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Cancer
Coping with Survivor’s Guilt After Cancer
May 27, 2015 By Joy McCall, LCSW

cancer survivor guiltBeing diagnosed with cancer can bring on many different types of emotions from fear to sadness to relief; however, many patients don’t think about how they might feel after they complete their treatment. Many are surprised when they begin to feel guilty. This is known as survivor’s guilt. It is a feeling that is often experienced by those who have survived a major or traumatic event such as being diagnosed with cancer. The feelings may come from a sense of guilt that they survived the disease and another patient did not or they did well with treatment while another had a very difficult time recovering. Here are some things to keep in mind if you think you might be suffering from survivor's guilt:

  • You are not alone. Survivor’s guilt is very common. It is a natural response for many cancer patients. It often feels like sadness, depression or even grief.
  • Tell someone
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Cancer
Takeaways from the Pancreatic Cancer Live Chat at Winship
May 19, 2015 By Winship Cancer Institute

Pancreatic Cancer Chat Thanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, May 12th for the live online pancreatic cancer program chat at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University hosted by Drs. El-Rayes & Kooby. Drs. El-Rayes & Kooby answered several of your questions about pancreatic cancer risk factors, symptoms and therapy. There are a variety of treatment options for pancreatic cancer; for some patients, a combination of treatment methods may be used. Check out the conversation by viewing the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat: Question: Who is at the most risk for pancreatic cancer? David Kooby, MDDr. Kooby: Pancreatic cancer can affect anyone. People with a family history of pancreatic cancer in first degree relatives have an increased risk. Smokers are at risk, as tobacco appears to be a causative factor. Other groups who have an elevated risk of getting pancreatic cancer are [...]

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Cancer
What is Radiation Therapy and How is it Used to Treat Cancer?
May 18, 2015 By Karen Godette, MD, Medical Director, Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship at Emory University Hospital Midtown

Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that is used to shrink tumors and stop the growth of cancer cells. High energy x-rays are aimed directly at cancerous cells or tumors. According to the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the technique is so effective in treating many different types of cancer that nearly two-thirds of all cancer patients will receive radiation therapy at some time during the course of their cancer treatment. Depending on the type of cancer being treated, radiation may be used as a stand-alone treatment and often it is the only treatment needed. Or, it may be used in combination with surgery, chemotherapy and/or other targeted therapies. For example, doctors may use radiation therapy to shrink a tumor before surgery, or after surgery to stop the growth of any cancer cells that may be left behind. Watch the video below to learn about [...]

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Cancer
Scientists of the Next Generation
May 11, 2015 By Adam Marcus, PhD, Director of Emory School of Medicine-Winship Cancer Institute Integrated Cellular Imaging Core

As children we have all been to the doctor, visited the dentist, perhaps even sat in the cockpit of a plane. Anyone ever sit in front of a cryo-electron microscope, play with the dials on a mass spectrometer, or manipulate the genetic code? Most of us probably did not have that opportunity. I surely did not. So how will children, that is, our next generation of scientists, even consider being a scientist without ever knowing what a scientist does? I am a cancer biologist with a lab focused on cancer metastasis (spread of the cancer). We study how cancer metastasis occurs in subtypes of patients to develop new treatments designed for these particular patients. On the side, I have also traveled throughout Georgia visiting over 3,000 students in K-12th grade to teach them about science and scientists. I have had the fortunate experience of visiting over 40 schools ranging from [...]

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Cancer
It’s Melanoma Awareness Monday: Reduce Your Risk
May 4, 2015 By Suephy Chen, MD, MS

melanoma awarenessDid you know that melanoma cases in the United States are growing faster than any other cancer? Malignant melanoma is a type of skin cancer that can be deadly if it spreads throughout the body. It usually grows near the surface of the skin and then begins to grow deeper, increasing the risk of spread to other organs. Detecting and removing a malignant melanoma early can result in a complete cure. Removal after the tumor has spread may not be effective. Melanoma can occur anywhere on the skin, including areas that are difficult for self-examination. Many melanomas are first noticed by other family members. Most patients with early melanoma have no skin discomfort whatsoever. See a doctor when a mole suddenly appears or changes. Itching, burning or pain in a pigmented lesion should cause suspicion, Visual examination remains the most reliable method for identifying a malignant [...]

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Cancer
Kidney-Saving Robotics & Education
Apr 27, 2015 By John G. Pattaras, MD, FACS

Saving kidneys from cancerous tumors and stones using minimally invasive techniques is my specialty. I've performed nearly 200 kidney operations in the last year alone and I recently launched a robotic kidney tumor program for Winship Cancer Institute at Emory Saint Joseph's Hospital. Kidneys are essential to life but most people aren’t aware of their extraordinary function until there's a problem. As a vital organ, kidneys are a filter for the body and they make urine to rid the body of waste toxins. How would you know if you have a possible kidney concern? Check for a change when going to the bathroom. Kidney cancers in the early stages usually do not cause any signs or symptoms, but patients will sometimes experience signs that should be brought to a doctor’s attention, such as:

  • Noticing blood or very dark urine
  • Flank/back pain on one side (not caused by injury)
  • A
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Cancer
5 Early-Distress Warnings of Digestive Cancer
Apr 20, 2015 By Winship Cancer Institute

pancreatic cancer live chatWhen you think of digestion you probably don’t think about the pancreas, but it sits right behind the stomach and works to provide essential digestive functions. The pancreas, only about 4- 6 inches long, is widely known for producing insulin, an important hormone that regulates blood sugar levels, but it also assists the body in the absorption of nutrients into the small intestine. Pancreatic cancer increases with age and most people are between 60 to 80 years old when diagnosed. Early pancreatic cancer often does not cause symptoms, however there are five early warning signs that we can all be aware of to better advocate for our health.

  1. Yellow eyes or skin.  The pancreas uses a greenish-brown fluid made in the gallbladder, called bile, to help the small intestine in digestion. If a tumor starts in the head of the pancreas, it can block or press on the bile duct and
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Cancer
Take Steps Now to Prevent Cancer
Apr 13, 2015 By Anand Jillella, MD

April CancerApril is Cancer Control Month. That means we need to find ways to reduce our risk of cancer as well as the chances that we’ll die from the disease. We have a tough job ahead. Before the year is over, nearly 1.7 million Americans will be newly diagnosed with cancer. It’s a sobering statistic and one that we can impact in a big way by taking steps now to help prevent the second leading cause of death in the United States. If you’re a smoker, find a way quit. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, smoking cigarettes can cause cancer in almost any part of the body and is responsible for some of the most deadly types of the disease. As an oncologist, I would recommend that you stay away from all tobacco products and byproducts, including second hand smoke. It is estimated that one in three Americans is now obese. Obesity is proven to be a major risk [...]

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Cancer
Screenings Help Catch Head and Neck Cancers
Apr 6, 2015 By Mark El-Deiry, MD, FACS, Head and Neck Surgical Oncologist and Microvascular Reconstructive Surgeon, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

head and  neck cancer screeningsA recent study reported in JAMA Otolaryngology found that most Americans know little to nothing about head and neck cancers and could not name the most common symptoms and risk factors. This is a problem. If you wait months or even years to get a sore in your mouth or swelling in your neck checked by a doctor, you could be ignoring a sign of head and neck cancer that’s progressing. And, as with many other forms of cancer, the earlier a head and neck or oral cancer is diagnosed, the less invasive the treatment is and the higher the chance of cure. As a doctor who sees many patients with these cancers, one message comes through loud and clear: don’t ignore symptoms. On April 17th, doctors and staff with Emory’s Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery will hold a free head and neck screening at Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUHM). This is a chance for [...]

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Cancer
With a Little Help from Friends
Mar 30, 2015 By Lex Gilbert, Winship Cancer Survivor

lex gilbert cancer survivorI always assumed that cancer would catch up with me one day. After all, my mother and two of my aunts had breast cancer so I figured I must be next in line. Yet it never occurred to me that the rectal bleeding I’d been experiencing could be colon cancer. Surely the sigmoidoscopy ordered by my doctor would lead me to a quick fix and that would be that. Surprise! When I woke up after the procedure, she came to my bedside and told me I had colon cancer. When I heard those words I went numb. The world looked as it might if viewed through a funhouse mirror. I remember someone standing nearby handing me a box of Kleenex. I didn’t need the Kleenex. I didn’t cry until many weeks later and boy did I need Kleenex then. I think my soul just closed up shop so it could absorb the gravity of my situation at its own pace, and when it was ready to let go of the emotions, it let [...]

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