colon cancer

Coping with Colorectal Cancer: A Parent’s Perspective

naomi ziva unicorn costumeAccording to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and women. Parents and guardians are never fully prepared to hear news that their child has a life-threatening illness like colorectal cancer.

Diagnosis

Hal and Miriam Schmerer know this situation all too well as their daughter, Naomi Ziva, was diagnosed with Stage 4 colorectal cancer at the age of 43.

“Naomi has always been an independent go-getter, so when she was diagnosed with colorectal cancer, it was hard for her to give up some of that independence and come back home,” says Hal Schmerer.

In 2016, Naomi was on a family vacation in Europe when she started having serious abdominal pain. When she arrived back to the U.S., her parents say she drove herself to the emergency room where doctors diagnosed her with Stage 4 colorectal cancer. The cancer spread from her colon to her liver, lungs, and partially to her spine.

Treatment

naomi ziva grinch costumeAfter being diagnosed, Naomi was determined that if she had to undergo chemotherapy she was going to try to take the drudgery out of it and insert some fun. Naomi was known at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University in Johns Creek for dressing up in costumes with her friend Jennifer at every infusion appointment. Her family says she wanted to bring some joy to others fighting cancer.

Hal says his daughter’s positivity helped draw in other patients and momentarily take their mind off of the pain they were experiencing.

“We heard that a patient told one of the nurses to schedule them for chemo whenever the ‘woman who wears the costumes’ comes, too,” says Miriam Schmerer.

Naomi’s family says they’re thankful for the care from physicians, like Winship medical oncologist Bassel El Rayes, MD, and the nurses at Winship who helped her get through some very dark days.

During one hospital stay, Naomi suffered incredible pain from chemotherapy affecting her kidneys.

“She was unable to get more pain medicine for a while because of her condition,” says Hal. “One of the Winship nurses, Alex Howze, sat with her while we went to get dinner, he held her hand and talked with her until she felt better.”

After a hard-fought battle with cancer, Naomi passed away in March 2018. Her family credits the staff at Winship, the community, and their family and friends for constant support during this devastating time.

Support

“Our neighbors were generous enough to raise $6,000 for Naomi’s medical expenses,” says Hal. “We’re so thankful for our synagogue, neighbors and Naomi’s friends who helped support us by cooking meals, organizing her belongings and spending time with us.”

Naomi’s parents offer advice below for parents or caregivers of adults fighting cancer:

  • Never give up hope.
  • Prepare to deal with high and low points, including challenges of insurance companies and bad days your child will experience.
  • Try to reduce your own anxiety and depression.
  • Take care of yourself; eat right and get your rest.
  • Find a support group of other parents and caregivers.
  • Offer guidance and wisdom, but allow your child to make their own health care decisions.
  • Find a way to continue your child’s legacy.

Naomi’s parents compiled all of her photos, blogs and poetry about her cancer journey into a book called Waiting for the Next Blue Sky. They say this project helped them cope but also keep their daughter’s spirit alive.

“I want the world to remember that Naomi loved to encourage others,” says Hal. “Cancer didn’t define her; it gave her a new outlook and understanding on life to cherish each moment.”

Learn More

Talk to your primary care physician about your risk of colorectal cancer and to determine if you should schedule a colonoscopy. At Winship Cancer Institute, we’re committed to advancing the standard of care for all our patients, including those diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer. Learn more about our colorectal cancer treatment program or schedule an appointment with our gastrointestinal specialists by calling (404) 778-1900.

Talk to Our Nurses

Emory HealthConnection is where registered nurses can help you find a location or specialist that’s right for you. Call 404-778-7777 from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST (M-F).

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Seeing over 17,000 patients a year, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is Georgia’s only National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center and serves as the coordinating center for cancer research, education and care throughout Emory University.

 

Colon Cancer Screening Options

colon cancer screening testsColon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States for both men and women. Fortunately, the death rate is in decline, in large part due to an increase in preventive screening.

