Events

Winship’s Win the Fight 5K Exceeds Fundraising Goal to Help Battle Cancer

Winship Win the Fight 5K RecapThis past weekend,  Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University raised a record amount of money towards cancer research in Georgia. Fundraising support, through the 4th annual Winship Win the Fight 5K, which was held on Saturday, September 27, 2014, surpassed its half-million dollar goal and brought in more than $582,000. Over three thousand runners and walkers gathered Saturday morning to participate in the event that started and ended on the Emory campus and wound its way through the surrounding Druid Hills-area.

“We are so grateful to all the supporters who joined us at this year’s Winship 5K,” says Walter J. Curran, Jr., MD, executive director of Winship. “The money raised will support more than a dozen cancer research projects at Winship and will lead us to more and more success stories in our fight against cancer.”

The Winship Win the Fight 5K is a unique event because it allows participants to select the specific area(s) of cancer research they want their tax-deductible donations to benefit. Donations are still being accepted until November 14, 2014. For more information, visit the Winship Win the Fight 5K website.

And make sure to mark your calendars for the 5th annual Winship Win the Fight 5K, which will be held on Saturday, October 3, 2015.

Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection

Advancements in Breast Imaging ChatBreast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). October is Breast Cancer Awareness month and the breast care specialists across Emory Healthcare want you to know the importance of screening and early detection.

The American Cancer Society recommends that women (without breast cancer symptoms), age 40 and older should have a mammogram every year as long as they are in good health. Getting yearly screening mammograms increases the chance of detecting cancers in the early stages, before they start to cause symptoms. By detecting cancer early, screening exams also help increase the chance of survival and lower the risk of mortality.

At Emory Healthcare, we are proud to offer patients with leading breast screening techniques, including the latest in breast imaging technology, called tomosynthesis, or 3D mammography.

Learn more about breast screening guidelines and advancements in breast imaging by joining us on Tuesday, October 21 at 12:00 pm EST for a live web chat on “Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection.” Dr. Michael Cohen, Director, Division of Breast Imaging for Emory’s Department of Radiology, will be available to answer questions such as: what is the latest in breast imaging technology? When should I start getting screened? To register for the chat, click here.

Also, during October, the Emory Breast Imaging Centers are offering extended and weekend hours for women needing a screening mammogram. Dates and details are below:

Extended Hours: Thursday, October 9, Tuesday, October 21, Thrusday October 23; 7:30 a.m – 7:00 p.m. at the Emory Breast Imaging Center on Clifton Road.

Saturday Hours: October 18, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Emory University Hospital Midtown.

Registration: To schedule an appointment, call 404-778-PINK (7465). Standard rates apply.

Chat Details:

Date: Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Time: 12:00- 1:00 pm EST
Chat Leader: Dr. Michael Cohen
Chat Topic: Advancements in Imaging for Early Breast Cancer Detection

Chat Sign Up

Winship Win the Fight 5K

Winship Fight 5KThe Winship Win the Fight 5K is this Saturday, September 27, 2014 and already a HALF A MILLION DOLLARS has been raised towards cancer research at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

There’s still time to be a part of this special event! Today is the last day to register online for Saturday’s event. If you cannot be present to run or walk this weekend, register as a “Sleep-In Warrior” to support cancer research from wherever you will be this weekend.

For more information, or to register, visit the Winship Win the Fight 5K website. Also, check out this inspiring video below featuring WSB-TV’s Mark Winne’s wife, Kate, a cancer survivor and Winship patient. Mark and Kate’s story not only shows the crucial role cancer research plays in the continuous fight for a world without cancer, but also the hope it beings to patients and families, here and now.

Related Resources:

Cancer Researchers, Patients Support Winship 5K Side-by-Side
Why I Run: To Raise Awareness & Funding For My Dad’s Cancer
Running to Carry Forth a Father’s Passion to Make a Difference…

Growing Hope Together!

Mary BrookhartI was diagnosed with breast cancer at the young age of 33. A cancer diagnosis always comes as a shock, but it’s particularly unexpected at that age. Because my mother had breast cancer at a young age, a new provider sent me for my base line screening mammogram and that turned out to be my first and only mammogram. I can say without a doubt that a mammogram saved my life.

