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Colorectal Cancer Awareness

Dr. Seth Rosen Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in both men and women in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates there will be 95,520 new cases of colon cancer and 39,910 new cases of rectal cancer in 2017.

What is Colorectal Cancer?

Most colorectal cancers start as a growth, called a polyp, in the inner lining of the colon or rectum and slowly progresses through the other layers. Removing a noncancerous polyp early can keep it from becoming a cancerous tumor, which is why screening is such an important tool for preventing this disease.

Colorectal Cancer Symptoms

Colorectal cancer doesn’t always cause symptoms. It’s important to get screened regularly.

If you do have symptoms, they may include:

  • Stomach pain, aches, or cramps that don’t go away
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Blood in stool
  • Unintended weight loss

If you develop symptoms, it’s important to talk to your doctor immediately.

Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors

Your risk for developing colorectal cancer increases as you get older. Younger adults can get colorectal cancer, but more than 90% of cases occur in people who are 50 years old or older.

Other risk factors include:

  • Inflammatory bowel diseases
  • Personal or Family History of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps
  • Tobacco use
  • Heavy alcohol use
  • Your racial and ethnic background
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Lack of regular physical activity
  • A diet low in fruits and vegetables
  • A low-fiber and high-fat diet
  • Overweight and obesity

Colorectal Cancer Screenings

Several tests are used to detect colorectal cancers, one of the most commonly used tests is a colonoscopy. During this test, the doctor uses a colonoscope (a thin tube with a small video camera on the end) to look at the entire length of the colon and rectum. Special instruments can be passed through the colonoscope to biopsy or remove any suspicious-looking polyps.

Other tests include:

  • Double-contrast barium enema (DCBE)
  • CT colonography (virtual colonoscopy)
  • Guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT)
  • Fecal immunochemical test (FIT)
  • Stool DNA test

When should I get screened? 

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that adults age 50 to 75 get screened for colorectal cancer. Adults age 76 to 85 should ask their doctor if they should be tested. However, you may need to get screened earlier than 50 if you meet certain risk factors.

If you believe you are at an increased risk for colorectal cancer, talk with your doctor to determine how often you should be tested and what screening is right for you.

Colorectal Cancer Treatments

There are many ways to treat colorectal cancer depending on its type and stage.

  • Some treatments may include local therapies such as: surgery, radiation therapy, ablation or embolization
    • These treatments are often used for earlier stage cancers
  • Systematic treatments including chemotherapy and targeted therapy may be used because they can reach cancer cells anywhere in the body

Next Steps

If you have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer, please call 404-778-1900 or 888-946-7447 to make an appointment or request an appointment online.

Winship Cancer Care

Your Winship multidisciplinary care team includes oncology surgeons, colorectal surgeons, radiologists, pathologists, pharmacists, nutritionists, social workers and advanced practice nurses with expertise in colorectal and gastrointestinal cancers. The benefits of our multidisciplinary and highly experienced teams include:

  • Access to doctors and surgeons who rank among the top colorectal cancer experts in the world
  • Weekly review of patient cases by the full team of experts
  • Coordinated scheduling for appointments among various specialties
  • Access to a nurse navigator to assist you throughout the treatment process
  • Access to support groups and education classes for you and your caregivers
  • Availability of new treatment options within our clinical trials program

Bio – Dr. Seth Rosen

Dr. Seth Rosen is a board certified colon and rectal surgeon. He’s an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at Emory University School of Medicine. As chair of Emory Healthcare’s Robotic Institute Committee, Dr. Rosen leads a team that is tracking utilization of robotic surgery throughout Emory Healthcare, including outcomes, quality, cost, and efficiency; identifying areas for improvement; and initiating plans based on its recommendations.

Dr. Rosen is a Fellow of The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and a current member of the Medical Association of Georgia.

He’s also a member of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

Cancer Support Groups at Emory Johns Creek

Cancer support groups provide patients and families a chance to meet with others who are experiencing similar life challenges and often share their concerns, fears and hopes. These groups are led by licensed social workers, registered nurses and other professionals.

