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Cancer
Kidney-Saving Robotics & Education
Apr 27, 2015 By John G. Pattaras, MD, FACS

Saving kidneys from cancerous tumors and stones using minimally invasive techniques is my specialty. I've performed nearly 200 kidney operations in the last year alone and I recently launched a robotic kidney tumor program for Winship Cancer Institute at Emory Saint Joseph's Hospital. Kidneys are essential to life but most people aren’t aware of their extraordinary function until there's a problem. As a vital organ, kidneys are a filter for the body and they make urine to rid the body of waste toxins. How would you know if you have a possible kidney concern? Check for a change when going to the bathroom. Kidney cancers in the early stages usually do not cause any signs or symptoms, but patients will sometimes experience signs that should be brought to a doctor’s attention, such as:

  • Noticing blood or very dark urine
  • Flank/back pain on one side (not caused by injury)
  • A
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Cancer
5 Early-Distress Warnings of Digestive Cancer
Apr 20, 2015 By Winship Cancer Institute

pancreatic cancer live chatWhen you think of digestion you probably don’t think about the pancreas, but it sits right behind the stomach and works to provide essential digestive functions. The pancreas, only about 4- 6 inches long, is widely known for producing insulin, an important hormone that regulates blood sugar levels, but it also assists the body in the absorption of nutrients into the small intestine. Pancreatic cancer increases with age and most people are between 60 to 80 years old when diagnosed. Early pancreatic cancer often does not cause symptoms, however there are five early warning signs that we can all be aware of to better advocate for our health.

  1. Yellow eyes or skin.  The pancreas uses a greenish-brown fluid made in the gallbladder, called bile, to help the small intestine in digestion. If a tumor starts in the head of the pancreas, it can block or press on the bile duct and
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Cancer
Take Steps Now to Prevent Cancer
Apr 13, 2015 By Anand Jillella, MD

Cancer Control MonthApril is Cancer Control Month. That means we need to find ways to reduce our risk of cancer as well as the chances that we’ll die from the disease. We have a tough job ahead. Before the year is over, nearly 1.7 million Americans will be newly diagnosed with cancer. It’s a sobering statistic and one that we can impact in a big way by taking steps now to help prevent the second leading cause of death in the United States. If you’re a smoker, find a way quit. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, smoking cigarettes can cause cancer in almost any part of the body and is responsible for some of the most deadly types of the disease. As an oncologist, I would recommend that you stay away from all tobacco products and byproducts, including second hand smoke. It is estimated that one in three Americans is now obese. Obesity is proven to be a major risk [...]

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Cancer
Screenings Help Catch Head and Neck Cancers
Apr 6, 2015 By Mark El-Deiry, MD, FACS, Head and Neck Surgical Oncologist and Microvascular Reconstructive Surgeon, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

head and  neck cancer screeningsA recent study reported in JAMA Otolaryngology found that most Americans know little to nothing about head and neck cancers and could not name the most common symptoms and risk factors. This is a problem. If you wait months or even years to get a sore in your mouth or swelling in your neck checked by a doctor, you could be ignoring a sign of head and neck cancer that’s progressing. And, as with many other forms of cancer, the earlier a head and neck or oral cancer is diagnosed, the less invasive the treatment is and the higher the chance of cure. As a doctor who sees many patients with these cancers, one message comes through loud and clear: don’t ignore symptoms. On April 17th, doctors and staff with Emory’s Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery will hold a free head and neck screening at Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUHM). This is a chance for [...]

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Cancer
With a Little Help from Friends
Mar 30, 2015 By Lex Gilbert, Winship Cancer Survivor

lex gilbert cancer survivorI always assumed that cancer would catch up with me one day. After all, my mother and two of my aunts had breast cancer so I figured I must be next in line. Yet it never occurred to me that the rectal bleeding I’d been experiencing could be colon cancer. Surely the sigmoidoscopy ordered by my doctor would lead me to a quick fix and that would be that. Surprise! When I woke up after the procedure, she came to my bedside and told me I had colon cancer. When I heard those words I went numb. The world looked as it might if viewed through a funhouse mirror. I remember someone standing nearby handing me a box of Kleenex. I didn’t need the Kleenex. I didn’t cry until many weeks later and boy did I need Kleenex then. I think my soul just closed up shop so it could absorb the gravity of my situation at its own pace, and when it was ready to let go of the emotions, it let [...]

