Posts Tagged ‘cancer research’

Scientists of the Next Generation

As children we have all been to the doctor, visited the dentist, perhaps even sat in the cockpit of a plane. Anyone ever sit in front of a cryo-electron microscope, play with the dials on a mass spectrometer, or manipulate the genetic code? Most of us probably did not have that opportunity. I surely did not. So how will children, that is, our next generation of scientists, even consider being a scientist without ever knowing what a scientist does?

I am a cancer biologist with a lab focused on cancer metastasis (spread of the cancer). We study how cancer metastasis occurs in subtypes of patients to develop new treatments designed for these particular patients. On the side, I have also traveled throughout Georgia visiting over 3,000 students in K-12th grade to teach them about science and scientists. I have had the fortunate experience of visiting over 40 schools ranging from urban to rural, and public to private. I can state with 100% certainty that children are extremely interested in real science. Whether it has been high school assemblies or elementary school STEM fairs, students (adults too) are excited, enthusiastic, and most of all curious. They are curious not just about science itself, but what a scientist is and what a scientist does.

This signals to me that we need to make science more accessible. City wide science fairs, STEM fairs in school, career days, Twitter chats (#scistuchat), and experiential science in the classroom are excellent approaches. But scientists too need to open up their labs to reach out as well. We, as a professional group, need to show that we are not a bunch of mad scientists in the lab running through billows of smoking Erlenmeyer flasks trying to cure cancer. Instead we are well-coordinated teams of researchers and clinicians, working in fields that include math, engineering, informatics, surgery, and genetics that share a common goal of helping humans.

So, to all scientists out there, I propose to just take out your phone and record a 1-minute, impromptu lab tour, and send it to social media (#labtour). This gives anyone access through the locked lab doors to see what we do and who we are. My lab’s really quick video is posted here and embedded below.

The next generation of scientists are sitting out there right now learning in our classrooms. Within their minds are new treatments for cancer, novel screening approaches for neurodegenerative diseases, ideas for space exploration, and new robotic technologies. It is up to teachers, scientists, families, and communities to engage these students, make science more accessible, and let them know what is out there. I believe that if they can know the names and abilities of every single super-hero, princess, and cartoon character by age 7, they can surely know the parts of a cell. Let’s challenge them and see what we get!

About Dr. Marcus


Adam Marcus, PhDAdam Marcus received his PhD in cell biology from Penn State University in 2002 and went on to do a post-doctoral fellowship in cancer pharmacology at Emory University. Dr. Marcus is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine and has developed his own laboratory which focuses on cell biology and pharmacology in lung and breast cancer. Dr. Marcus’ laboratory studies how cancer cells invade and metastasize using a combination of molecular and imaging-based approaches. For more information about Dr. Marcus and his outreach and research efforts, please use the related resources links below. You can also follow Dr. Marcus on Twitter @NotMadScientist.

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Fundamental Science Can Transform Cancer Care Worldwide

World Cancer Day is February 4, and it is an important reminder that cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. According to the World Health Organization, the number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% in the next two decades. This gives us all the more reason to recognize the progress that has been made because of discoveries by fundamental, or basic, cancer researchers. Our task now is to bring the benefits of that work to patients around the world. Check out this short video where Fadlo R. Khuri, MD, Deputy Director of Winship Cancer Institute discusses these discoveries in fundamental cancer research:

The theme of this year’s World Cancer Day, “Not Beyond Us,” highlights solutions that are within our reach. In that spirit, we celebrate 2014 as a landmark year for cancer research, discovery, treatment and prevention. Important progress was made in a number of areas: screening and prevention of cancers, development of novel targeted therapies for cancers, and immunotherapy of a number of previously resistant diseases. Over the past year, we saw at least a half dozen new approvals by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) of new, improved, potent targeted therapies, chemotherapies, and immunotherapies for cancer, whose impact is most acutely felt in societies in North America, Europe, Eastern Asia, Australia and South America. Our therapeutic resources have been significantly advanced by these discoveries, all of which spring from major biologic breakthroughs in the laboratory. What should the next steps be in ensuring that the powerful tools of genomic medicine, immunology, and molecular imaging continue to flourish and impact cancer patients worldwide? How do we make sure that personalized, precision medicine can be practiced to benefit oncology patients globally?