I was treated here at Winship, by Dr. Toncred Styblo and Dr. David Lawson. Twenty-five years later, all three of us are still here. I came back to Winship six years ago, but not as a patient. I took a job as supervisor of business operations for the Glenn Family Breast Center at Winship, and I am one of the organizers of the Celebration of Living event coming up this Sat., June 21.

That’s why the Celebration of Living event is so near and dear to my heart. This is a chance to get together with other survivors, and discover that part of being a survivor is learning that it’s ok to let fun and humor back into your life. Learn to let the fear go and not let it rule your life. Coming to the Celebration of Living event can be a first step toward getting back out into the world, or it can be a continuation of your on-going journey. We all know that battling cancer has very dark moments, but I hope we can bring some hope and lightness into your life.

So I invite all cancer survivors, their family members and friends to come share this special day. There will be workshops for the mind, body and soul, as well as music, food and companionship. It’s free and open to all. Detailed information is available on our website.

I see more and more people surviving cancer because of new and better treatments and earlier detection. In the time since I got my screening mammogram, the technology has greatly improved. Emory and Winship are now offering state-of-the-art 3D mammograms (also called tomosynthesis) at no additional charge above the cost of standard mammograms, so that all women can benefit from this more precise screening technology. For more information about this new service and where it’s available, check out this video about 3D mammography at Emory Healthcare.

For some, the idea of living a normal lifespan with cancer as a chronic disease is a reality.

My hope is that one day, all cancer patients will enjoy a lifetime of survivorship.

Mary Brookhart,
Cancer Survivor

About Mary Brookhart

Mary Brookhart grew up in Ohio before moving to Georgia to get away from the snow. There she enjoyed a 20+ year career in advertising and design. In 2008, looking for something more rewarding, Mary returned to Winship, this time, not as a patient, but as supervisor of business operations for the Emory Glenn Family Breast Center. Besides serving as an advocate for breast cancer patients, Mary coordinates screenings for mammograms and the Emory’s Breast Cancer Seminar for the Newly Diagnosed breast cancer patient. She currently lives in rural Conyers, with her husband of 37 years, and their three horses.

Risk Factors and Symptoms of Head and Neck Cancer

Head and Neck Cancer ChatHead and neck cancer includes a collective group of cancers occurring in the head or neck region, ranging from the nasal cavity and sinuses, to the back of the throat, including the oral cavity, tonsils, base of the tongue, nasopharynx, hypopharynx and larynx.

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), head and neck cancers account for approximately three percent of all cancers in the U.S. Studies show that these cancers are more common in people over the age of 50 and three times more common in men than in women; however, if diagnosed early, head and neck cancer is often curable.

Recently, a growing number of cancers occurring in the base of the tongue and tonsils have been linked to human papillomavirus (HPV), which is already a well known risk factor for cervical cancer in women. HPV-related head and neck cancer is a distinct type of cancer and so far has been diagnosed more in men than women.

Join Nabil Saba, MD, Chief of Head and Neck Oncology at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, as he hosts a live chat on “Risk Factors, Symptoms and Treatment Options for Head and Neck Cancer.” Dr. Saba will be available to answer all of your questions such as:

  • What are the known risk factors linked to head and neck cancer?
  • What are the symptoms of head and neck cancer?
  • How is head and neck cancer diagnosed?
  • Can head and neck cancer be prevented?

Chat Details:

Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Time: 12:30- 1:30 pm EST
Chat Leader: Dr. Nabil Saba
Chat Topic: Risk Factors, Symptoms and Treatment Options for Head and Neck Cancer

Chat Sign Up

Local Firefighter Stomps Out Head and Neck Cancer: Get Screened on April 25!

While the human papillomavirus (HPV) is most commonly known as a risk factor for cervical cancer in women, it is also a growing risk factor for head and neck cancers in men. According to the American Cancer Society, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers (tongue, tonsils, oropharynx, gums and other parts of the mouth) occur more than twice as often among men as they do among women. Tobacco and alcohol use are still the most common risk factors for all head and neck cancers, but recent studies from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that 60 to 70 percent of cancers in the throat and base on the tongue may be linked to HPV.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) states that head and neck cancers account for approximately three percent of all cancers in the U.S. Head and neck cancer includes cancers that occur in the head or neck region, ranging from the nasal cavity and sinuses, to the back of the throat, including the tonsils and base of the tongue.