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Cancer
"Top Secret" Cancer Facts Worth Sharing
Mar 23, 2015 By Edith Brutcher, RN, MSN, ANP-BC, AOCNP, Lead Advanced Practice Provider for Medical Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

cancer secretsIt’s time to stop being embarrassed about the 3rd most commonly diagnosed cancer and the 3rd leading cause of cancer death for both men and women. More than 140,000 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year and nearly 50,000 will lose their battle to the disease according to The American Cancer Society. It's colon cancer awareness month – share the facts about how a colorectal cancer screening could save your life. A study, published in JAMA Surgery and recently reported in the NYT, showed that incidences of colorectal cancer have been decreasing by about 1 percent a year since the mid 1980s. Simply said, more people under the recommended screening age of 50 are being diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Colon cancer is not embarrassing. There's simply no sense in keeping secrets from your physician. If you have a history of colorectal cancer in your [...]

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Cancer
Taking a Stand in Favor of E-Cigarette Regulation
Mar 18, 2015 By Fadlo R. Khuri, MD, deputy director, Winship Cancer Institute

e-cigarette regulationIt has taken us over 50 years of careful regulation with tremendous pushback to strip the tobacco companies of their ability to aggressively and falsely market cigarettes as safe products. The advent and popularity of e-cigarettes could wipe out much of that progress and endanger an entire generation of young people who are attracted to the slickly packaged cartridges, marketed to a youthful generation as a safe alternative to tobacco burning cigarettes. I firmly believe that the United States Food and Drug Administration should have full authority to regulate e-cigarettes; the same full authority the agency currently has to regulate regular tobacco products. E-cigarettes are not made up of benign compounds. In fact, some of the ingredients such as formaldehyde are known carcinogens. With recent introductions of e-cigarettes from big tobacco companies such as Philip Morris, I [...]

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Cancer
Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle
Mar 9, 2015 By Tiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, Registered Dietitian at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Eat Healthy with CancerThe Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recognizes March as National Nutrition Month. This year’s theme, “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle,” encourages everyone, including individuals undergoing cancer treatment, to adopt plans focused on making informed eating choices and getting daily exercise to improve overall health. A healthy eating plan limits foods with added fats, sugars, and salt and emphasizes nutrient-rich foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, nuts and seeds. Nutritional needs should be met primarily through consuming food, not supplements, because whole foods provide a variety of other components that are considered beneficial to health. A healthy lifestyle is also more than just choosing to eat more fruits and vegetables. Age, gender, family history, and current health condition play a role in [...]

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Cancer
Cancer Clinical Study Leads to Video Tool for Prostate Cancer Patients
Mar 6, 2015 By Emory Healthcare

At Emory, research plays a key role in the mission to serve our patients and their families. Medical advances and improvements to patient care have been made possible by research and volunteer participation in clinical trials. More than 1,000 clinical trials are offered at Emory, making a difference in people’s lives, today. Recently, a clinical study initiated by Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, found that providing prostate cancer patients with a video-based education tool significantly improved their understanding of key terms necessary to making decisions about their treatment. The breakthrough study was led by three Winship at Emory investigators; Viraj Master, MD, PhD, FACS; Ashesh Jani, MD; and Michael Goodman, MD, MPH; and is the feature cover story of this month’s Cancer, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. In 2013, Master, [...]

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Cancer
When Your Partner Fails You
Mar 5, 2015 By Wendy Baer, MD

Cancer Support(This blog was originally posted on Friday, February 20, 2015 on the WebMD website) Along with the worries, sadness and frustrations of dealing with cancer, many patients experience the heartbreak of their loved one failing to support them. How could a life partner or spouse fail you during cancer? There are many ways, some more obvious than others. Jan’s husband never came to any appointments, ever. He never learned about her diagnosis, her treatment plan, the side effects of the medicines or the recommendations for how she might improve her energy and strength. He blamed the lymphedema in her arm after her surgery on her “lazy lifestyle.” He told her that support groups were for “wimps” and even took some of her pain medicine for himself. Sally’s partner came to every appointment – he would never let anyone else bring her. He kept a medical notebook with [...]

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