Colon cancer screening is one of the most effective early detection and prevention services available in medicine today. By identifying and removing tumors in the colon early on, small cancers, as well as pre-cancerous lesions that have a risk of turning into cancer, can be eliminated.

Risk Factors

There are certain factors that put people at an increased risk of colon cancer. Family history is one. People who are most at risk are persons who have a first degree family member—mother, father, brother, sister—who’s had colon cancer.

People who have Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis or other specific diseases of the colon may also be at risk of developing colon cancer.

Behavioral risk factors come into play as well. Being obese, not engaging in physical activity, and having a low-fiber, low plant-based diet all contribute to an increased risk of colon cancer.

Ease of Screening

The importance of cancer screening cannot be overstated. Colon cancer is uniquely easy to screen for, for two important reasons.

First, colon cancer is a very slow progressing cancer. It takes a very long time for colon cancer to grow. It can even take a couple of decades. This makes it possible to catch it early and to also go longer between screenings.

Second, colon cancer screening is actually identifying cancer and pre-cancerous lesions that are technically outside of the body. It’s not like having to do a breast biopsy for breast cancer or screening for lung cancer where you actually have to go into people’s chests. You can actually find out what’s going on along the lining of the colon and stop progression before disease enters the body tissues.

Two Major Screening Options

There are two primary approaches to screening for colon cancer, and which method is used will determine the frequency of screening.

One approach is where the actual anatomy or structure of the colon is evaluated. This method is accomplished either through X-ray testing or a colonoscopy. The colonoscopy is the most advanced and thorough option and only needs to be done once every ten years.

The other approach involves obtaining stool and looking to see if there is any blood or evidence of cancer components. This method of testing must be done as frequently as every year to every three years, depending on the specific test.

Get Screened—It Could Save Your Life

Know your risk factors, discuss them with your doctor, and get screened. For the average American, the recommendations are to begin screening around age 50. Frequency of testing depends upon what test is used.

Most hospital facilities have set up efficient systems for getting people screened, and again, it’s the type of thing you can discuss with your doctor about what options are available.

Click here to listen to a podcast about colon cancer screening with Dr. Matthew McKenna, Director of the Division of Preventive Medicine in the Department of Family and Preventative Medicine at Emory Healthcare.

 

Learn More

Talk to your primary care physician about your risk of colorectal cancer and to determine if you should schedule a colonoscopy. At Winship Cancer Institute, we’re committed to advancing the standard of care for all our patients, including those diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer. Learn more about our colorectal cancer treatment program or schedule an appointment with our gastrointestinal specialists by calling (404) 778-1900.

Talk to Our Nurses

Emory HealthConnection is where registered nurses can help you find a location or specialist that’s right for you. Call 404-778-7777 from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST (M-F).

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Seeing over 17,000 patients a year, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is Georgia’s only National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center and serves as the coordinating center for cancer research, education and care throughout Emory University.

 

About Dr. McKenna

Matthew McKenna, MDMatthew T. McKenna, MD, is the director of Emory University’s Division of Preventive Medicine, and also serves as professor of Medicine in Emory’s Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. He has extensive experience in public health and preventive medicine. From 1989 – 2010, he worked for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and before joining the Emory faculty he was the medical director for the Fulton County (the county where the city of Atlanta is located) Department of Health and Wellness from 2010 to 2015. Dr. McKenna is a graduate of the Emory University School of Medicine and he completed his residency in Family Medicine and a post-doctoral fellowship in epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh.

Dr. McKenna joined CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service Program in 1989 and completed the CDC residency in General Preventive Medicine and Public Health in 1992. He subsequently assumed positions of increasing responsibility throughout his career working in a wide range of areas, such as cancer control, tuberculosis, HIV and his last position at CDC was as the director of the Office on Smoking and Health. He is board certified in Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Dr. McKenna serves as a volunteer, expert consultant to the Guideline Development Group of the American Cancer Society. That group provided input to the creation of the Colorectal Cancer Screening guidelines that were issued by the Society in May of 2018.

