Prevention

“Top Secret” Cancer Facts Worth Sharing

cancer secretsIt’s time to stop being embarrassed about the 3rd most commonly diagnosed cancer and the 3rd leading cause of cancer death for both men and women. More than 140,000 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year and nearly 50,000 will lose their battle to the disease according to The American Cancer Society.

It’s colon cancer awareness month – share the facts about how a colorectal cancer screening could save your life.

A study, published in JAMA Surgery and recently reported in the NYT, showed that incidences of colorectal cancer have been decreasing by about 1 percent a year since the mid 1980s. Simply said, more people under the recommended screening age of 50 are being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

Colon cancer is not embarrassing. There’s simply no sense in keeping secrets from your physician. If you have a history of colorectal cancer in your family or have particular symptoms that you’re unsure about then it’s time to get the facts from your doctor. Speak openly about your risk factors, prevention, early detection, and treatment.
Prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer are possible by appropriately scheduling a colorectal cancer screening. A conversation with your doctor is always confidential; make it honest and candid.

As a Nurse Practitioner in gastrointestinal cancers, I have had many patients who have stated that they wish they had gotten a colonoscopy as recommended for colorectal cancer screening. They also say they now preach to everyone they know to get their colonoscopies.

Find a primary physician through our Emory Healthcare Network or call Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse. No topic is top secret or off limits.

About Ms. Brutcher
Edith Brutcher

A chemotherapy infusion specialist and adult nurse practitioner, Ms. Brutcher’s clinical specialties include gastrointestinal and aerodigestive cancers. She has 27 years experience as a Registered Nurse, and 8 years as an Adult Nurse Practitioner with Medical Oncology. She obtained her Master of Science in Nursing Adult Practitioner, specializing in oncology and immunology, at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Related Resources

Colon Cancer Chat Transcript
An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part I: Risk Factors, Symptoms & Diagnosis
An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part II: Prevention, Diagnosis & Treatment
Winship Cancer Institute – Colon Cancer Resources

Taking a Stand in Favor of E-Cigarette Regulation

e-cigarette regulationIt has taken us over 50 years of careful regulation with tremendous pushback to strip the tobacco companies of their ability to aggressively and falsely market cigarettes as safe products. The advent and popularity of e-cigarettes could wipe out much of that progress and endanger an entire generation of young people who are attracted to the slickly packaged cartridges, marketed to a youthful generation as a safe alternative to tobacco burning cigarettes.

I firmly believe that the United States Food and Drug Administration should have full authority to regulate e-cigarettes; the same full authority the agency currently has to regulate regular tobacco products. E-cigarettes are not made up of benign compounds. In fact, some of the ingredients such as formaldehyde are known carcinogens. With recent introductions of e-cigarettes from big tobacco companies such as Philip Morris, I believe they will pose some of the same risks as tobacco-burning projects unless they are regulated.

We know that nicotine is highly addictive, whether it is delivered from an e-cigarette, a regular cigarette or a patch. There is some data that nicotine may promote certain cancer signaling networks. There is also some very good evidence in young people that nicotine can cause the rewiring of the brain circuitry. Of greatest concern is recent data obtained from careful studies conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) that show that people who use e-cigarettes are twice as likely to consider smoking tobacco burning products. In my view, this makes e-cigarettes a Trojan Horse that allows tobacco products into the lives of young people without the proper FDA regulation.

The full range of health risks posed by e-cigarettes is unclear because they have not been fully studied. Just because we don’t have all the scientific evidence does not mean that e-cigarettes should get a free or easy ride. They should be held to the full high bar, especially because we don’t currently understand all of the dangers they pose.

My biggest concern about e-cigarettes is that they are easily marketed to teens and young adults. The campaigns seem to be working since e-cigarette use has almost tripled in the last three years. Only 19% of Americans are active cigarette smokers, but that’s still far too high in my book. We should be concerned as a society that smoking rates will increase as a result if e-cigarettes continue to be sold without any regulation. E-cigarettes are a step backward in our goals to move towards a tobacco free society.