Emory Johns Creek Hospital offers three cancer support groups to the community:

Johns Creek Women’s Cancer Support Group

Johns Creek Women’s Cancer Support Group meets the first Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. in Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s education center, on the lower level. These classes allow participants to meet face-to-face with fellow cancer patients and survivors. The sessions offer helpful coping skills and strategies to help patients through their experience. Attendees will also hear presentations by health, nutrition, fitness and legal experts. For more information, contact peggytitushall@gmail.com.

Colorectal Cancer Support Group

The Colorectal Cancer Support Group meets the 4th Tuesday of each month from 3 – 4:30 p.m. in the dining room at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, on the lower level. This group is designed to provide emotional support for patients going through treatment for colorectal cancer or those newly diagnosed and their caregivers. For more information, call Joy McCall, LCSW, OSW-C at 404-938-0918 or email her at joy.mccall@emoryhealthcare.org.

CLIMB – Children’s Lives Include Moments of Bravery

CLIMB is a 6-week children’s support group. The group is designed for children ages 6 – 11 years-old who have a parent or grandparent with a cancer diagnosis. Each week the group focuses on a different feeling and completes an art project to help children talk about those feelings. Registration is required for this group. CLIMB is a national program through the Children’s Treehouse Foundation. For more information, call Joy McCall, LCSW, OSW-C at 404-938-0918 or email her at joy.mccall@emoryhealthcare.org.

New Tests to Improve Decision Making in Prostate Cancer Treatment

This blog was originally posted June 3, 2015 AACR Press Office.

Prostate Cancer Cells

Prostate Cancer Cells

A diagnosis of prostate cancer can often result in difficult choices for both patients and physicians. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer diagnosed in American men, with over 200,000 diagnosed cases and almost 28,000 deaths per year. A major reason why prostate cancer is diagnosed so frequently is that the FDA-approved blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is widely used and is highly sensitive. However, the PSA test cannot distinguish prostate cancers that are aggressive from indolent cases that will not spread if left untreated.

It has been estimated that about 50 percent of men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer as a result of PSA testing would remain asymptomatic if left untreated. Furthermore, the side effects of surgery or radiation therapy can be significant, and include urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. These side effects from overtreatment without clear survival benefit led the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) to recommend against PSA screening. As a result, there is a pressing clinical need for new prostate cancer biomarkers that can discriminate aggressive from indolent disease to prevent overtreatment of indolent cases and undertreatment of aggressive cases. This is one example of how precision medicine can both improve cancer care and reduce overall health care expenditures.

While single biomarkers can be useful, quite often using a panel of many genes is more robust, predictive, and informative than a single biomarker such as PSA. Moreover, RNA is generally much easier to detect and quantitate than protein, even at low amounts, and RNA-based assays can test many targets simultaneously. RNA-based approaches to prostate cancer biomarker discovery include the analysis of which genes are switched on and off in a cancer cell, as well as measurement of previously unappreciated RNAs that do not code for proteins, and detection of known genetic mutations.

Biopsies themselves carry some risk of infection, discomfort, and expense. Consequently, less invasive biomarkers that can use blood or urine samples are more desirable, and likely to be adopted more broadly, resulting in better patient compliance and follow up. Many researchers are thus looking for prostate cancer biomarkers that can be readily measured from biofluid specimens.

There are several different clinical questions that new biofluid biomarkers for prostate cancer could potentially address. First, if I have a high PSA, do I really need a biopsy? Second, if my biopsy looks indolent, am I a good candidate for active surveillance, or do I really need surgery or radiation? And third, if I do need surgery or radiation, will it be curative, or should I think about enrolling in clinical trials? These are all important questions that many scientists and physicians are currently pursuing in their biomarker research.

Recent research in our lab has identified a gene panel that can predict whether a patient is likely to have a recurrence after surgery, and we are currently working on determining if this panel can also identify good candidates for active surveillance. This research is using advanced sequencing technologies on both urine and biopsy samples, and could make it easier for patients and their doctors to safely decide that surgery or radiation are unnecessary, reducing side effects and unnecessary treatments. A number of other commercially available panels are already in use including Prolaris, Oncotype Dx, and Decipher, though none are currently FDA approved. Hopefully, with additional research to determine the best biomarkers of cancer aggressiveness and approval of such tests, patients and physicians can be confident in the treatment decisions that they make, leading to the best possible health outcomes.

About Dr. Moreno

carolos moreno, phdCarlos S. Moreno, PhD, is an associate professor in the Departments of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, and Biomedical Informatics at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is a member of the Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics research program at Winship Cancer Institute. Moreno specializes in cancer bioinformatics and systems biology, cancer genomics, cancer biomarkers, and transcriptional networks. He is the informatics project leader for the Emory Molecular Interaction Center for Functional genomics (MicFG) as part of the Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD²) Network to identify protein-protein interaction networks.

Moreno has been a member of the American Association for Cancer Research since 2003 and received an AACR Minority Scholar Award in 2006.

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Massage Therapy Used to Combat Breast Cancer-Related Fatigue

cancer and massage therapyFatigue is the most common side effect of cancer treatment according to the National Cancer Institute. Many breast cancer survivors describe their fatigue as more intense than the feelings of being tired that we all experience from time to time. Reported characteristics include feeling tired, weak, worn-out, heavy, slow, or lack of energy and difficulty getting-up-and-going.

Currently, researchers from Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University are investigating the benefits of massage therapy on breast cancer survivors with extreme fatigue.

“We decided to look at massage therapy for cancer fatigue because cancer-related fatigue is one of the most prevalent and debilitating symptoms experienced by people with cancer,” explains Mark Rapaport, MD, principle investigator for this study. “Many studies investigating massage for patients with cancer have been focused on depression, anxiety or pain.”

“We already know that frequent massage can enhance the immune system and reduce anxiety, and it has been reported that massage therapy can stimulate energy, and reduce symptoms such as nausea and pain,” says Mylin Torres, MD, associate professor in Emory’s Department of Radiation Oncology, serves as a co-investigator on the study. “We believe that there are many positive effects to be gained by therapeutic massage and we hope to prove that, among other biological advantages, massage may diminish the incapacitation that cancer-related fatigue can cause for our patients.”

Participants in the six-week study are post-surgery breast cancer patients, between the ages of 18 and 65, who have been treated with standard chemotherapy, chemoprevention and/or radiation, and are suffering with breast cancer-related fatigue. They are broken into three groups.

  • Group one receives a typical Swedish-type massage
  • Group two does not receive a massage
  • Group three receives a light touch massage.

Throughout the clinical trial, participants’ vital signs are taken and blood drawn to check for immune markers. The study staff also regularly checks in with each participant to record any changes in their life or their health. So far, the findings are promising.

View this Fox21 news clip to learn more about recent findings from the cancer fatigue trial!

 

Related Resources:

Coping with Survivor’s Guilt After Cancer

cancer survivor guiltBeing diagnosed with cancer can bring on many different types of emotions from fear to sadness to relief; however, many patients don’t think about how they might feel after they complete their treatment. Many are surprised when they begin to feel guilty. This is known as survivor’s guilt. It is a feeling that is often experienced by those who have survived a major or traumatic event such as being diagnosed with cancer. The feelings may come from a sense of guilt that they survived the disease and another patient did not or they did well with treatment while another had a very difficult time recovering.

Here are some things to keep in mind if you think you might be suffering from survivor’s guilt:

  • You are not alone. Survivor’s guilt is very common. It is a natural response for many cancer patients. It often feels like sadness, depression or even grief.
  • Tell someone about how you’re feeling. Talk with a friend or family member you trust. You can always reach out to a social worker to help you process these feelings. Acknowledging those feelings can be help you process them and ultimately overcome them.
  • Consider keeping a journal. Sometimes it is helpful to write down how we are feeling in order to help us manage those emotions. Starting an art project is another creative way to cope with survivor’s guilt.
  • Remind yourself that every patient’s cancer journey is different and that’s okay. It is unrealistic to compare your treatment outcomes to someone else’s because everyone is different.
  • Be supportive. If you know someone who is going through treatment and having a difficult time, it is important to provide them with as much support as possible. As a cancer survivor, you offer a unique type of support because you have been there.
  • Attend a cancer survivor’s support group. Reaching out to other survivors can be helpful.

Don’t wait to get help if you think you are experiencing survivor guilt. It is important to acknowledge and address the issue sooner rather than later. Patients can talk directly to oncology social workers through the following community organizations: www.livestrong.org, www.cancer.org and www.cancercare.org.

About Joy McCall, LCSW

Joy McCallJoy McCall is a Winship social worker with bone marrow transplant, hematology and gynecologic teams and their patients. She started her professional career at Winship as an intern, working with breast, gynecologic, brain and melanoma cancer patients. She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Kennesaw State University and a Master of Social Work from the University of Georgia. As part of her education she completed an internship with the Marcus Institute working on the pediatric feeding unit, and an internship counseling individuals and couples at Families First, supporting families and children facing challenges to build strong family bonds and stability for their future. She had previously worked with individuals with developmental disabilities for over 4 years, providing support to families and caregivers.

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What is Radiation Therapy and How is it Used to Treat Cancer?

Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that is used to shrink tumors and stop the growth of cancer cells. High energy x-rays are aimed directly at cancerous cells or tumors. According to the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the technique is so effective in treating many different types of cancer that nearly two-thirds of all cancer patients will receive radiation therapy at some time during the course of their cancer treatment.

Depending on the type of cancer being treated, radiation may be used as a stand-alone treatment and often it is the only treatment needed. Or, it may be used in combination with surgery, chemotherapy and/or other targeted therapies. For example, doctors may use radiation therapy to shrink a tumor before surgery, or after surgery to stop the growth of any cancer cells that may be left behind.

Watch the video below to learn about the types of radiation treatments available to patients at Winship Cancer Institute:

Visit the new mobile-friendly Emory Radiation Oncology website to learn more about treatments and services offered in the Department of Radiation Oncology and what to expect as a new patient.

About Dr. Godette

Karen Godette, MDKaren Godette, MD, is a board certified radiation oncologist in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Godette practices general radiation oncology and specializes in breast and gynecological malignancies, prostate cancer and soft tissue sarcoma. Within these areas, her expertise is brachytherapy. Dr. Godette treats patients at Winship at Emory University Hospital Midtown where she has served as medical director since 2001.

Take Steps Now to Prevent Cancer

April CancerApril is Cancer Control Month. That means we need to find ways to reduce our risk of cancer as well as the chances that we’ll die from the disease. We have a tough job ahead. Before the year is over, nearly 1.7 million Americans will be newly diagnosed with cancer. It’s a sobering statistic and one that we can impact in a big way by taking steps now to help prevent the second leading cause of death in the United States.

If you’re a smoker, find a way quit. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, smoking cigarettes can cause cancer in almost any part of the body and is responsible for some of the most deadly types of the disease. As an oncologist, I would recommend that you stay away from all tobacco products and byproducts, including second hand smoke.

It is estimated that one in three Americans is now obese. Obesity is proven to be a major risk factor for breast, colon, esophageal and kidney cancers. It’s more important than ever that you maintain a healthy weight by eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Pay attention to portion size and cut down on alcohol consumption. While you’re at it, get off the couch and get some regular exercise. It will not only help you watch your weight, but studies show staying physically active can lower your risk of certain cancers.

As the summer months approach, be sure to protect your skin from the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation by wearing sunscreen with an SPF 30 or higher. Cover up or better yet, stay out of the sun during the peak hours of 10am to 2pm and stay away from tanning beds and sun lamps.

Finally, some cancers are hereditary. Know your family history of cancer and learn about the importance of early detection through screening. If you’re a woman at average risk for breast cancer, be sure to have a clinical breast exam and mammogram every year starting at age 40. Women ages 30-65 should also be screened every five years for cervical cancer. Colorectal cancer screening for women and men should begin in those 50 and older. Your health care provider can give you more information about the benefits of a colonoscopy.

For advice on locating cancer-screening opportunities, contact Emory Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse.

About Dr. Jillella

Anand Jillella, MDAnand Jillella, MD, is a national leader in bone marrow transplantation and has led the development of a strategy to decrease induction mortality for acute promyelocytic leukemia. He leads the efforts of the Winship Cancer Network and is expanding Winship’s role in bringing clinical and population-based cancer research to communities throughout Georgia and surrounding states.

Related Resources

Screenings Help Catch Head and Neck Cancers
“Top Secret” Cancer Facts Worth Sharing
Taking a Stand in Favor of E-Cigarette Regulation
Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle
Cancer Clinical Study Leads to Video Tool for Prostate Cancer Patients
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Screenings Help Catch Head and Neck Cancers

head and  neck cancer screeningsA recent study reported in JAMA Otolaryngology found that most Americans know little to nothing about head and neck cancers and could not name the most common symptoms and risk factors. This is a problem. If you wait months or even years to get a sore in your mouth or swelling in your neck checked by a doctor, you could be ignoring a sign of head and neck cancer that’s progressing. And, as with many other forms of cancer, the earlier a head and neck or oral cancer is diagnosed, the less invasive the treatment is and the higher the chance of cure. As a doctor who sees many patients with these cancers, one message comes through loud and clear: don’t ignore symptoms.

On April 17th, doctors and staff with Emory’s Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery will hold a free head and neck screening at Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUHM). This is a chance for patients who might be suffering any symptoms or have any of the stated risk factors for head and neck cancer, to have a simple, free exam. This involves a physical exam of the neck and inside the mouth, including the middle throat, soft palate, the base of the tongue, and the tonsils. As a best practice, Emory Healthcare suggests this screening procedure should also be a part of a routine dental visit.

Get a Free Head and Neck Screening on April 17th:

Emory University Hospital Midtown
Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery
9th Floor, suite 4400
550 Peachtree Street, NE
Atlanta, GA 30308

Date: 4/17/2015
Time: 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM

This is a first come – first serve walk in clinic. No Appointment Necessary.

For more information:
Phone: (404) 778-3381
Email: meryl.kaufman@emoryhealthcare.org

Important Information on Head and Neck Cancers:

Head and neck cancer involves skin or mucosal surfaces of the head and neck and includes cancers of the mouth, throat, nasal sinuses, skin of the head and neck and cancers of the major salivary glands. Head and neck cancers account for approximately 3% of cancers diagnosed every year in the United States and affect more than twice as many men as women.

Symptoms of head and neck cancer vary somewhat by site but often include non-healing ulcers in the mouth, unexplained loosening of the teeth, and pain that does not improve. Patients with cancers of the throat or salivary glands will often come in with a painless lump in the neck that does not resolve with antibiotics. Other patient will have ear pain or difficulty and/or pain when swallowing.

Potential Risk Factors for Head and Neck Cancer:

Head and neck cancer has historically been most associated with tobacco and alcohol abuse, and may also be associated with marijuana use. Recently, the human papilloma virus (HPV), a virus commonly passed during sexual activity, has been widely implicated in cancers of the tonsils and base of tongue. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HPV usually goes away by itself and does not cause health problems, but may be responsible for a growing number of oral cancers. Other risk factors include poor oral hygiene, radiation exposure, and Epstein-Barr Virus (Mononucleosis).

Every year, the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance promotes an awareness week in April that is highlighted by free head and neck cancer screenings all across the country. Our own free screening at EUHM is open to anyone in the community and we enthusiastically invite you to participate. We look forward to providing you with the opportunity to proactively advance your health on April 17!

About Dr. El-Deiry

Mark El-Deiry, MDMark W. El-Deiry, MD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, in the Emory University School of Medicine. He also serves as Chief of the Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, and Director of the Head and Neck Oncology Surgery Center. He is a member of the surgical team that specializes in treating patients with head and neck cancers including complex microvascular reconstructive surgery.

El-Deiry and the entire head and neck team are interested in promoting screenings that help detect head and neck cancers in early stages. His research interests include quality of life in head and neck cancer survivors and quality outcomes involved with treating patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer.

Related Resources

Takeaways from Dr. Saba’s Head and Neck Cancer Chat

HPV-Related Head and Neck Cancers on the Rise

HPV and Head and Neck Cancer Chat

With a Little Help from Friends

lex gilbert cancer survivorI always assumed that cancer would catch up with me one day. After all, my mother and two of my aunts had breast cancer so I figured I must be next in line. Yet it never occurred to me that the rectal bleeding I’d been experiencing could be colon cancer. Surely the sigmoidoscopy ordered by my doctor would lead me to a quick fix and that would be that. Surprise! When I woke up after the procedure, she came to my bedside and told me I had colon cancer.

When I heard those words I went numb. The world looked as it might if viewed through a funhouse mirror. I remember someone standing nearby handing me a box of Kleenex. I didn’t need the Kleenex. I didn’t cry until many weeks later and boy did I need Kleenex then. I think my soul just closed up shop so it could absorb the gravity of my situation at its own pace, and when it was ready to let go of the emotions, it let go.

Believe me, I am not one of those survivors who talk about what a gift it was to have cancer! I certainly would have preferred to learn the lessons taught by cancer in a less painful way, but all things being equal, there were important lessons learned and I think they are clearly worth passing along. Here’s one.

I pride myself on being self-sufficient and independent. One of the most difficult aspects of being a patient was accepting help from friends. When they offered, I’d say that we didn’t need anything even though that was utterly and completely false. Husbands come in handy sometimes and mine immediately jumped on my reluctance to let folks “in.” At the same time, a dear friend and colleague set up an on-line calendar where I could post what I needed and friends could sign up to help. I could ask for someone to buy me groceries on Wednesday, or help me get the house in order on Saturday, or mow the lawn, drive me to an appointment, or just plain keep me company.

The overwhelming response to the calendar and the ensuing discussions made me realize that when people offer help, they want to help! What a revelation! Too many of us deny our friends the satisfaction and fulfillment that helping someone in need gives them. Allowing folks to help also brings them into our lives in a deeper way, resulting in even more satisfying friendships. The Jedi mind-trick is that letting people help is a gift to them, as well as a gift to you.

About Lex Gilbert

Lex Gilbert is a cancer survivor and very active volunteer with Winship Cancer Institute. She originally comes from southern California, where she ran her own marketing and promotions company serving major corporate clients from throughout the U.S. She has been a life-long volunteer and was awarded “top volunteer” by the County of San Diego for her work mentoring a child in foster care. She moved to Atlanta in 2007 and now works in the Office of Health Promotion at Emory. She was awarded the CLASS Distinguished Service Honor in the Division of Campus Life. Bruce Gilbert, her husband of 32 years, is a musician fighting Parkinson’s disease and also volunteers at Winship as a pianist.

Related Resources

Colon Cancer Chat Transcript

An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part I: Risk Factors, Symptoms & Diagnosis

An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part II: Prevention, Diagnosis & Treatment

Winship Cancer Institute – Colon Cancer Resources

Find a primary physician through our Emory Healthcare Network or call Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse.

“Top Secret” Cancer Facts Worth Sharing

cancer secretsIt’s time to stop being embarrassed about the 3rd most commonly diagnosed cancer and the 3rd leading cause of cancer death for both men and women. More than 140,000 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year and nearly 50,000 will lose their battle to the disease according to The American Cancer Society.

It’s colon cancer awareness month – share the facts about how a colorectal cancer screening could save your life.

A study, published in JAMA Surgery and recently reported in the NYT, showed that incidences of colorectal cancer have been decreasing by about 1 percent a year since the mid 1980s. Simply said, more people under the recommended screening age of 50 are being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

Colon cancer is not embarrassing. There’s simply no sense in keeping secrets from your physician. If you have a history of colorectal cancer in your family or have particular symptoms that you’re unsure about then it’s time to get the facts from your doctor. Speak openly about your risk factors, prevention, early detection, and treatment.
Prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer are possible by appropriately scheduling a colorectal cancer screening. A conversation with your doctor is always confidential; make it honest and candid.

As a Nurse Practitioner in gastrointestinal cancers, I have had many patients who have stated that they wish they had gotten a colonoscopy as recommended for colorectal cancer screening. They also say they now preach to everyone they know to get their colonoscopies.

Find a primary physician through our Emory Healthcare Network or call Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse. No topic is top secret or off limits.

About Ms. Brutcher
Edith Brutcher

A chemotherapy infusion specialist and adult nurse practitioner, Ms. Brutcher’s clinical specialties include gastrointestinal and aerodigestive cancers. She has 27 years experience as a Registered Nurse, and 8 years as an Adult Nurse Practitioner with Medical Oncology. She obtained her Master of Science in Nursing Adult Practitioner, specializing in oncology and immunology, at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Related Resources

Colon Cancer Chat Transcript
An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part I: Risk Factors, Symptoms & Diagnosis
An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part II: Prevention, Diagnosis & Treatment
Winship Cancer Institute – Colon Cancer Resources