Fundamental to progress in cancer diagnosis, treatment and prevention is continued investment in fundamental cancer research. In a decade in which the growth of real federal funding for basic and translational research in cancer has slowed noticeably in the United States, this challenge has been counterbalanced on some levels by substantial increases in investment in basic and translational research in Asia (China and India in particular), Europe (Germany and Great Britain in particular), and Australia. Nonetheless, research conducted in United States laboratories remains the major driver of cancer discovery in the areas of genomics, immunology, and prevention, and in the translation of these discoveries from the bench to the bedside, aided by accelerated developments in the biotech and pharmaceutical world. On-going support for researchers in the fundamental sciences will ensure that these new discoveries will continue to substantially enhance our therapeutic and preventive arsenal against cancer. Fundamental science is vital to the global war against cancer.

As discoveries accelerate, and increasing numbers of affordable new treatment modalities are brought into the clinic, making an impact on diseases from Africa and Australia, through Asia and Europe, and all the way to the Americas, we must continue to support, guard, and mentor our treasure trove of outstanding scientists and clinical investigators. Over the next several decades, these individuals will be the key to sustaining and accelerating the major advances that are being made against cancer. Discoveries in the labs of outstanding scientists in basic immunology, genomics, glycomics and metabolomics, and in understanding the biologic behavior of normal, pre-malignant, and cancerous cells, pave the way for clinical translations that improve the prevention and therapy of our global population as a whole.

About Dr. Khuri

Fadlo Khuri, MDFadlo R. Khuri, MD, deputy director of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, professor and chairman of the Department of Hematology & Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, and executive associate dean for research of Emory University, is a leading researcher and physician in the treatment of lung and head and neck cancers. He is Editor-in-Chief of the American Cancer Society’s peer-reviewed journal, Cancer.

Dr. Khuri’s contributions have been recognized by a number of national awards, including the prestigious 2013 Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award, given to an outstanding cancer researcher by the American Association for Cancer Research.

An accomplished molecular oncologist and translational thought leader, Dr. Khuri has conducted seminal research on oncolytic viral therapy, developed molecular-targeted therapeutic approaches for lung and head and neck tumors combining signal transduction inhibitors with chemotherapy, and has led major chemoprevention efforts in lung and head and neck cancers. Dr. Khuri’s clinical interests include thoracic and head and neck oncology. His research interests include development of molecular, prognostic, therapeutic, and chemopreventive approaches to improve the standard of care for patients with tobacco related cancers. His laboratory is investigating the mechanism of action of signal transduction inhibitors in lung and aerodigestive track cancers.

Plugging Cell Biology Into a Genomic World

(This blog was originally posted on January 15, 2014 on the American Association for Cancer Research website)

Personalized oncology epitomizes the concept of interdisciplinary research where pathologists, bioinformaticians, oncologists, and biologists work together to identify and ultimately target drivers of cancer. We gather at tables to collaborate across disciplines and try to speak the same language with the goals of advancing knowledge and helping patients. As a cancer cell biologist at the Winship Cancer Institute, I have been privileged to be a part of these conversations and to contribute to our efforts to understand tumor biology.

When most researchers talk about personalized (or precision) oncology, genomics is usually an important part of the conversation. Genomic technologies can yield tremendous amounts of information in a relatively unbiased and high-throughput manner. Cell biology, on the other hand, which has interested me for over 15 years, provides a powerful and focused approach to probe the behavior and function of cells, organelles, and proteins. Tremendous leaps have been made over the last two decades that have enhanced our ability to “see” biology due to the advent of technologies such as genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and new imaging modalities. In fact, the Nobel Prize has been awarded twice in the last decade to imaging-based technologies, most recently this past October to the inventors of super-resolution imaging.

Despite these differing approaches, cell biology and genomics are not mutually exclusive; cell (and molecular) biology data are routinely combined with genomic data as a means to validate results. But can cell biology and genomics be more than validation partners? Could a marriage between the focused spatial and temporal power of cell biology with the throughput of genomics create a “best of both worlds” scenario to enhance personalization of cancer treatment?