About Dr. Khuri

Fadlo Khuri, MDFadlo R. Khuri, MD, deputy director of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Hematology & Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, and executive associate dean for research of Emory University, is a leading researcher and physician in the treatment of lung and head and neck cancers. He is Editor-in-Chief of the American Cancer Society’s peer-reviewed journal, Cancer.

Dr. Khuri’s contributions have been recognized by a number of national awards, including the prestigious 2013 Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award, given to an outstanding cancer researcher by the American Association for Cancer Research.

An accomplished molecular oncologist and translational thought leader, Dr. Khuri has conducted seminal research on oncolytic viral therapy, developed molecular-targeted therapeutic approaches for lung and head and neck tumors combining signal transduction inhibitors with chemotherapy, and has led major chemoprevention efforts in lung and head and neck cancers. Dr. Khuri’s clinical interests include thoracic and head and neck oncology. His research interests include development of molecular, prognostic, therapeutic, and chemopreventive approaches to improve the standard of care for patients with tobacco related cancers. His laboratory is investigating the mechanism of action of signal transduction inhibitors in lung and aerodigestive track cancers.

Related Resources

Bite Into a Healthy Lifestyle

Lung Cancer Progress Made, But We’re Not There Yet

CVS Stops Cigarette Sales

Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle

Eat Healthy with CancerThe Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recognizes March as National Nutrition Month. This year’s theme, “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle,” encourages everyone, including individuals undergoing cancer treatment, to adopt plans focused on making informed eating choices and getting daily exercise to improve overall health.

A healthy eating plan limits foods with added fats, sugars, and salt and emphasizes nutrient-rich foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, nuts and seeds. Nutritional needs should be met primarily through consuming food, not supplements, because whole foods provide a variety of other components that are considered beneficial to health. A healthy lifestyle is also more than just choosing to eat more fruits and vegetables. Age, gender, family history, and current health condition play a role in determining which foods we should eat more of and foods to avoid.

Understanding the nutritional content of foods is essential to making informed choices when building an eating plan. For example, dairy is not the only food group that contains calcium. Collard greens are also a good choice. Reading the Nutrition Facts Panel and the ingredient lists can be confusing, but it is a good way to determine nutritional content of food products.

Daily physical activity should go along with eating a healthy diet. Recommendations include at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity. Strength training exercises, such as lifting light weights and doing push ups, are also beneficial.

Here are some additional tips to help you “bite into a healthy lifestyle”:

  • Try one new food every week, instead of a complete diet overhaul.
  • Cook a new recipe or adapt an old one each week.
  • Fill half your plate with a variety of fruits and vegetables at every meal.
  • Try whole wheat, quinoa, brown rice, oats, barley.
  • Consume healthy lean protein sources.
  • Limit foods with added fats, sugars and salt.
  • Limit sweetened beverages.
  • Reduce foods that increase health risks.
  • Stay within your calorie needs when increasing healthier foods.
  • Eat a healthy balance between proteins, fruits, vegetables, fats and grains.

A registered dietitian can work with your preferences and routine to provide sound, easy-to-follow personalized nutrition advice to meet a lifestyle based eating plan.

Attend a cooking demonstration

Attend a cooking demonstration hosted by registered dietitian, Tiffany Barrett, on March 18th from 12:30pm until 1:30pm in the John H. Kauffman Auditorium at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University (1365-C Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322).

About Tiffany Barrett

Tifffany BarrettTiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and sought after expert in her field. She is a key contributor to support programs at Winship and provides personalized nutritional advice to Winship Cancer Institute patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. She also consults with patients who have completed treatment and wish to continue to build a strong and healthy diet. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Florida State University and a Master of Science at University of North Florida. Tiffany is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management.

Related Resources

Takeaways from Dr. Cohen’s “Advancements in Breast Imaging” Live Chat

Thank you to everyone who joined us for last week’s live web chat on “Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection.” Dr. Michael Cohen, director, Division of Breast Imaging for Emory’s Department of Radiology, discussed the latest in breast imaging screening and technology.

Questions varied from ,“What are the current breast screening guidelines?” to “What is tomosynthesis and when is it the right choice for screening?” Below are just a few of the questions and answers from the chat. Make sure to view the chat transcript for the whole discussion.

Question: What are the current breast cancer screening guidelines?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
Women aged 40 and younger should have a clinical breast exam at least every 3 years. All women aged 40 and over should get a yearly screening mammogram, clinical breast exam and perform a monthly breast self-examination.

 

Question:
When is breast tomosynthesis the right choice for screening? And how does tomosynthesis compare to an MRI in diagnosing cancer?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
Digital Tomosynthesis (3D mammography) is an improvement on traditional 2D mammography. Rather than the traditional single view of a breast in 2D mammography, 3D mammography obtains a series of very thin 1 mm sections of the breast. This allows us to look at the breast as if we were viewing pages of a book and gives a much more accurate look inside. If tomosynthesis is available at your breast imaging facility, it is an excellent way to screen.

Studies have shown that 3D mammography permits detections of more cancers, while at the same time reducing the number of unnecessary call-backs to evaluate lesions that are not cancer. This is a win-win for the patient. MRI screening is reserved for a limited number of patients at high risk.

Question:
What about the radiation exposure for these types of test [tomosynthesis]; is it different from traditional mammograms?

Michael Cohen, MDAnswer:
With current technology, a patient receives both a 2D and a 3D mammogram at the same time. The addition of 3D about doubles the radiation exposure compared to 2D alone, but is still within FDA guidelines for mammography.

Also, some very exciting technology is on the horizon that will permit us to create a 2D mammogram from a 3D mammogram using sophisticated computers. When that becomes available, we will only need to do a 3D mammogram, thereby reducing the radiation exposure to the original level.

If you missed this informative chat with Dr. Cohen, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript.

If you have any questions for Dr. Cohen, don’t hesitate to leave a comment in our comments area below!

Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection

Advancements in Breast Imaging ChatBreast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). October is Breast Cancer Awareness month and the breast care specialists across Emory Healthcare want you to know the importance of screening and early detection.

The American Cancer Society recommends that women (without breast cancer symptoms), age 40 and older should have a mammogram every year as long as they are in good health. Getting yearly screening mammograms increases the chance of detecting cancers in the early stages, before they start to cause symptoms. By detecting cancer early, screening exams also help increase the chance of survival and lower the risk of mortality.

At Emory Healthcare, we are proud to offer patients with leading breast screening techniques, including the latest in breast imaging technology, called tomosynthesis, or 3D mammography.

Learn more about breast screening guidelines and advancements in breast imaging by joining us on Tuesday, October 21 at 12:00 pm EST for a live web chat on “Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection.” Dr. Michael Cohen, Director, Division of Breast Imaging for Emory’s Department of Radiology, will be available to answer questions such as: what is the latest in breast imaging technology? When should I start getting screened? To register for the chat, click here.

Also, during October, the Emory Breast Imaging Centers are offering extended and weekend hours for women needing a screening mammogram. Dates and details are below:

Extended Hours: Thursday, October 9, Tuesday, October 21, Thrusday October 23; 7:30 a.m – 7:00 p.m. at the Emory Breast Imaging Center on Clifton Road.

Saturday Hours: October 18, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Emory University Hospital Midtown.

Registration: To schedule an appointment, call 404-778-PINK (7465). Standard rates apply.

Chat Details:

Date: Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Time: 12:00- 1:00 pm EST
Chat Leader: Dr. Michael Cohen
Chat Topic: Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection

Chat Sign Up

Takeaways from Dr. Saba’s Head and Neck Cancer Chat

Thanks to everyone who joined us on Tuesday, June 24, for our live online chat on “Risk factors, symptoms and treatment options for head and neck cancer” led by Nabil Saba, MD, Chief of Head and Neck Oncology at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), head and neck cancers account for approximately three percent of all cancers in the U.S. During the chat, Dr. Saba addressed some of your questions relating to risk factors, symptoms and the latest research for head and neck cancer. See all of Dr. Saba’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What are the symptoms of head and neck cancer? How do I know if I need to go get checked out?

Nabil Saba, MDDr. Saba: Symptoms include having a lump in the neck, persistent changes in your voice over time, difficulty swallowing, and unusual pain in the neck/throat area (pain that doesn’t seem to get better with time). These are some common symptoms, so if you’re experiencing any of these, it would probably be a good idea to talk to your physician.

 

Question: Are there particular factors or traits that may pre-dispose a person to head or neck cancers?

Nabil Saba, MDDr. Saba: There are certain well-defined risk factors for head and neck cancer, including a history of smoking or alcohol consumption. It has also been observed that HPV-related oropharynx cancer is increasing in Caucasian males, whereas oral tongue cancer seems to be increasing in Caucasian females. While there is an increased risk of head and neck cancer in these groups of people, it doesn’t necessarily mean you are at high risk if you fall into one of these groups.
 
If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. You can also visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/cancer for more information on cancer treatment at Winship at Emory.

Take Steps to Prevent Skin Cancer

Skin ExamI am a dermatologist in the Emory Clinic and my focus is medical dermatology with a monthly melanoma clinic. I see patients of all skin types but a large part of my practice is seeing patients for total body skin exams (TBSE). We recommend that patients with all skin types get a total body skin exam, but patients who have a family history of melanoma, atypical mole syndrome or non-melanoma skin cancer should be particularly proactive about scheduling their skin checks. As a broad rule, once a year skin checks should suffice. These checks become more frequent in patients who have a personal history of melanoma or non-melanoma skin cancer.

A skin exam entails wearing a gown at the dermatologist’s office and getting all parts of your skin looked at for moles that may appear abnormal or growths that may be non-melanoma skin cancers such as basal cell skin cancer or squamous cell skin cancer. If we see anything suspicious, the spot is biopsied, which involves removing a small sample of skin tissue. It takes five minutes or less to perform a biopsy and the results are usually available in a few days.

During this visit, we educate patients to be good about self-examination. I recommend that patients pick the first of every month and put it on their calendar to examine their skin head to toe. They should look for any changing moles or any new bumps that may have come up. It can be difficult to know what to worry about or not, but in general a melanoma can show up as a new mole or a changing or bleeding mole. A basal or squamous cell generally presents as a new bump or flat lesion that can bleed, or hurt, or just be new and growing. If you are worried about something, you should make an appointment to be checked by your dermatologist right away.

Sun protection is a big part of preventing skin cancers. The AAD (American Academy of Dermatology) recommends everyone use sunscreen that is broad spectrum (protects against UVA and UVB), has a sun-protection factor (SPF) of 30 or greater and is water resistant. And you need to apply an adequate amount of sunscreen for it to be effective: generally one ounce (enough to fill a shot glass) for the exposed parts of your body for each application. This needs to be repeated every 2 hours on continued sun exposure. Remember to apply sunscreen at least 15 minutes before going outdoors.

You can use any type of sunscreen that works for you, such as lotions, creams, gels, sticks or even sprays. Sprays, though, have the disadvantage of accidental inhalation and it’s sometimes hard to know when using a spray if you have applied an adequate amount.

Tanning bed use has been proven to increase the risk of melanoma and also accelerate photo-aging. It should be avoided at all cost. Sunbathing and a history of blistering sunburns also increase your risk of skin cancer. It is very important to avoid the sun between 10 am and 2 pm, when the rays are the strongest, and to use additional protective clothing such as long sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses.

As you get ready for fun summer weekends, here’s a checklist to help you prevent skin cancer: avoid the sun when it’s at its strongest, use sunscreen and protective clothing any time you are out in the sun, never use a tanning bed, and when in doubt, check it out! Schedule an appointment with a dermatologist along with your annual physical visit, and for accurate information about safe sun practices, check the AAD website.

About Dr. Bhandarkar

Sulochana Bhandarkar, MDSulochana Bhandarkar, MD, is an assistant professor of dermatology at the Emory School of Medicine. She completed her medical school education from her home country, India, at Kasturba Medical College in Mangalore, where she also did a three-year dermatology residency with a special interest in vitiligo, a condition affecting skin pigmentation. After moving to the U.S., she did a clinical research fellowship at the University of California San Francisco, as well as a melanoma research fellowship at Emory University. She did her residency in dermatology at Emory University and became a faculty member at Emory in 2011. Her clinical interests are vitiligo and melanoma.

Related Resources

 

Growing Hope Together!

Mary BrookhartI was diagnosed with breast cancer at the young age of 33. A cancer diagnosis always comes as a shock, but it’s particularly unexpected at that age. Because my mother had breast cancer at a young age, a new provider sent me for my base line screening mammogram and that turned out to be my first and only mammogram. I can say without a doubt that a mammogram saved my life.

I was treated here at Winship, by Dr. Toncred Styblo and Dr. David Lawson. Twenty-five years later, all three of us are still here. I came back to Winship six years ago, but not as a patient. I took a job as supervisor of business operations for the Glenn Family Breast Center at Winship, and I am one of the organizers of the Celebration of Living event coming up this Sat., June 21.

That’s why the Celebration of Living event is so near and dear to my heart. This is a chance to get together with other survivors, and discover that part of being a survivor is learning that it’s ok to let fun and humor back into your life. Learn to let the fear go and not let it rule your life. Coming to the Celebration of Living event can be a first step toward getting back out into the world, or it can be a continuation of your on-going journey. We all know that battling cancer has very dark moments, but I hope we can bring some hope and lightness into your life.

So I invite all cancer survivors, their family members and friends to come share this special day. There will be workshops for the mind, body and soul, as well as music, food and companionship. It’s free and open to all. Detailed information is available on our website.

I see more and more people surviving cancer because of new and better treatments and earlier detection. In the time since I got my screening mammogram, the technology has greatly improved. Emory and Winship are now offering state-of-the-art 3D mammograms (also called tomosynthesis) at no additional charge above the cost of standard mammograms, so that all women can benefit from this more precise screening technology. For more information about this new service and where it’s available, check out this video about 3D mammography at Emory Healthcare.

For some, the idea of living a normal lifespan with cancer as a chronic disease is a reality.

My hope is that one day, all cancer patients will enjoy a lifetime of survivorship.

Mary Brookhart,
Cancer Survivor

About Mary Brookhart

Mary Brookhart grew up in Ohio before moving to Georgia to get away from the snow. There she enjoyed a 20+ year career in advertising and design. In 2008, looking for something more rewarding, Mary returned to Winship, this time, not as a patient, but as supervisor of business operations for the Emory Glenn Family Breast Center. Besides serving as an advocate for breast cancer patients, Mary coordinates screenings for mammograms and the Emory’s Breast Cancer Seminar for the Newly Diagnosed breast cancer patient. She currently lives in rural Conyers, with her husband of 37 years, and their three horses.

3D Mammography: More Detail in Imaging Can Reduce Call-Backs

According to the American Cancer Society, about 10 percent of women who have mammograms will be called back for additional testing. However, only 8-10 percent of those women will need a biopsy, and 80 percent of the biopsies will turn out to be benign.

While that sounds encouraging, the emotional toll of a call-back can increase a woman’s anxiety about having future mammograms. To help reduce call backs and false positives, three hospitals in the Emory Healthcare system now use an advanced breast imaging technology, called 3D mammography, which provides radiologists with a much more detailed view of a patient’s breast tissue.

Watch CNN’s segment about Ivory Poser’s experience and how Emory Healthcare is using 3D mammography at three of its hospitals to help reduce call-backs and false positives.

“Compared with 2D mammography, a 3D exam allows radiologists to view the breast in small slices providing more detailed pictures of specific areas,” says Michael A. Cohen, MD, director of Breast Imaging for Emory Healthcare. “The state of the art technology is proven to reduce call-backs by 20 to 40 percent and finds more cancers, particularly in women with dense breast tissue.”

In addition, Emory offers this FDA-approved mammography technology, which is typically not covered by insurance, at no additional charge above the cost of a traditional 2D digital mammogram for patients getting their annual screening mammogram.

“Breast tomosynthesis is a real game changer in the early detection of breast cancer,” explains Leonel A. Vasquez, MD, director of Community Radiology and chief of service for Emory Johns Creek Hospital. “The fact that we are offering this advanced technology at no additional cost is both a real value and the best care for our patients.”

The advantages of 3D mammography are:

  • Greater chance for cancer detection
  • Reduction in false-positives
  • Reduction in call-backs (especially for women with dense breasts)
  • Better visualization and confidence for physicians
  • Less anxiety for patients

Mammogram screenings have been shown to detect breast cancer in earlier stages, which can lead to better chances for a cure. According to the American Cancer Society, deaths related to breast cancer have been declining since 1990, partly due to early detection through screenings and advanced treatments. Screening mammograms are recommended for all women at average risk for breast cancer starting at age 40.