Get the Facts About Colonoscopies

ColonoscopyColorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the United States, accounting for roughly 50,000 deaths each year. In 2018 alone more than 140,000 individuals were diagnosed, according to the American Cancer Society.

Fortunately, there’s a safe and effective way to identify precancerous cells and prevent colorectal cancer: the colonoscopy. Research continues to show the clear impact this screening has on saving lives. One recent study found that, among men and women with an average risk of colorectal cancer, colonoscopies reduced the risk of death from colon or rectal cancer by 67 percent.

Still, despite this evidence, many of us are hesitant to schedule our regular screening. Some of us think of the procedure as uncomfortable or embarrassing, or we may want to avoid the seemingly unpleasant prep to clear our intestines. But the more we know the more we’ll understand the push towards these important screenings. Discover the truth about colonoscopies, and why you should schedule a screening today.

Who Needs a Colonoscopy?

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that all adults begin colorectal screenings at age 50 and continue with screenings through age 75. Based on the findings of your results, you may not need to return for another colonoscopy for 5-10 years.

Colonoscopies are not the only screening option to detect colorectal cancer, but it is the most effective. Your primary care provider will discuss screening options, including which is the best for you.

What Should I Expect During a Colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy allows your doctor to see the entire length of your rectum and colon to look for and remove abnormal growths or polyps. You’ll be asked to prepare for the procedure before it’s scheduled. This preparation includes:

  • Emptying the bowels by drinking a prescribed laxative and using enemas
  • Following a liquid-only diet for 24 hours before the procedure

Right before the procedure, you’ll receive sedation to help you relax and go to sleep. Then, your doctor will insert a colonoscope (a flexible, lighted tube with a small video camera on the end) slowly into your rectum and colon. If any polyps or growths are found, your doctor can remove them immediately.

What Are the Symptoms of Colorectal Cancer?

A colonoscopy can identify colorectal cancer before symptoms appear, which improves treatment and outcomes. Common symptoms of colorectal cancer include:

  • Bloating or feeling full
  • Change in bowel habits, including
    • Diarrhea or constipation
    • Feeling as though bowel does not empty completely
    • Blood in stool
    • Stool that is narrower than usual
  • Feeling very tired all the time
  • Frequent gas pains or cramps
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Weight loss

It’s important to note that these symptoms may not necessarily be a result of colorectal cancer. Other health problems can produce similar symptoms, which is why it’s important to contact your physician if you’re experiencing any of these symptoms.

What Are the Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer?

The main risk factors for colorectal cancer are uncontrollable. They include heredity, family history and personal medical history. Other risk factors include:

  • Diabetes
  • Other controllable factors
    • Alcohol consumption
    • Obesity
    • Processed meat consumption
    • Red meat consumption
    • Smoking
  • Presence of an inflammatory bowel disease (i.e., Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, etc.)

Remember, early detection is your best chance for a cure. You should contact your physician if you’re experiencing symptoms or are at risk for colorectal cancer. If your physician feels it’s appropriate, a screening test such as a colonoscopy may be recommended to rule out the possibility of cancer.

Learn More

Talk to your primary care physician about your risk of colorectal cancer and to determine if you should schedule a colonoscopy. At Winship Cancer Institute, we’re committed to advancing the standard of care for all our patients, including those diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer. Learn more about our colorectal cancer treatment program or schedule an appointment with our gastrointestinal specialists by calling (404) 778-1900.

Talk to Our Nurses

Emory HealthConnection is where registered nurses can help you find a location or specialist that’s right for you. Call 404-778-7777 from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST (M-F).

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Seeing over 17,000 patients a year, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is Georgia’s only National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center and serves as the coordinating center for cancer research, education and care throughout Emory University.

 

About Dr. McKenna

Matthew McKenna, MDMatthew T. McKenna, MD, is the director of Emory University’s Division of Preventive Medicine, and also serves as professor of Medicine in Emory’s Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. He has extensive experience in public health and preventive medicine. From 1989 – 2010, he worked for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and before joining the Emory faculty he was the medical director for the Fulton County (the county where the city of Atlanta is located) Department of Health and Wellness from 2010 to 2015.Dr. McKenna is a graduate of the Emory University School of Medicine and he completed his residency in Family Medicine and a post-doctoral fellowship in epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh.

Dr. McKenna joined CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service Program in 1989 and completed the CDC residency in General Preventive Medicine and Public Health in 1992. He subsequently assumed positions of increasing responsibility throughout his career working in a wide range of areas, such as cancer control, tuberculosis, HIV and his last position at CDC was as the director of the Office on Smoking and Health. He is board certified in Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Dr. McKenna serves as a volunteer, expert consultant to the Guideline Development Group of the American Cancer Society. That group provided input to the creation of the Colorectal Cancer Screening guidelines that were issued by the Society in May of 2018.

Colorectal Cancer Awareness

Dr. Seth Rosen Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in both men and women in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates there will be 95,520 new cases of colon cancer and 39,910 new cases of rectal cancer in 2017.

What is Colorectal Cancer?

Most colorectal cancers start as a growth, called a polyp, in the inner lining of the colon or rectum and slowly progresses through the other layers. Removing a noncancerous polyp early can keep it from becoming a cancerous tumor, which is why screening is such an important tool for preventing this disease.

Colorectal Cancer Symptoms

Colorectal cancer doesn’t always cause symptoms. It’s important to get screened regularly.

If you do have symptoms, they may include:

  • Stomach pain, aches, or cramps that don’t go away
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Blood in stool
  • Unintended weight loss

If you develop symptoms, it’s important to talk to your doctor immediately.

Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors

Your risk for developing colorectal cancer increases as you get older. Younger adults can get colorectal cancer, but more than 90% of cases occur in people who are 50 years old or older.

Other risk factors include:

  • Inflammatory bowel diseases
  • Personal or Family History of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps
  • Tobacco use
  • Heavy alcohol use
  • Your racial and ethnic background
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Lack of regular physical activity
  • A diet low in fruits and vegetables
  • A low-fiber and high-fat diet
  • Overweight and obesity

Colorectal Cancer Screenings

Several tests are used to detect colorectal cancers, one of the most commonly used tests is a colonoscopy. During this test, the doctor uses a colonoscope (a thin tube with a small video camera on the end) to look at the entire length of the colon and rectum. Special instruments can be passed through the colonoscope to biopsy or remove any suspicious-looking polyps.

Other tests include:

  • Double-contrast barium enema (DCBE)
  • CT colonography (virtual colonoscopy)
  • Guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT)
  • Fecal immunochemical test (FIT)
  • Stool DNA test

When should I get screened? 

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that adults age 50 to 75 get screened for colorectal cancer. Adults age 76 to 85 should ask their doctor if they should be tested. However, you may need to get screened earlier than 50 if you meet certain risk factors.

If you believe you are at an increased risk for colorectal cancer, talk with your doctor to determine how often you should be tested and what screening is right for you.

Colorectal Cancer Treatments

There are many ways to treat colorectal cancer depending on its type and stage.

  • Some treatments may include local therapies such as: surgery, radiation therapy, ablation or embolization
    • These treatments are often used for earlier stage cancers
  • Systematic treatments including chemotherapy and targeted therapy may be used because they can reach cancer cells anywhere in the body

Next Steps

If you have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer, please call 404-778-1900 or 888-946-7447 to make an appointment or request an appointment online.

Winship Cancer Care

Your Winship multidisciplinary care team includes oncology surgeons, colorectal surgeons, radiologists, pathologists, pharmacists, nutritionists, social workers and advanced practice nurses with expertise in colorectal and gastrointestinal cancers. The benefits of our multidisciplinary and highly experienced teams include:

  • Access to doctors and surgeons who rank among the top colorectal cancer experts in the world
  • Weekly review of patient cases by the full team of experts
  • Coordinated scheduling for appointments among various specialties
  • Access to a nurse navigator to assist you throughout the treatment process
  • Access to support groups and education classes for you and your caregivers
  • Availability of new treatment options within our clinical trials program

Bio – Dr. Seth Rosen

Dr. Seth Rosen is a board certified colon and rectal surgeon. He’s an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at Emory University School of Medicine. As chair of Emory Healthcare’s Robotic Institute Committee, Dr. Rosen leads a team that is tracking utilization of robotic surgery throughout Emory Healthcare, including outcomes, quality, cost, and efficiency; identifying areas for improvement; and initiating plans based on its recommendations.

Dr. Rosen is a Fellow of The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and a current member of the Medical Association of Georgia.

He’s also a member of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

Takeaways from the Colorectal Cancer Live Chat at Winship

colorectal-chat-emailThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, March 8th for the live online colorectal cancer program chat at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University hosted by Drs. Bassel El-Rayes & Seth Rosen.

Drs. El-Rayes & Rosen answered several of your questions about colorectal cancer risk factors, symptoms and therapy. The colorectal cancer program at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University offers multidisciplinary teams including oncology surgeons, radiologists, medical oncologists, pathologists, and advanced practice nurses with expertise in colorectal cancer and other gastrointestinal cancers. There are a variety of treatment options for colorectal cancer; for some patients, a combination of treatment methods may be used.

Check out the conversation by viewing the chat transcript! Here are just a few questions from the chat:

Question: How prevalent is family history? Should I have a plan to have [colorectal cancer] testing done?

  • Answer from Dr. Rosen: Approximately 15% of colorectal cancer patients have a family history of the cancer.
  • Answer from Dr. El-Rayes: Family history is an important predictor of the risk of developing colon cancer. Patients with family history of multiple relatives with colorectal or other cancers should seek evaluation to determine if their family history puts them at added risk for developing cancer. At Winship we have a multidisciplinary team that includes geneticists, genetic counselors, colorectal surgeons, gastroenterologists, and medical oncologists who can work with families who have inherited pre-dispositions for colon cancer.

Question: If you have been diagnosed/hospitalized (8 years ago) with divraticulos how often should you have a colonoscopy? And is it related to bleeding that starts and stops when you are stressed and your bowels lock up? And is it hereditary?

  • Answer from Dr. Rosen: Diverticular disease does not have any bearing on risk of colorectal cancer, so it does not change surveillance or screening recommendations. It can cause bleeding, and there is possibly a hereditary component.
  • Answer from Dr. El-Rayes: The frequency of colonoscopy is dependent on family history, presence of chronic inflammatory conditions (like Ulcerative colitis) and presence of polyps. Diverticulosis of in of itself does not impact the risk of developing colon cancer.

Question: If a person with family history of Colon Cancer can’t afford the test who can help them?

  • Answer from Dr. Rosen: The Affordable Care Act offers free screening for colorectal cancer.

 

If you missed this chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. For more information go to the Colorectal Cancer at Winship Cancer Institute website or 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse.

cta-learn-blue

If you have additional questions for Drs. El-Rayes & Rosen, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

With a Little Help from Friends

lex gilbert cancer survivorI always assumed that cancer would catch up with me one day. After all, my mother and two of my aunts had breast cancer so I figured I must be next in line. Yet it never occurred to me that the rectal bleeding I’d been experiencing could be colon cancer. Surely the sigmoidoscopy ordered by my doctor would lead me to a quick fix and that would be that. Surprise! When I woke up after the procedure, she came to my bedside and told me I had colon cancer.

When I heard those words I went numb. The world looked as it might if viewed through a funhouse mirror. I remember someone standing nearby handing me a box of Kleenex. I didn’t need the Kleenex. I didn’t cry until many weeks later and boy did I need Kleenex then. I think my soul just closed up shop so it could absorb the gravity of my situation at its own pace, and when it was ready to let go of the emotions, it let go.

Believe me, I am not one of those survivors who talk about what a gift it was to have cancer! I certainly would have preferred to learn the lessons taught by cancer in a less painful way, but all things being equal, there were important lessons learned and I think they are clearly worth passing along. Here’s one.

I pride myself on being self-sufficient and independent. One of the most difficult aspects of being a patient was accepting help from friends. When they offered, I’d say that we didn’t need anything even though that was utterly and completely false. Husbands come in handy sometimes and mine immediately jumped on my reluctance to let folks “in.” At the same time, a dear friend and colleague set up an on-line calendar where I could post what I needed and friends could sign up to help. I could ask for someone to buy me groceries on Wednesday, or help me get the house in order on Saturday, or mow the lawn, drive me to an appointment, or just plain keep me company.

The overwhelming response to the calendar and the ensuing discussions made me realize that when people offer help, they want to help! What a revelation! Too many of us deny our friends the satisfaction and fulfillment that helping someone in need gives them. Allowing folks to help also brings them into our lives in a deeper way, resulting in even more satisfying friendships. The Jedi mind-trick is that letting people help is a gift to them, as well as a gift to you.

About Lex Gilbert

Lex Gilbert is a cancer survivor and very active volunteer with Winship Cancer Institute. She originally comes from southern California, where she ran her own marketing and promotions company serving major corporate clients from throughout the U.S. She has been a life-long volunteer and was awarded “top volunteer” by the County of San Diego for her work mentoring a child in foster care. She moved to Atlanta in 2007 and now works in the Office of Health Promotion at Emory. She was awarded the CLASS Distinguished Service Honor in the Division of Campus Life. Bruce Gilbert, her husband of 32 years, is a musician fighting Parkinson’s disease and also volunteers at Winship as a pianist.

Related Resources

Colon Cancer Chat Transcript

An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part I: Risk Factors, Symptoms & Diagnosis

An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part II: Prevention, Diagnosis & Treatment

Winship Cancer Institute – Colon Cancer Resources

Find a primary physician through our Emory Healthcare Network or call Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse.

“Top Secret” Cancer Facts Worth Sharing

cancer secretsIt’s time to stop being embarrassed about the 3rd most commonly diagnosed cancer and the 3rd leading cause of cancer death for both men and women. More than 140,000 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year and nearly 50,000 will lose their battle to the disease according to The American Cancer Society.

It’s colon cancer awareness month – share the facts about how a colorectal cancer screening could save your life.

A study, published in JAMA Surgery and recently reported in the NYT, showed that incidences of colorectal cancer have been decreasing by about 1 percent a year since the mid 1980s. Simply said, more people under the recommended screening age of 50 are being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

Colon cancer is not embarrassing. There’s simply no sense in keeping secrets from your physician. If you have a history of colorectal cancer in your family or have particular symptoms that you’re unsure about then it’s time to get the facts from your doctor. Speak openly about your risk factors, prevention, early detection, and treatment.
Prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer are possible by appropriately scheduling a colorectal cancer screening. A conversation with your doctor is always confidential; make it honest and candid.

As a Nurse Practitioner in gastrointestinal cancers, I have had many patients who have stated that they wish they had gotten a colonoscopy as recommended for colorectal cancer screening. They also say they now preach to everyone they know to get their colonoscopies.

Find a primary physician through our Emory Healthcare Network or call Health Connection at 404-778-7777 to learn more from a registered nurse. No topic is top secret or off limits.

About Ms. Brutcher
Edith Brutcher

A chemotherapy infusion specialist and adult nurse practitioner, Ms. Brutcher’s clinical specialties include gastrointestinal and aerodigestive cancers. She has 27 years experience as a Registered Nurse, and 8 years as an Adult Nurse Practitioner with Medical Oncology. She obtained her Master of Science in Nursing Adult Practitioner, specializing in oncology and immunology, at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Related Resources

Colon Cancer Chat Transcript
An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part I: Risk Factors, Symptoms & Diagnosis
An Intro to Colorectal Cancer Part II: Prevention, Diagnosis & Treatment
Winship Cancer Institute – Colon Cancer Resources