A More Precise Blood Test Outperforms PSA Screening in Detecting Aggressive Prostate Cancers

Martin Sanda, MDMartin Sanda, MD, a member of the Winship Cancer Institute, chairman of the Emory Department of Urology and internationally recognized prostate cancer scientist, recently delivered big news about better prostate cancer diagnosis, at the American Urological Association’s 2013 Annual Meeting.

As corresponding and presenting author of the abstract “Prostate Health Index (phi) for Reducing Overdetection of Indolent Prostate Cancer and Unnecessary Biopsy While Improving Detection of Aggressive Cancers,” Sanda presented findings that represent a significant step towards better detection and diagnosing of fast-growing prostate cancers, and fewer unnecessary biopsies of indolent cancers.

The Prostate Health Index (phi), a blood test used to evaluate the probability of prostate cancer diagnosis, outperformed commonly used prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and free/total prostate-specific antigen (%fPSA) tests in predicting the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer and in improving prostate cancer detection, according to the new study. The phi test focuses on measuring a subtype of PSA, called pro-PSA, that unlike the rudimentary total PSA, is preferentially made by aggressive prostate cancers and less so by normal prostate or slow-growing cancers. Sanda and his collaborators found that among men being considered for prostate biopsy due to abnormal results on the traditional “total” PSA test, one in four had phi test results that indicated no aggressive cancer would be found and unnecessary biopsy could be averted.

To learn more about this exciting new screening test, read the full story in the Emory News Center. For more prostate cancer and PSA screening related articles, check out our related resources at the end of this post.

About Martin Sanda, MD

Martin G. Sanda, MD is chair of the Department of Urology at Emory University School of Medicine and Urology service chief for Emory Healthcare. Before joining Emory in 2013, Sanda was Professor of Surgery in Urology at Harvard Medical School, Director of the Prostate Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and co-leader of the Prostate Cancer Program at the Dana Farber Cancer Center.

As a urological surgeon specializing in cancers of the prostate and bladder, Sanda focuses on developing new surgical and non-surgical approaches to cancer care and to improving the quality of life among cancer survivors.  Currently, he is spearheading studies that seek to develop urine tests for detecting prostate cancer; develop benchmarks for improving quality of life among cancer survivors; and develop innovative prostate cancer vaccines.

Sanda has served as chair of the Prostate and Genito-Urinary Collaborative Group of the National Cancer Institute’s Early Detection Research Network (2007-2010), has led two nationwide, NCI Cooperative Group prostate cancer clinical trials, and has served on the Research Council of the American Urological Association since 2011.  Dr. Sanda will also serve as Director of the Prostate Cancer Center, being established within the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

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