Watch Dr. Marcus’ TEDx Peachtree talk, “Every Cancer Is Personal.”

As we move into a world of single-cell genomics, we are beginning to unravel the importance of obtaining information from one cell, and consequently yielding tremendous insight into tumor biology, especially tumor heterogeneity and rare cell types. Several strong lines of evidence now suggest that it may be rare cell types, such as cancer stem cells, that are required for initiation and progression of cancer. The ability to develop new methods that can precisely select these rare cell types, perhaps even while the cells are alive using cellular imaging-based approaches, would allow these rare genomes to be extracted. Perhaps, down the road, approaches rooted in cell biology may help provide more temporal -omics where researchers can monitor changes in the transcriptome of single cells or groups of cells over time to understand single tumor cell evolution during initiation, progression, and treatment.

It is not that cell biology is so unique; rather, it is the concept of marrying two research approaches to create a scientific synergy. The advances that are made through interdisciplinary research in the laboratories will not only provide new insight into the biology of cancer but can ultimately impact patients through personalized oncology. The late Steve Jobs said, “Creativity is just about connecting things.” We need to continue to connect things in the lab to create new opportunities in the clinic.

About Dr. Marcus


Adam Marcus, PhDAdam Marcus received his PhD in cell biology from Penn State University in 2002 and went on to do a post-doctoral fellowship in cancer pharmacology at Emory University. Dr. Marcus is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine and has developed his own laboratory at Winship Cancer Institute, which focuses on cell biology and pharmacology in lung and breast cancer. His laboratory studies how cancer cells invade and metastasize using a combination of molecular and imaging-based approaches. Marcus has been a member of the American Association for Cancer Research since 2003. You can follow him on Twitter at  @NotMadScientist.

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Every Cancer Is Personal

Every Cancer is Personal

As a cancer researcher, I’ve delivered plenty of lectures, but nothing compares with a talk I gave in October to an audience of 500 strangers. My TEDx address focused on how the treatment and diagnosis of cancer is becoming more personal. Scientists across the world are going all-in on determining the driving genetic changes for each individual cancer to better personalize treatment for each patient. In my talk, I tried to emphasize where hope lives for cancer treatment in the next 5-10 years based upon this approach and how my laboratory at the Winship Cancer Institute is contributing to this effort.

Although I went into the day looking to impact others, I never expected the event to have such an impact on me. There were a dozen speakers that day with talks ranging from robotics and mathematics to tap dancing and beatboxing. The day of mass-education concluded with an impromptu parade throughout the Buckhead theatre. Hundreds of adults dressed in business attire lined up and were parading, dancing, singing and beatboxing. People that barely knew each other enjoyed interacting and sharing ideas throughout the day with the primary purpose of learning. I was clearly not in the familiar lecture halls and laboratories at the Emory School of Medicine, but I felt right at home and was happy to share my passion and knowledge about a subject that impacts so many of us.

About Dr. Marcus

Adam Marcus, PhDAdam Marcus received his PhD in cell biology from Penn State University in 2002 and went on to do a post-doctoral fellowship in cancer pharmacology at Emory University. Dr. Marcus is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine and has developed his own laboratory which focuses on cell biology and pharmacology in lung and breast cancer. Dr. Marcus’ laboratory studies how cancer cells invade and metastasize using a combination of molecular and imaging-based approaches. For more information about Dr. Marcus and his outreach and research efforts, please use the related resources links below. You can also follow Dr. Marcus on Twitter at @NotMadScientist.

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Latest in Breast Cancer Research

According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, 10%-20% of diagnosed breast cancers are determined to be triple negative breast cancer. It tends to primarily affect younger, premenopausal women and is more aggressive than other types of breast cancer. Studies show that African-American and Hispanic women are more likely to be diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer than white women. Triple negative breast cancers don’t have the three types of receptors that most commonly fuel breast cancer growth — estrogen, progesterone and the HER2 gene — so they don’t respond to hormonal therapies and treatments that target those receptors. Chemotherapy is typically used for treatment, but there is an urgent need to find more precise therapies.

LaTonia Taliaferro-Smith, PhD, is one of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University’s scientists who have taken up the challenge to develop more targeted therapies. In her lab research, Taliaferro-Smith searches for alternative targets in the triple negative breast cancer cell. She works closely with Winship physician-researchers toward the goal of developing drugs that will benefit patients with this disease.

“I’m very hopeful about the research we’re doing here and what Winship is offering to triple negative breast cancer patients,” says Taliaferro-Smith. “Oftentimes when patients hear a triple negative diagnosis, they think there are no options and ultimately their endpoint is death. But we’re very encouraged here at Winship because we do have active research that is trying to find alternative therapies for these particular patients, so we can let them know that you will have treatment options available hopefully in the near future.”

Check out the video below as Dr. Taliaferro- Smith discusses the continuous work research teams at Winship are doing to develop more precise treatment therapies for triple negative breast cancer:

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Learn more about breast cancer care at Winship at Emory. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and our breast care teams want you to know that early detection is key to survival. Have questions about the role of screening in early breast cancer detection? Join us for a live web chat with a breast imaging expert on October 21, 204.

Winship’s Win the Fight 5K Exceeds Fundraising Goal to Help Battle Cancer

Winship Win the Fight 5K RecapThis past weekend,  Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University raised a record amount of money towards cancer research in Georgia. Fundraising support, through the 4th annual Winship Win the Fight 5K, which was held on Saturday, September 27, 2014, surpassed its half-million dollar goal and brought in more than $582,000. Over three thousand runners and walkers gathered Saturday morning to participate in the event that started and ended on the Emory campus and wound its way through the surrounding Druid Hills-area.

“We are so grateful to all the supporters who joined us at this year’s Winship 5K,” says Walter J. Curran, Jr., MD, executive director of Winship. “The money raised will support more than a dozen cancer research projects at Winship and will lead us to more and more success stories in our fight against cancer.”

The Winship Win the Fight 5K is a unique event because it allows participants to select the specific area(s) of cancer research they want their tax-deductible donations to benefit. Donations are still being accepted until November 14, 2014. For more information, visit the Winship Win the Fight 5K website.

And make sure to mark your calendars for the 5th annual Winship Win the Fight 5K, which will be held on Saturday, October 3, 2015.

Winship Win the Fight 5K

Winship Fight 5KThe Winship Win the Fight 5K is this Saturday, September 27, 2014 and already a HALF A MILLION DOLLARS has been raised towards cancer research at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

There’s still time to be a part of this special event! Today is the last day to register online for Saturday’s event. If you cannot be present to run or walk this weekend, register as a “Sleep-In Warrior” to support cancer research from wherever you will be this weekend.

For more information, or to register, visit the Winship Win the Fight 5K website. Also, check out this inspiring video below featuring WSB-TV’s Mark Winne’s wife, Kate, a cancer survivor and Winship patient. Mark and Kate’s story not only shows the crucial role cancer research plays in the continuous fight for a world without cancer, but also the hope it beings to patients and families, here and now.

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Running to Carry Forth a Father’s Passion to Make a Difference…

What the Inside of an Operating Room is Like During a Life-Saving Procedure

Operating RoomIt’s 7 a.m. and the surgical staff at Emory University Hospital is prepping a patient for a potentially life-saving procedure. As a surgical oncologist at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, I am leading one of the two groups of specialists working together to remove a type of stomach tumor known as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). This is a rare tumor with approximately 10,000 new cases diagnosed in the Unites States every year. If left untouched, the tumor could enlarge or metastasize, requiring more radical treatment.

Stomach tumors are usually removed using one of two common techniques: endoscopy, in which doctors enter through the patient’s mouth using a flexible tube outfitted with a miniature camera and lasso-like device; or surgery, in which surgeons use minimally-invasive laparoscopic techniques to insert tiny surgical instruments through small incisions in the abdomen.

For this particular case, Dr. Field Willingham, Director of Endoscopy in the Emory Division of Digestive Diseases, and I are performing a groundbreaking hybrid procedure using both laparoscopy and endoscopy simultaneously, which allows us to reach tumors located in difficult areas of the stomach. In many cases, this procedure leads to the complete and safe removal of the tumor with fewer complications and/or long-term problems for the patient.

During the actual procedure, I begin by using laparoscopic tools to push the tumor from the outer side of the stomach so the more easily Dr. Willingham can grab the bulge from inside the stomach using an endoscopic cutting loop. I am able to push the tumor into the lumen of the stomach and Dr. Willingham successfully removes the tumor using a surgical snare technique. Next, Dr. Willingham pushes the area of the stomach where we removed the tumor from towards me. That allows me to hold the wall of the stomach and cut away any remaining tumor cells that may have been left behind.

By 10 a.m., the keyhole-sized incisions in the patient’s abdomen are being stitched closed. This particular operation is a complete success! We have safely removed the malignancy, leaving the patient’s lifestyle and ability to eat intact.

Emory was one of the first medical centers in the country to use this hybrid technique. We work closely with our colleagues in Gastroenterology to remove these complex tumors without requiring the patient to go through invasive surgery or complete organ removal.

While developing and performing innovative procedures like this is made easier by advanced technology and surgical techniques, a key to overall success is the multi-disciplinary team approach. While it helps that Dr. Willingham and I are friends outside of the operating room, it is very important as colleagues that we communicate and collaborate with one another, especially during complex cases such as this GIST surgery. Leaning on each other’s area of expertise, while sharing the same goal of doing what is best for our patient, leads to successful outcomes only achieved by working together.

See Dr. Maithel and Dr. Willingham performing this innovative procedure in the video below!

About Dr. Maithel

Shishir Maithel, MDShishir K. Maithel, MD, FACS, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, is a surgical oncologist at Winship Cancer Institute. Dr. Maithel specializes in treating gastrointestinal cancers, cancer of the liver, bile duct and pancreas, and retroperitoneal sarcoma. Dr. Maithel joined Emory in 2009 from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York where he completed his fellowship in both surgical oncology and hepatopancreatobiliary surgery. He completed his residency and internship at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Maithel earned his Medical Degree at the University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, graduating Alpha Omega Alpha.

Bringing the Invisible Into Georgia Classrooms

Microscope view of cellsOn many university campuses there is a dark room that has no windows and the walls are painted black. People wearing white lab coats enter and rest their eyes on top of what I think to be one the most magnificent instruments in a science laboratory, the microscope. These microscopes, which are no bigger than a desk but can cost more than a house, rest gently on a cushion of air and serve the purpose of making the invisible world, visible.

I was hooked the first time I peered into one of these microscopes. All of a sudden this entirely new and previously invisible world moved into focus right in front of me. Tiny creatures that I had apparently been living with, were visible for the first time. I eventually turned my obsession with the microscopic world into a career. I am a scientist at a major medical school and my laboratory’s research is to study how cancer cells work, with the goal of creating new cancer treatments. My team and I have killed cancer cells with new medicines, burst them open, blasted them with radiation, and blocked them from spreading. We do this with the hope that our research will lead to new cancer treatments, make older treatments better, or help diagnose cancer.

Now I have been trying to bring this fascination for microscopes and cells into the classrooms of children around the state of Georgia with my program Students for Science. Through this program I have traveled to over 200 K-12 classrooms and seen over 2000 children in about 35 schools. I usually travel with three microscopes, computers, and cameras, and I bring with me other Winship Cancer Institute scientists, scientists in training from our graduate school, and Emory University undergraduates. Our goal is to inspire critical thinking in K-12 schools by providing them with hands-on, thought-provoking science activities that use the microscope. We have worked with the school students to see their own cheek cells, pond water, microorganisms in dirt, moss, bugs, and plants. I also show them real science movies taken on the microscopes at Emory to promote critical thinking and age-appropriate discussion about science and cancer.

I think that all of us participating in the program believe in its potential long-term benefit of growing the next generation of Georgia scientists. One of our major goals is to have the school students see real scientists to make the possibility of becoming a scientist more tangible. In addition, for me personally it is the excitement and thrill that the children show the first time they peer down the microscope and observe cells zipping across the microscope slide. Some children show fascination, others bewilderment, and some just scream out loud. These reactions are priceless and motivate me to continue to grow the program, see more classrooms, and help educate our youngest scientists.

