Posts Tagged ‘breast cancer prevention’

Growing Hope Together!

Mary BrookhartI was diagnosed with breast cancer at the young age of 33. A cancer diagnosis always comes as a shock, but it’s particularly unexpected at that age. Because my mother had breast cancer at a young age, a new provider sent me for my base line screening mammogram and that turned out to be my first and only mammogram. I can say without a doubt that a mammogram saved my life.

I was treated here at Winship, by Dr. Toncred Styblo and Dr. David Lawson. Twenty-five years later, all three of us are still here. I came back to Winship six years ago, but not as a patient. I took a job as supervisor of business operations for the Glenn Family Breast Center at Winship, and I am one of the organizers of the Celebration of Living event coming up this Sat., June 21.

That’s why the Celebration of Living event is so near and dear to my heart. This is a chance to get together with other survivors, and discover that part of being a survivor is learning that it’s ok to let fun and humor back into your life. Learn to let the fear go and not let it rule your life. Coming to the Celebration of Living event can be a first step toward getting back out into the world, or it can be a continuation of your on-going journey. We all know that battling cancer has very dark moments, but I hope we can bring some hope and lightness into your life.

So I invite all cancer survivors, their family members and friends to come share this special day. There will be workshops for the mind, body and soul, as well as music, food and companionship. It’s free and open to all. Detailed information is available on our website.

I see more and more people surviving cancer because of new and better treatments and earlier detection. In the time since I got my screening mammogram, the technology has greatly improved. Emory and Winship are now offering state-of-the-art 3D mammograms (also called tomosynthesis) at no additional charge above the cost of standard mammograms, so that all women can benefit from this more precise screening technology. For more information about this new service and where it’s available, check out this video about 3D mammography at Emory Healthcare.

For some, the idea of living a normal lifespan with cancer as a chronic disease is a reality.

My hope is that one day, all cancer patients will enjoy a lifetime of survivorship.

Mary Brookhart,
Cancer Survivor

About Mary Brookhart

Mary Brookhart grew up in Ohio before moving to Georgia to get away from the snow. There she enjoyed a 20+ year career in advertising and design. In 2008, looking for something more rewarding, Mary returned to Winship, this time, not as a patient, but as supervisor of business operations for the Emory Glenn Family Breast Center. Besides serving as an advocate for breast cancer patients, Mary coordinates screenings for mammograms and the Emory’s Breast Cancer Seminar for the Newly Diagnosed breast cancer patient. She currently lives in rural Conyers, with her husband of 37 years, and their three horses.

Foods That Fight Breast Cancer For You!

Nutrition to Fight CancerOur experts at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University cannot stress enough the importance of incorporating a healthy diet and exercise plan into everyday life, not only for cancer and disease prevention, but also maintenance to prevent recurrence after treatment.

Winship oncology nutritionist, Tiffany Barrett, recently sat down with CNN to discuss foods that help in the fight against cancer, no matter what stage. Some key advice: include a variety of colorful fruits and veggies, eat whole grains, fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids and soy in moderation.

Check out the video below to hear the full version of Tiffany’s discussion on breast cancer fighting foods.

Related Resources:

Breast Cancer – Understanding Risk Factors & Preventing Recurrence

Joan Giblin, Winship Cancer Institute

Joan Giblin, Survivorship Program Director, Winship Cancer Institute

Author: Joan Giblin, NP, Director of Survivorship, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

Substantial research conducted over the last few decades demonstrates that being overweight at the time of a breast cancer diagnosis may result in less favorable outcomes. This information—coupled with the fact that many women are indeed overweight at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis and additional weight gain during treatment is frequently reported—means that for a woman diagnosed with breast cancer, achieving or maintaining a desirable weight may be one of the most important lifestyle pursuits they can make in the interest of their overall health and wellness.

Much of the research around breast cancer has supported the theory that excess weight at the time of diagnosis can lead to a worse prognosis. Recently, analyses conducted on a group of nonsmoking breast cancer survivors corroborated these findings. According to the study’s findings, women who increased their body mass index (BMI) by 0.5 to 2 units were found to have a 40% greater chance of breast cancer recurrence, and those who gained more than 2 BMI units had a 53% greater chance of recurrence. Data suggests that being overweight or obese adversely influences not only cancer-specific outcomes, but also overall health and quality of life. As a result, weight management is now considered a priority standard of care for overweight women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer.

Research around breast cancer also suggests that the weight gain experienced by women who have undergone chemotherapy or hormone treatments seems to be the result of increased tissue mass, with no change or a decrease in lean body mass. This unfavorable shift in body composition suggests that steps should be taken to not only curb weight gain during treatment, but also to preserve or rebuild muscle mass. Moderate physical activity (especially resistance training) during and after breast cancer treatment may help survivors maintain lean muscle mass while avoiding the accumulation of excess body fat.

Additional research is currently under way to evaluate the effects of dietary patterns on cancer-specific outcomes, as well as overall health. One observational study found that dietary pattern was important for overall survival among breast cancer patients, with those who ate a Western diet having poorer overall survival and those who ate a dietary pattern characterized by high amounts of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains having better survival rates overall. Furthermore, this theory is supported by data on breast cancer survivors participating in the Nurses’ Health Study. Participants were followed for nearly 10 years post-diagnosis, and study findings suggest that those who consume a healthy diet, with higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and lower intakes of added sugar, refined grains, and animal products, may not have had significantly lower rates of recurrence or cancer-specific mortality.

A topic of controversy as it relates to breast cancer risk and prognosis is alcohol consumption. Alcohol is an unusual factor, as it presents both risks and benefits to those with breast cancer. In the general population, clear and consistent evidence links moderate alcohol intake (1-2 drinks per day) with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. For breast cancer survivors, however, the decision to drink alcoholic beverages at moderate levels is complex because they must consider their levels of risk for recurrent or second primary breast cancer as well as cardiovascular disease. See our post on the relationship between alcohol and breast cancer for more information.