In this FOX 5 video, meet Frank Summers, a local Atlanta-area firefighter who sought treatment at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, after his startling diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancer.

 

Free Head & Neck Cancer Screening

Want to get screened? Emory’s Department of Otolaryngology (Ear, Nose and Throat) will hold a FREE head and neck cancer screening tomorrow, Friday, April 25, 2014 at Emory University Hospital Midtown. The screening will be held from 8am to 12pm at the address below. Walk-ins are welcome!

Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery
Emory University Hospital Midtown
Medical Office Tower (MOT), 9th Floor, Suite 9400
550 Peachtree Street NE
Atlanta, GA 30308

Related Resources

How We’re Working to Cure Multiple Myeloma

Over the past ten years, I have seen the treatment of multiple myeloma dramatically improve because of new drug therapies that have come out of clinical trials. I am now leading a clinical study to learn more about the genetic components of multiple myeloma and how we can use that knowledge to come up with better, more targeted drugs and individualized therapies for patients. I think this landmark study will lead to treatments that effect long-term remission, or even cure, from the cancer.

In the CoMMpass study, launched by the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, we will follow 1,000 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma over the course of eight years. We will study the genomic changes in their disease while they receive frontline treatments, and continue studying those changes through remission stages or relapse. One of the questions we hope to answer is why some patients do well on a specific drug, while others do not and may need multiple drugs to keep their myeloma from advancing.

The first step in the study is mapping out the molecular characterization of a patient’s tumor using sequencing at the time of initial diagnosis, and then following what happens in the sequencing information during and after treatment. If the disease comes back, we want to know if there were changes in the disease or new mutations that were influenced by the therapy or by the original mutations themselves?

As we learn more about cancer and its various types, we do less lumping them together and more splitting them into individual diseases. Lymphoma is a good example. It used to be that the disease was characterized as six or seven different types, and now we know there are at least 50 different variations of lymphoma. We look at the molecular characterization of lymphoma and create subtypes that are potentially treated in different ways. We may need to do that in myeloma. In the CoMMpass study, we will be able to have individual tumor specimens molecularly sequenced, which has never been done before, and we will learn much more about the cancer and its number of subtypes.

We are also looking at the impact of side effects on quality of life issues in this trial. There may be molecular characteristics of a patient’s tumor that can tell us whether that patient will have side effects from a specific treatment, so mapping a patient’s molecular subtype might influence the type of drugs he gets.

We have seen the life expectancy of multiple myeloma patients double in the last ten years. I think that there are probably some patients we are curing now and I believe that CoMMpass will help us to identify the best drugs and the best targets to increase the cure rate in this disease. We hope this study will help push the barrier to cure even further, but do it in a way that does not compromise a patient’s quality of life.

To learn more, watch this video as Dr. Lonial further explains Multiple Myeloma and treatment options for the diease.

Multiple Myeloma Online Chat

Multiple Myeloma Chat Sign UpWant to learn more about multiple myeloma? Join expert physician, Jonathan Kaufman, MD, for a live web chat on March 11, 2014 at 12:00 PM EST. Dr. Kaufman will be there to answers all your questions about known risks, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma. Bring your questions and prepare for a great discussion!

Multiple Myeloma Chat Sign Up

About Dr. Sagar Lonial

Dr. Sagar LonialDr. Lonial is Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs for the Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, and Director of the Translational Research for the B-Cell Malignancy Program. He is also a professor in the Emory University School of Medicine.

Dr. Lonial’s research focuses on combination therapy in B-cell malignancies focusing on myeloma. He is a trained bone marrow transplant physician with an interest in molecular therapy for lymphoma and myeloma. His clinical interests include evaluating the combination of new molecular targeted agents for B-cell tumors as well as target discovery and validation.

Dr. Lonial has authored or coauthored over 200 publications and recently was awarded the Celgene ‘Young Investigator’ Award, the MMRF ‘Top 15 Innovator’ Award, and the MMRC ‘Center of the Year’ award.

