Nutrition

Foods that Fight Prostate Cancer

prostate healthy eatingEating a healthy diet helps reduce your chances of getting cancer, but which foods should men eat to reduce their prostate cancer risks and why? See our list of cancer-fighting foods below to find out.

1. Tomatoes

Tomatoes are packed with lycopene; a member of the carotenoid family found commonly in red pigmented fruit and vegetables, lycopene has been established as having strong antioxidant properties. Research suggests that lycopene is a preventive agent for prostate disease. [1]

2. Watermelon

Watermelon, like tomatoes, is loaded with lycopene. In fact, one cup has the lycopene content of two tomatoes. But watermelon is also rich in vitamin C and beta-carotene, antioxidants that help to protect cells from damage and rid your body of harmful cells that can lead to cancer.

3. Garlic

Garlic is famed for its supposed health benefits, and studies concerning its anti-cancer benefits look promising. Several compounds are involved in garlic’s possible anticancer effects – garlic contains allyl sulfur and other compounds that slow or prevent the growth of tumor cells. In one study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute in 2002, scientists discovered that men who ate about a clove of garlic daily had a 50 percent reduced risk of developing prostate cancer. [2]

4. Green tea

Green tea contains polyphenol compounds, particularly catechins, which are antioxidants and whose biological activities may be relevant to cancer prevention. Studies have shown that green tea and its components effectively mitigate cellular damage due to oxidative stress, and green tea extract is reported to induce cancer cell death and starve tumors by curbing the growth of new blood vessels that feed them. [3]

5. Soy

Soy fills the body with isoflavones — compounds that act like the hormone estrogen in humans — and have been found to have an abundance of anti-cancer benefits. Studies have shown that the isoflavones in soy inhibit prostate cancer cell growth, induce cellular death, and enhance the ability of radiation to kill prostate cancer cells. [4]

6. Beans

Beans are a good source of protein a good alternative to meat. Beans are high in fiber

7. Broccoli

Studies suggest a link between cruciferous vegetables and prostate cancer risk.A member of the cruciferous vegetables and contains phytochemical sulforaphane that targets cancer cells.

8. Fish

Have a healthier balance of Omega-3 and omega 6 fatty acids may help prevent the development of prostate cancer. Eat fish found in cold waters to increase omega-3 intake. Salmon, Herring, Mackerel, Trout, Sardines.

Sources:
[1] Ilic D., “Lycopene for the prevention and treatment of prostate disease.”
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24531784
[2] Milner JA. “A historical perspective on garlic and cancer.” J Nutr. 2001 Mar;131(3s):1027S-31S.
[3] Butt MS, Sultant MT. “Green tea: nature’s defense against malignancies.”
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19399671
[4] Mahmoud AM, Yang W, Bosland MC., Soy isoflavones and prostate cancer: A review of molecular mechanisms.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24373791

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About Tiffany Barrett

tiffanybarrettTiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and sought after expert in her field. She is a key contributor to support programs at Winship and provides personalized nutritional advice to Winship Cancer Institute patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. She also consults with patients who have completed treatment and wish to continue to build a strong and healthy diet. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Florida State University and a Master of Science at University of North Florida. Tiffany is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management.

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Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle

Eat Healthy with CancerThe Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recognizes March as National Nutrition Month. This year’s theme, “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle,” encourages everyone, including individuals undergoing cancer treatment, to adopt plans focused on making informed eating choices and getting daily exercise to improve overall health.

A healthy eating plan limits foods with added fats, sugars, and salt and emphasizes nutrient-rich foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, nuts and seeds. Nutritional needs should be met primarily through consuming food, not supplements, because whole foods provide a variety of other components that are considered beneficial to health. A healthy lifestyle is also more than just choosing to eat more fruits and vegetables. Age, gender, family history, and current health condition play a role in determining which foods we should eat more of and foods to avoid.

Understanding the nutritional content of foods is essential to making informed choices when building an eating plan. For example, dairy is not the only food group that contains calcium. Collard greens are also a good choice. Reading the Nutrition Facts Panel and the ingredient lists can be confusing, but it is a good way to determine nutritional content of food products.

