsies (if any), radiation therapy and any other therapy will be billed to your insurance provider or paid out of pocket by you. You may be eligible for a travel voucher if you are chosen to undergo the FACBC scan.

For more information or to enroll, contact Ashesh Jani, MD, at (404) 778-3827 or abjani@emory.edu.

Learn more about Winship’s approach to Prostate Cancer Treatment
Read Winship’s Brochure on FACBC

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Massage Therapy Used to Combat Breast Cancer-Related Fatigue

cancer and massage therapyFatigue is the most common side effect of cancer treatment according to the National Cancer Institute. Many breast cancer survivors describe their fatigue as more intense than the feelings of being tired that we all experience from time to time. Reported characteristics include feeling tired, weak, worn-out, heavy, slow, or lack of energy and difficulty getting-up-and-going.

Currently, researchers from Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University are investigating the benefits of massage therapy on breast cancer survivors with extreme fatigue.

“We decided to look at massage therapy for cancer fatigue because cancer-related fatigue is one of the most prevalent and debilitating symptoms experienced by people with cancer,” explains Mark Rapaport, MD, principle investigator for this study. “Many studies investigating massage for patients with cancer have been focused on depression, anxiety or pain.”

“We already know that frequent massage can enhance the immune system and reduce anxiety, and it has been reported that massage therapy can stimulate energy, and reduce symptoms such as nausea and pain,” says Mylin Torres, MD, associate professor in Emory’s Department of Radiation Oncology, serves as a co-investigator on the study. “We believe that there are many positive effects to be gained by therapeutic massage and we hope to prove that, among other biological advantages, massage may diminish the incapacitation that cancer-related fatigue can cause for our patients.”

Participants in the six-week study are post-surgery breast cancer patients, between the ages of 18 and 65, who have been treated with standard chemotherapy, chemoprevention and/or radiation, and are suffering with breast cancer-related fatigue. They are broken into three groups.

  • Group one receives a typical Swedish-type massage
  • Group two does not receive a massage
  • Group three receives a light touch massage.

Throughout the clinical trial, participants’ vital signs are taken and blood drawn to check for immune markers. The study staff also regularly checks in with each participant to record any changes in their life or their health. So far, the findings are promising.

View this Fox21 news clip to learn more about recent findings from the cancer fatigue trial!

 

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