3D mammography is currently available at Emory’s breast imaging centers at the Winship Cancer Institute on Emory’s Clifton Campus, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

Emory Breast Imaging Center located at
Emory University Hospital Midtown
550 Peachtree Street NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30308

To make an appointment: 404-778-7465

Emory Breast Imaging Center located at
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University
1365 Clifton Road NE
Building C, 1st Floor
Atlanta, Georgia 30322

To make an appointment: 404-778-7465

Center for Breast Care located at
Emory Johns Creek Hospital
Emory Physicians Plaza
6335 Hospital Parkway, Suite 106
Johns Creek, GA 30097

To make an appointment: 678-474-7465

Related Resources

4 Ways Men Can Lower Their Risk of Cancer

Family ManOne out of every two men in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in our lives. It’s a sobering statistic to consider as we head into Father’s Day weekend. Beyond skin cancer, men are most frequently diagnosed with prostate, lung or colorectal cancer. Those are also the three malignancies responsible for the highest number of deaths in men.

Reducing your risk of cancer is more important than ever. Here are four ways to make an impact today.

  1. If you use any tobacco products, quit now. Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than a dozen types of cancer including those involving our lungs, bladder, and mouth. Chewing tobacco and snuff can also cause head and neck, esophageal, stomach or pancreatic cancer. Talk with your doctor about the best ways to help you kick the habit for good. Finding a support group can also make a big difference in whether you succeed.
  2. Cut back on alcohol consumption. Heavy drinking can cause health problems, but did you also know that alcohol can increase your risk for cancers of the mouth, throat, liver and colon? Even worse: drinking and smoking at the same time. It is recommended that men consume no more than two alcoholic drinks a day. In case you were wondering, one drink contains 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor.
  3. Listen to your wife or partner and get a checkup. Starting at the age of 50, men at average risk for colorectal cancer should have a colonoscopy. If no polyps are found, the test should be repeated every 10 years. Your doctor may recommend a fecal occult blood test at an earlier age. Also at 50, talk with your doctor about the pros and cons of getting a PSA test to screen for prostate cancer. If you are considered to be in a high-risk group, your doctor may recommend that you be tested earlier.
  4. Get off the couch and get some exercise. You’ve heard it before, but as a doctor, I can tell you that regular physical activity is one of the best ways to control your weight, reduce stress and lower your risk of cancer. Try to get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise each week or 75 minutes of vigorous workouts.

As you get ready to celebrate Father’s Day, put down that cigarette and beer, get outside and grab a tennis racket, a soccer ball or even a Frisbee. Also don’t forget to wear sunscreen…at least with a SPF of 30! Have a great Father’s Day!!!

About Dr. Curran

Walter Curran, MDWalter J. Curran, Jr., MD was appointed Executive Director of Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University in 2009. He joined Emory in January 2008, as the Lawrence W. Davis Professor and Chairman of Emory’s Department of Radiation Oncology. He also serves as Group Chairman and Principal Investigator of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), a National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative group, a position he has held since 1997. Curran has been named a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and Chair in Cancer Research as well as a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scholar.

Dr. Curran has been a principal investigator on over thirty National Cancer Institute-supported grants and is considered an international expert in the management of patients with locally advanced lung cancer and malignant brain tumors. He has led several landmark clinical and translational trials in both areas and is responsible for defining a universally adopted staging system for patients with malignant glioma and for leading the randomized trial which defined the best therapeutic approach to patients with locally advanced lung cancer. He serves as the Founding Secretary/Treasurer of the Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups and is a Board Member of the Georgia Center for Oncology Research and Education (Georgia CORE). Dr. Curran is the only radiation oncologist to have ever served as Director of a National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Center.

Dr. Curran is a Fellow in the American College of Radiology and has been awarded honorary memberships in the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology. According to the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research, Dr. Curran ranked among the top ten principal investigators in terms of National Cancer Institute grant awards in 2013, and was first among investigators in Georgia, and first among cancer center directors.