Daily physical activity should go along with eating a healthy diet. Recommendations include at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity. Strength training exercises, such as lifting light weights and doing push ups, are also beneficial.

Here are some additional tips to help you “bite into a healthy lifestyle”:

  • Try one new food every week, instead of a complete diet overhaul.
  • Cook a new recipe or adapt an old one each week.
  • Fill half your plate with a variety of fruits and vegetables at every meal.
  • Try whole wheat, quinoa, brown rice, oats, barley.
  • Consume healthy lean protein sources.
  • Limit foods with added fats, sugars and salt.
  • Limit sweetened beverages.
  • Reduce foods that increase health risks.
  • Stay within your calorie needs when increasing healthier foods.
  • Eat a healthy balance between proteins, fruits, vegetables, fats and grains.

A registered dietitian can work with your preferences and routine to provide sound, easy-to-follow personalized nutrition advice to meet a lifestyle based eating plan.

Attend a cooking demonstration

Attend a cooking demonstration hosted by registered dietitian, Tiffany Barrett, on March 18th from 12:30pm until 1:30pm in the John H. Kauffman Auditorium at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University (1365-C Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322).

About Tiffany Barrett

Tifffany BarrettTiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and sought after expert in her field. She is a key contributor to support programs at Winship and provides personalized nutritional advice to Winship Cancer Institute patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. She also consults with patients who have completed treatment and wish to continue to build a strong and healthy diet. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Florida State University and a Master of Science at University of North Florida. Tiffany is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management.

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Enjoy Holiday Food without Regret

Eating Thanksgiving with CancerEating healthy during the holidays can be a challenge for most of us, but for many cancer patients it’s a struggle just to eat. If you’re currently going through cancer treatment, eating might not be the first thing on your mind. However, staying nourished during treatment is extremely important. Your body needs more nutrients than normal to repair the effects of treatment.

We are all well aware that holiday foods tend to be fatty and sugary with many strong flavors. If you are having symptoms such as nausea, low appetite, taste changes or pain with swallowing, many of the traditional holiday foods will be unsettling. Avoid heavy cream sauces or gravies if you have a sensitive stomach. Also, stay out of the room where food is being cooked because cooking smells can make you nauseous. Turkey breast, cranberry sauce, potatoes, and basic vegetable dishes should be well tolerated. Whole grains like brown rice, barley and quinoa make excellent side dishes. Eat lots of fruits or veggies without buttery sauces or other fats. Let friends and family know how you feel and what dishes you can tolerate. Eat small portions and see how you handle the food, then go back for larger portions. Don’t overdo it.

If you are in cancer treatment, you may have a weakened immune system and you will need to be extra careful about foodborne illness and food safety. The primary cause of foodborne illness is eating perishable foods that have been held longer than two hours at room temperature. Keep hot foods at 140F or higher and cold foods at 40F or lower, out of the “danger zone.” Discard any turkey, stuffing, gravy or other items left out longer than two hours. Do not wait to refrigerate leftover foods; place immediately in a shallow container and pop them in the fridge. Keep turkey and dressing no longer than three days in the refrigerator, or freeze them. If you have any doubt about whether raw vegetables have been washed, skip them or your bring your own.

During this season of parties and social gatherings, many struggle to balance holiday indulgences with a healthy lifestyle. Weeks of eating foods high in sugar and fat, and limited amounts of fruits and vegetables, can start the New Year off with unwanted extra pounds. For rich seasonal treats, focus on small portions: a bite size piece of chocolate, a small handful of party nuts, slivers of pumpkin pie. Studies show that the first few bites of a food taste the best.

Limit high calorie, sugary beverages and get creative with plain water by making your own infused water. My favorite combination is mint with cucumber slices, refrigerated for at least 4 hours. But you can mix any fruit and herb variety. Include some of these healthy foods into your holiday diet: green and orange fruits and vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, berries, wild legumes, almonds and brazil nuts, and ginger.

The holidays are a special time, but for those in cancer treatment, there’s also anxiety. With careful planning and preparation, you can create an enjoyable holiday season.

About Tiffany Barrett

Tifffany BarrettTiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, Clinical Dietitian Specialist, provides personalized nutritional advice to Winship at Emory patients who are undergoing cancer treatment. Ms. Barrett also consults with patients who have completed treatment and wish to continue to build a strong and healthy diet. She earned her Bachelor of Science at Florida State University and a Master of Science at University of North Florida. Tiffany is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management.

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A Heart-Healthy Diet Also Helps Prevent Cancer

Heart Healthy Diet Helps Prevent CancerA good diet is about fueling your body, eating real food and limiting processed foods. Good nutrition plays a crucial role in our well-being by helping maintain a healthy weight, and improving our immune system to prevent disease. In fact, nutrition guidelines for cancer prevention are similar to those for preventing other diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.

What do I mean by “real food”? Although some people have a stricter definition of it, I think a realistic goal is to eat foods that are as close as possible to their natural state, such as whole grains instead of processed white flour. Avoid packaged foods with a long list of unfamiliar ingredients. As a registered dietitian, I recommend eating plenty of fruits, vegetables and legumes like beans. Select a variety of whole foods naturally rich in nutrients. Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, and brussel sprouts are particularly good to eat as are tomatoes, berries, beets, peppers, apples, squash, pumpkin, and sweet potatoes.

Strive for two thirds of your plate to consist of plant-based foods including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, seeds, and nuts. The remaining one third of each plate should consist of lean high-protein foods such as fish, tofu, beans, or lean meats. No single food is the perfect one for cancer prevention, but a combination of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals can offer good protection according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR).

Make better choices when including fat in your diet. Consume monounsaturated fats, avoid saturated and trans fats. Monounsaturated fats (plant based) include olives, olive oil, canola and avocados. Polyunsaturated fats include omega-3 fatty acids and have an anti-inflammatory and blood thinning effect. Good sources are salmon, herring, sardines, mackerel, walnuts and flax.

Avoiding foods that are bad for your heart can also help reduce cancer risk. Stay away from foods that are salted, cured, processed or smoked. Instead, choose lean animal products including chicken, fish, turkey and red meat cuts such as sirloin or loin. Limit refined carbohydrates and sweetened drinks. Both increase chances of being overweight and offer little nutritional value. Most of the sodium in our diets comes from processed foods rather than salt we add as a seasoning. Read food labels to learn exactly how much sodium is in a product. Everyone should reduce their sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium a day (about 1 teaspoon of salt).

The way in which you prepare your food can also make a difference in your overall health. Baking, broiling, microwaving, and poaching are preferable to grilling, frying, and charbroiling. If you enjoy the flavor of foods off the grill, try baking or broiling them first then put them on the grill briefly before serving.
Fueling your body with real food, limiting processed foods and beverages, and getting regular exercise will go a long way toward preventing cancer and heart disease, the top two causes of death in the United States.

Author: Tiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LD, Nutrition Specialist, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Tiffany Barrett, MS, RD, CSO, LDAbout Tiffany Barrett
Tiffany is a Certified Specialist in Oncology Nutrition and completed a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management. At Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, her role is to provide nutrition assessments and education for oncology patients and families during and after treatment. Tiffany graduated from Florida State University with Bachelor of Science and completed a dietetic internship at the University of North Florida combined with a Master of Science.

 

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Foods That Fight Breast Cancer For You!

Nutrition to Fight CancerOur experts at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University cannot stress enough the importance of incorporating a healthy diet and exercise plan into everyday life, not only for cancer and disease prevention, but also maintenance to prevent recurrence after treatment.

Winship oncology nutritionist, Tiffany Barrett, recently sat down with CNN to discuss foods that help in the fight against cancer, no matter what stage. Some key advice: include a variety of colorful fruits and veggies, eat whole grains, fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids and soy in moderation.

Check out the video below to hear the full version of Tiffany’s discussion on breast cancer fighting foods.

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