It is important to remember that lifestyle, nutrition and physical activity recommendations to reduce the risks of a second primary breast cancer and heart disease are especially important for breast cancer survivors. Diet for those at high risk for breast cancer or with a breast cancer diagnosis should emphasize vegetables and fruits, have low amounts of saturated fats, and include sufficient dietary fiber. Most importantly, breast cancer patients and survivors should strive to achieve and maintain a healthy weight through eating a well-balanced diet and regular exercise. In addition, regular physical activity should be maintained regardless of any weight-related concerns.

Table 1. American Cancer Society Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Prevention and Cancer Survivorship.
Achieve and maintain a healthy weight.
• If overweight or obese, limit consumption of high-calorie foods and beverages and increase physical activity to promote weight loss. Engage in regular physical activity.
Engage in regular physical activity.
• Avoid inactivity and return to normal daily activities as soon as possible following diagnosis.
• Aim to exercise at least 150 minutes per week.
• Include strength training exercises at least 2 days per week.
Achieve a dietary pattern that is high in vegetables, fruits, and whole grains.
• Follow the American Cancer Society Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Prevention.

 

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A few Healthy Resolutions to Consider Before the New Year

Your Health Resolutions in the New YearRecent news that even a small bit of alcohol consumption increases a woman’s risk of breast cancer got me thinking. The authors of the study, published in early November in the Journal of the American Medical Association, talked in news media interviews about the fact that many respondents might actually have under-reported their alcohol consumption. They went on to say that it is very important to accurately report your lifestyle habits when your doctor asks.

So here’s what got me thinking. A few years back, I had a breast cancer scare. Perhaps the fear made me especially conscientious about reporting any bad habits – you know, fear being a powerful motivator and all.

When the nurse asked me about whether I smoked, I was able to honestly answer a resounding “NO!” When she asked whether I exercised, I was able to report honestly that I exercise at least five days a week. Then, when she asked whether I drank and how much, that one had me a little nervous.

I don’t know what it was – stress, too much travel associated with my job or just the plain seductive powers of alcohol and my own enjoyment of it – but I was a bit concerned about my alcohol consumption. During that time of my life, I was drinking probably seven to 10 drinks a week, way more than I ever did in the past. I had been a little worried, but, wow, with the thought of a 3 cm mass in my breast, I was really concerned. Time to ‘fess up and come out with the truth, which I did at that time and planned to continue to do when I later sought a second opinion.

It was a few months later when I sought that opinion. To prepare for my visit, I asked for records from the hospital at which I had previously sought treatment (I did not have breast cancer, but still had many questions about the mass). I got the records, checked them out, and there on the exam notes, it said that “patient reports having 10 shots of alcohol a day.” Holy moley! I almost fell off my chair.

In my first visit, I had disclosed to my nurse that I was consuming between 7-10 drinks per week. I was shocked to see such a glaring error when that number was erroneously reported as 7-10 drinks per day! The word “shot” also really got to me!

Images of me stumbling up to a bar, saying “hit me again, sister” came to mind. Ten shots a day? I wouldn’t have been able to work, drive or even eat, it seemed to me.

The incident brought home a few things to me. First, how important it is to be transparent with your medical team and to make sure you are aware of the content of your medical records. In hindsight, if I had seen my records earlier, I would have been able to correct the misreporting of my information. Furthermore, if the information they thought I disclosed about my drinking was alarming, I wish we would have discussed it. If this step had been taken, it would have clarified the errors in my records and also, would have made me feel more comfortable as a patient knowing my care team was on top of it and truly cared about me.

So when this recent news story came out about a slightly elevated risk of breast cancer existing in women who drink even moderately, I realized a few things. First, I need to take ownership of my health, including all my lifestyle issues and behaviors that can affect my risk of getting cancer.  That means not smoking, getting regular exercise, little to no drinking, eating lots of fruits and vegetables, avoiding excessive sun exposure and maintaining a healthy body weight.

It also means enlisting the aid of my healthcare providers and asking them for help in my problem areas. And it means absolute transparency is required when I report my lifestyle habits – as is making sure my habits are recorded accurately! This has changed the way I think about who plays a role in my care. Through this experience I have realized that I must take part in and own my healthcare and partner with providers I trust are willing to help fill in any gaps I may leave behind.

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Breast Cancer Questions? Dr. Styblo Has Your Answers

Breast Cancer Doctor Chat

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer affecting women. In fact, 13% of all women will develop breast cancer in their lives. Many women are concerned about their risk for breast cancer, and are unsure what their next steps should be. Our doctors frequently get questions such as, Is getting yearly check-ups sufficient? At what age should I start scheduling regular mammograms? What symptoms should I look out for?

Are you concerned about breast cancer? If you have unanswered questions related to breast cancer, look no further. To kick off October as Breast Cancer Awareness Month, surgical oncologist and breast surgeon at the Winship Cancer Institute, Dr. Toncred Styblo will be hosting a live 1-hour web chat to answer all of your breast cancer questions.

Wonder if you’re at high risk for developing breast cancer and what you should do? Dr. Styblo will provide guidance on how to determine if you are high risk and steps you can take if you are. And as an expert in surgical oncology, Dr. Styblo will also be able to answer questions related to breast cancer treatment and surgical options.

Don’t forget, early detection is key to providing the best chance for cure. So take action and control of your health by scheduling your mammogram today and remind a friend to do the same! And, make sure to sign up for Dr. Styblo’s breast cancer chat and bring your questions with you. We’ll see you on October 4th for what’s sure to be a great discussion!