He earned his medical degree from the University Of Louisville School Of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, followed by a fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Related Links
Understanding Multiple Myeloma
Phase I Trials – Where All Anticancer Drugs Begin

 

Understanding Multiple Myeloma

While still a relatively uncommon cancer, multiple myeloma has recently received attention surrounding the diagnosis of popular news reporter, Tom Brokaw. This year, an estimated 24,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with multiple myeloma, and there are about 77,600 people now living with this blood cancer.

About Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a type of cancer that forms because of a disorder in the plasma cells, which live in the bone marrow and are the producers of antibodies. These antibodies are what provide protection from infections after vaccination, but in myeloma, the plasma cells become malignant and grow out of control, crowding out the normal bone marrow.

When plasma cells grow uncontrolled by the normal immune system, the consequences can include:

  • Anemia, a condition caused by low red blood cell counts due to crowding in the bone marrow.
  • Bone lesions, as myeloma cells like to create “holes” in the bones.
  • Kidney problems, because the antibodies produced by the plasma cells can clog up the kidneys.
  • Elevated blood calcium level, typically as a consequence of the bone issues.

Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

The most common symptoms for patients are typically fatigue, weakness, bone pain, anemia, or frequent unexplained infections. Multiple myeloma affects both men and women but is more common in men and there is a higher occurrence of multiple myeloma among African Americans than among Caucasians.  It is a disease typically seen in patients who are older than age 65, although it occurs in African-American patients about ten years earlier, and it affects a fair number of younger patients.

Multiple Myeloma Treatment

Treatment for patients with multiple myeloma has changed dramatically over the past decade. As we have developed more effective drugs to target the plasma cells, we also have significantly improved overall survival. Fifteen years ago, the average survival was 3 to 4 years, whereas the average survival is now over 7 years, and for many patients, expected survival is more than 10 years.

The keys to this improvement in overall survival are related to several factors. First, we have better tools to combat myeloma. There have been 6 new drugs approved for treating myeloma over the past decade, and these agents are more effective at treating the disease than the standard mixtures of chemotherapy we had before. The second factor that has improved survival for certain patients is the use of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, in which the patient’s own stem cells are given back to the patient’s body after receiving high-dose chemotherapy. Finally, we now have a better understanding of the biological changes that occur in a myeloma cell and this is helping us to better target treatment needed among these patients.

As we discover new tools and expand the options available for treating multiple myeloma, we see encouraging advancements in both survival and quality of life for these patients. The multidisciplinary treatment team at Winship at Emory has been recognized as a national and international leader in both transplant and non-transplant based approaches to treatment therapies, patient outcomes and clinical trials.

Multiple Myeloma Online Chat

Multiple Myeloma Chat Sign UpWant to learn more about multiple myeloma? Join expert physician, Jonathan Kaufman, MD, for a live web chat on March 11, 2014 at 12:00 PM EST. Dr. Kaufman will be there to answers all your questions about known risks, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma. Bring your questions and prepare for a great discussion!

Multiple Myeloma Chat Sign Up

About Dr. Sagar Lonial

Dr. Sagar LonialDr. Lonial is Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs for the Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, and Director of the Translational Research for the B-Cell Malignancy Program. He is also a professor in the Emory University School of Medicine.

Dr. Lonial’s research focuses on combination therapy in B-cell malignancies focusing on myeloma. He is a trained bone marrow transplant physician with an interest in molecular therapy for lymphoma and myeloma. His clinical interests include evaluating the combination of new molecular targeted agents for B-cell tumors as well as target discovery and validation.

Dr. Lonial has authored or coauthored over 200 publications and recently was awarded the Celgene ‘Young Investigator’ Award, the MMRF ‘Top 15 Innovator’ Award, and the MMRC ‘Center of the Year’ award.

He earned his medical degree from the University Of Louisville School Of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, followed by a fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.

Running to Carry Forth a Father’s Passion to Make a Difference…

The Winship Win the Fight 5K brings together runners and supporters who participate for a wide variety of reasons. Some run to raise awareness for the importance of cancer funding and research, while others participate to honor the legacy of loved ones who are either currently in the fight against cancer, or those who have lost the battle.