About Dr. Marcus
Dr. Adam MarcusAdam Marcus received his PhD in cell biology from Penn State University in 2002 and went on to do a post-doctoral fellowship in cancer pharmacology at Emory University. Dr. Marcus is an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Medicine and has developed his own laboratory which focuses on cell biology and pharmacology in lung and breast cancer. Dr. Marcus’ laboratory studies how cancer cells invade and metastasize using a combination of molecular and imaging-based approaches. For more information about Dr. Marcus and his outreach and research efforts, please use the related resources links below. You can also follow Dr. Marcus on Twitter at @NotMadScientist.

 

 

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Cancer Risk Dramatically Reduced Since Landmark Smoking Report Issued 50 years Ago

Dr. Fadlo KhuriFifty years ago this month, Dr. Luther Terry, Surgeon General of the United States, issued the landmark 1964 Surgeon General’s Report providing the first definitive proof that cigarette smoking causes both lung and laryngeal cancer. This announcement came after a committee of experts had worked for 18 months, reviewing more than 7,000 published papers and engaging 150 consultants.

The importance of this report and its findings cannot be overstated. Fifty years ago, we did not know that smoking definitely causes lung cancer and other diseases, only that smoking was associated with a higher risk of these diseases. Recognizing that the impact of tobacco on our national and, indeed, the world’s health was the major public health issue of the day, Dr. Terry assembled an unimpeachable panel of distinguished physicians and scientists. He chose individuals for the panel who were not only among the giants of medicine and science, but were also objective and could ensure the integrity of the report.

The report was based on what ranked as the largest and most careful review of the medical literature yet undertaken. Most importantly, the report was clear, evidence based and unequivocal. It showed beyond a shadow of a doubt that smoking caused both lung cancer and larynx cancer. The report concluded that cigarette smoking is 1) a cause of lung cancer and laryngeal cancer in men; 2) a probable cause of lung cancer in women; and 3) the most important cause of chronic bronchitis.

The impact of the report on public perception was astonishing. In 1958, only 44% of Americans believed that smoking seriously impacted health, according to a Gallup Poll. Ten years later, and four years after the report’s release, that number had climbed to 78%. The report also galvanized the anti-tobacco movement. Its findings have lent enormous credence to smoking cessation efforts over the last 50 years. In 1964, 52% of adult men and 35% of adult women smoked cigarettes. This had fallen to 21.6% of adult men and 16.5% of adult women by 2011.

Today, we are certain that tobacco causes some of the most widespread and devastating diseases in the world, including cancers of the lung, larynx (voice box), esophagus, mouth, throat and bladder, which together account for about 30% of the world’s cancer-related deaths. Tobacco is also a major cause of heart disease, emphysema and other diseases of the lungs and heart.

There have been several subsequent reports issued by the Surgeons General, the latest an eye-opening look at smoking behavior among the younger generation. This, like all prior reports, builds on that first landmark report from a great physician leader and his matchless panel of experts. The impact of their efforts on smoking in the US and the world is unquestionable. The debt that the world owes these 12 brave scientists has never been greater.

Author: Fadlo R. Khuri, MD, deputy director, Winship Cancer Institute

Want to learn more about the impact of the 1964 Surgeon General’s Report on smoking? View this video as Dr. Khuri further discusses the effect the report has had on the medical community.

About Dr. Fadlo Khuri
Fadlo R. Khuri, MD, deputy director of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Hematology & Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, is a leading researcher and physician in the treatment of lung and head and neck cancers. He is Editor-in-Chief of the American Cancer Society’s peer-reviewed journal, Cancer.

Dr. Khuri’s contributions have been recognized by a number of national awards, including the prestigious 2013 Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award, given to an outstanding cancer researcher by the American Association for Cancer Research.

An accomplished molecular oncologist and translational thought leader, Dr. Khuri has conducted seminal research on oncolytic viral therapy, developed molecular-targeted therapeutic approaches for lung and head and neck tumors combining signal transduction inhibitors with chemotherapy, and has led major chemoprevention efforts in lung and head and neck cancers. Dr. Khuri’s clinical interests include thoracic and head and neck oncology. His research interests include development of molecular, prognostic, therapeutic, and chemopreventive approaches to improve the standard of care for patients with tobacco related cancers. His laboratory is investigating the mechanism of action of signal transduction inhibitors in lung and aerodigestive track cancers.

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