Veterans Program

Dr. Rothbaum on How PTSD Affects Veterans

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can result from a traumatic or life-threatening event such as military combat. Thousands of servicemembers and Veterans struggle with PTSD. Often, they resist seeking help because of negative ideas about PTSD or the fear of what others might think. PTSD can affect personal relationships and even destroy families.

Question: Can you have PTSD even though you didn’t see combat?

Rothbaum_BarbaraDr. Rothbaum: Absolutely. PTSD can result from any event in which someone felt that they or someone they care about could be seriously injured or killed. Sexual assault survivors, motor vehicle crash survivors, natural disaster survivors, and many others develop PTSD. Approximately 10% of the US population at any given time has PTSD, and most of this is not from combat.

 

Question: What treatment options do you offer besides talking to a counselor? Talking has got me no where.

Rothbaum_BarbaraDr. Rothbaum: Good question. We offer what are known as evidence based treatments for PTSD, meaning that controlled studies have shown that these treatments work. “Talking therapy” alone is not one of the treatments that has been shown to work for PTSD. At Emory Healthcare Veterans Program, we are offering Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy, Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRE), and others, as well as pharmacotherapy and the combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. We are offering two tiers of treatment: Tier I are the evidenced based treatments, and Tier II are more innovative treatments for folks who don’t receive an adequate response from Tier I treatments. You can learn more about the treatment options available at http://emoryhealthcare.org/veterans-program/treatments-services/index.html

 

Learn more about the Integrated Memory Care ClinicTo make an appointment, call 888-514-5345

PTSD Awareness Day- June 27th

ptsd-squareJune 27th is PTSD Awareness Day. With summer here and the 4th of July around the corner, Emory Healthcare Veterans Program would like to remind you that fireworks can cause discomfort for our combat veterans. Good times for you can be agonizing for them, please be mindful and courteous and take the time to educate yourself and your family about PTSD.

1. Learn:

There are many resources available to learn about PTSD. Emory Healthcare Veterans Program would be happy to send one of our veterans to educate your organization PTSD. If you desire to have this opportunity please contact Gretchen Evans at 404.727.8325 or by email: gretchen.evans@emoryhealthcare.org

If you or a loved one is a post 9/11 veteran who struggles with symptons of PTSD, TBI or other depression or anxiety disorders please contact the Emory Veterans Program Care Coordinator at 1-888-514-5345.

2. Be Aware:

Find out if any of your neighbors are combat veterans and if they are inform them that you will be celebrating with fireworks so that they will not be surprised and can have the opportunity prepare themselves. They do not wish to ruin your fun, but this allows them to make other arrangements if necessary.

3. Know the facts:

Know that a high percentage of veterans suffer from PTSD. Know that treatment is available and that treatment is very successful.

If you or a loved one is a post 9/11 veteran who struggles with symptoms of PTSD, TBI or other depression or anxiety disorders please contact the Emory Veterans Program Care Coordinator at 1-888-514-5345.

Takeaways from Dr. Rauch’s Live Chat on Veterans Reintegration and Mental Health

vet-ptsd-allchatThank you to everyone who joined us on November 10, for our live chat on “Veterans Reintegration and Mental Health” hosted by Sheila Rauch, Ph. D., clinical director of the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program.

We had many good questions submitted by veterans and their loved ones, and we hope that you found the discussion informative. If you missed the chat or are interested in reviewing all of Dr. Rauch’s answers, you can view the chat transcript.

Below are a few highlights:

Question:
How long does it usually take to adjust to normal life again? How long should I wait to see someone if I’m still not feeling like my normal self?

sheila-rauch-avatar

Dr. Rauch:
That is a good question. If at any time you’re having issues that you feel that you need or want help with, you should come see us. Readjustment often takes a year, and for some people longer, to feel like they’re really back in their life. The readjustment process is different for every individual and often depends on life’s variables, such as your job, social support and your family. It’s never too early to come talk with someone familiar with military service and deployment about your experience. Reintegration can be a difficult process. Mental health issues, traumatic brain injury and military sexual trauma can make that even harder. The Emory Veterans Program is here to help you reclaim your life.

Question:
My brother has seemed moody and depressed since he got back. Is there a good way for me to help him or encourage him to talk to someone about how he’s feeling?

sheila-rauch-avatarDr. Rauch:
It is common for returning veterans to have problems talking with people who have not deployed. While most veterans returning don’t have mental health issues, a significant minority may have problems with depression, posttraumatic stress or traumatic brain injury. Letting your brother know that you’re willing to listen or help is probably the best thing you can do. Sometimes it just takes patience to allow someone to open up.

 

To learn more about Emory’s Veterans Program, visit our website and view the summary video. To make an appointment, call 888-514-5345.

Veterans Reintegration and Mental Health Live Chat

vet-ptsd-chatAre you experiencing a difficult reintegration process after returning from a military deployment? Are you a spouse or loved one with questions about how to best prepare for a service member’s return home and how to navigate this joyful yet stressful time?

Join Dr. Sheila Rauch, clinical director of the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program, for a live web chat Tuesday, November 10 at 12pm EST. You can ask questions and get real answers regarding PTSD, military deployment-related stress, and the complexities of reintegration. Register for this live chat here. 

When a deployed service member returns home, reintegration with friends and loved ones can be difficult; profoundly more so for those suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Among other things, the contrast between a service member’s expectations upon returning home and what he or she actually experiences can create stress for everyone involved. Mental health issues, including PTSD, depression, substance misuse, grief, anger, and even suicide, may arise during this reintegration process. While any or all of these issues could occur, excellent treatment resources are available through the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program and the VA.

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