Charles Stevens with daughters

Chandra Stephens-Albright & Charlita Stephens-Walker with their father, Charles.

For Chandra Stephens-Albright and Charlita Stephens-Walker, this weekend’s race is extremely important as the sisters prepare to run for a very special person, their father, Charles R. Stephens. “His name was Charles, his legacy is never giving up, and his leadership was, and remains, in raising funds to do good,” said Chandra about her father who passed away from complications of pancreatic cancer in February 2013.

Charles spent his professional career as a fundraising leader, serving in senior development positions at many educational institutions including his alma mater, Morehouse College. Other places of work included Dillard University, Clark College, Clark Atlanta University, Indiana University Center on Philanthropy and The Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta. He also served as the national campaign director for the United Negro College Fund (UNCF).

But Charles’s impact goes far beyond the institutions and organizations for which he served his professional time raising funds. Today, his legacy extends nationally to the individuals who shared his passion for fundraising. As the first African American Chair of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), a prestigious and international fundraising association, Charles dedicated his life to changing the fundraising industry from the inside out.

A passage from the AFP’s tribute to Charles following his passing captures it all: “Charles’s lifetime passion was to merge philanthropy and diversity (which he saw as nearly the same ideas) and introduce people of diverse backgrounds to the profession he calls ‘inclusive, noble, and worthwhile.’ His efforts changed the way the fundraising community looks at diversity, brought countless women and minorities into the profession and earned him the AFP Chair’s Award for Outstanding Service, an honor that has been granted to less than 20 people since it was instituted in 1982.”

The Chair’s Award was given to Charles during the AFP’s national conference in 2011, which was shortly after Charles had been diagnosed with cancer. Chandra and Charlita accompanied their father to the conference in Chicago, where they learned for the first time the full scope of Charles’s impact on the entire fundraising profession.

“He was a rock star, but to us he had never said so,” said Chandra, a 1985 Emory College alumna. She adds, “My sister and I did not really understand his national contribution until this cancer came along. It is this that establishes the groundwork for our Winship 5K team name – Charles’ Legacy Leaders.”

During his battle with cancer, Charles continued to live life fully by not only continuing to work at his passion, but by taking special vacations and spending quality time with his family, friends and peers.

“I can’t do justice to my father’s spirit with words,” Chandra said. “Not only did he undergo multiple rounds of chemo, but he did so while maintaining his positive spirit and his irrepressible sense of humor. We had two fantastic years to spend with him – years we didn’t think we’d have – in large part due to the fantastic care he got from the team at Winship.”

At the Winship 5K, there is no shortage of inspirational stories like Charles’s to be found. Incredible people like the Stephen sisters are joining in the fight against cancer to honor those who have gone before and made an impact on the world. If you would like to donate to the Winship 5K, contribute to the Charles Legacy Leaders team, or sign-up for the race yourself, please visit our Winship 5K website for more information.

Related Resources:

Brain Tumor Patient Embraces Life – One Step at a Time

Brain Tumor Patient Story

Dr. Costas Hadjipanayis and Jennifer Giliberto at the Southeastern Brain Tumor Foundation’s 2011 Race for Research.

In 2007, Jennifer Giliberto received the news that would change her and her young family’s life. She was diagnosed with a brain tumor — a grade II astrocytoma. Jennifer had a choice – let the brain tumor put her on the sidelines or continue to embrace life. She and her family chose the latter. Since her diagnosis, Jennifer has become a board member for the Southeastern Brain Tumor Foundation (SBTF) and currently serves as board Vice President. She also is a top fundraiser for their annual Race for Research which is slated for Saturday, September 21 at Atlantic Station.

Emory University Hospital Midtown’s chief of neurosurgery and Jennifer’s own surgeon, Costas Hadjipanayis, MD, PhD, says that the SBTF often is a lifeline for patients and their families. Dr. Hadjipanayis also serves as president of the SBTF.

“The Race for Research brings together patients, their families and their friends to raise awareness and funds for brain tumor research,” says Hadjipanayis. “It’s not only a fun event, but it also helps fund grants for brain tumor research at leading medical research centers throughout the southeast like Emory.”

Learn more about Jennifer’s inspiring story by watching the CNN video below:

Related Resources: