Uncategorized

Dementia Resources We Trust

At Emory’s Integrated Memory Care Clinic (IMCC), we often field questions from family members and caregivers who’ve been doing their own research. And while we encourage you to educate yourself, it can be difficult to separate facts from theories and to make sure your resources are reputable. We’ve set out to provide a list of reliable and trustworthy resources. This isn’t intended to be an all-encompassing list, but these are almost always our first recommendations.

Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association offers information about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias including Lewy Body and Vascular dementias. You’ll find information on everything from legislation related to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease to local resources, such as caregiver training and support groups, programs such as SafeReturn® and stage-specific information.
View Alzheimer’s Association >>

National Institute on Aging

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) works to understand the nature of aging and the aging process. The institute’s mission includes supporting and conducting aging-related research and sharing information related to this research with the general public, health care professionals, and research scientists. The site has information on healthy aging, caregiving, and end of life planning. You’ll also find information on the latest in aging-related research. 
View National Institute on Aging >>

Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR)

1-800-438-4380 (toll-free) adear@nia.nih.gov
The National Institute on Aging’s ADEAR Center offers free information about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias for families, caregivers and health professionals. Visit the site to find information on topics like disease basics, causes, symptoms, treatment, caregiving, and research and trials. ADEAR Center staff answer telephone, email and written requests, and make referrals to local and national resources. You can contact ADEAR for answers to specific questions about Alzheimer’s disease, referrals to local support services and research centers as well as information about clinical trials, Spanish language resources and training materials.
View Alzheimer’s Disease Education & Referral (ADEAR) >>

Books

The 36 hour day: A Family Guide to Caring for People who have Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementias, and Memory Loss – Nancy L. Mace and Peter V. Rabins – Offers a great deal of useful information including practical and legal advice, but can feel a little clinical.

Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s: A Groundbreaking Approach for Everyone Dealing with the Disease – Joanne Koenig Coste – Focuses on the emotional well-being of both patient and caregivers.

Creating Moments of Joy Along the Alzheimer’s Journey: A Guide for Families and Caregivers – Jolene Brackey – This best-seller focuses on the idea that while caregivers cannot create perfect days for people with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, they can create moments of joy that linger on as a positive feeling long after the moment has passed. Includes practical advice along with encouragement and humor.

The Alzheimer’s Action Plan: The Experts’ Guide to the Best Diagnosis and Treatment for Memory Problems – P. Murali Doraiswamy M.D. and Gwyther, Lisa P., M.S.W. – Combines the insights of a physician and social worker and includes information on diagnosis, treatments, and guidance for coping with changes in early and middle stages.

Living Your Best with Early-stage Alzheimer’s: An Essential Guide – Lisa Snyder – Intended as a working guide to help the person with Alzheimer’s move forward once diagnosed.

What If It’s Not Alzheimer’s?: A Caregiver’s Guide to DementiaGary Radin, Lisa Radin, and Murray Grossman   A comprehensive guide to dealing with Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), one of the largest groups of non-Alzheimer’s dementias.

Coach Broyles’ Playbook for Alzheimer’s Caregivers – Frank BroylesWritten with the hope that others could benefit from his family’s experience caring for his wife, Coach Frank Broyles offers relevant tips and strategies for caring for a loved one with dementia.


The Integrated Memory Care Clinic

The Integrated Memory Care Clinic (IMCC) is a nationally recognized patient-centered medical home that provides primary care individualized for someone living with dementia and is designed to replace your current primary care provider. In other words, the IMCC becomes the primary care provider for a patient with dementia. Our goal is to provide the best dementia-sensitive primary care. If you’d like to learn more about the IMCC, or think one of your patients or family members could benefit from our services, please contact our patient services coordinator at 404-712-6929. To read more about the IMCC, please visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/imcc.

Getting Help for Dementia in Your Community

Getting Help for Dementia in Your CommunityAt Emory’s Integrated Memory Care Clinic (IMCC), we know that caring for family members or loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias can be challenging, especially on your own. Thankfully, options for care exist within the community. Different options will be right for different patients, as some patients in the early stages of dementia won’t need nearly as much assistance or supervision as people with advanced dementia. We’ve included several options for community-based care below, ranked from the options with the least restrictions that provide the lowest amount of hands-on care to those with increased security and restrictions that provide the highest level of hands-on care.

Senior Centers

The Older Americans Act (OAA), originally enacted in 1965, provides resources for Senior Centers. There are currently more than 10,000 centers in the U.S. serving more than a million adults each day. These centers offer services like meal and nutrition programs, health, fitness, and wellness programs, transportation programs, social activities, education and arts programs and public benefits counseling. These are a good option for people in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s or related dementias.

Adult Day Programs

These programs offer a place for your loved one with dementia to go, interact with others, socialize and engage. These programs typically exist in a secure environment so patients can’t wander off and leave the facility. This becomes important for patients with cognitive impairment who could become lost in unfamiliar settings. The programming at facilities like these is created specifically for people with limited attention spans and cognition, so your loved one won’t become frustrated, and will be able to enjoy the activities.

Adult Day Programs are focused either on a medical or social model. Most programs are the social version. Adult Day Programs designed with a medical model can provide a higher level of care. For example, patients experiencing urinary incontinence will typically need to be in a program with a medical model.

Hours and days of the week vary by program, some offer weekday care only and others offer care on weekends. These programs typically offer a more affordable option to in-home care, as you can expect to pay anywhere from $35-$80 a day vs. paying in-home help a higher hourly rate.

Adult Day programs help keep dementia patients in their homes longer by keeping them socially engaged and giving them a structured routine. This may help your loved one sleep better, improve their health and give caregivers like you a much-needed break.

Respite Care: Residential or in-home

Respite care is very time-limited and can happen either in-home or in a residential facility. It provides temporary care when family members or caregivers need a break, has an emergency or needs to travel. You can arrange for shifts with home care to ensure coverage while you’re gone, and some assisted living or personal care homes do offer respite care in their facility. In this scenario, the patient would move into the community for a set amount of time, sometimes into a fully furnished room. Expect to pay for this out of pocket.

Assisted Living/Personal Care Home

These facilities can vary in size and in the level of care they provide. They can be large 100-apartment senior living communities or small 4-bed home with one person providing care. The biggest difference between the two is the ability of assisted living facilities to provide more help for people needing a higher level of care. And while these facilities can provide care for a loved one who needs more socialization or is difficult to care for at home, they still feel like homes, not skilled nursing communities. Larger communities can have activity directors with daily programming. These homes can have secure memory care units that include extra staff and increased security.

Skilled Nursing

Long-Term Skilled Nursing facilities (SNF) provide nursing home level care and are staffed with nurses and a medical director. These are usually the last option for many families, but they can be the best option for medically complicated patients or patients who can’t walk, transfer and ambulate. For bed-bound patients living outside their home, this level of care is almost required.

When IMCC patients move to Long-Term skilled nursing facilities like these, we transfer their medical care to the facility. From that point on, the SNF medical director manages all of the patient’s care. Medicare does not cover custodial care, and it can be expensive. Medicaid can pay for care in a skilled nursing facility. This can become the only option available for many families.

The Integrated Memory Care Clinic

The Integrated Memory Care Clinic (IMCC) is a nationally recognized patient-centered medical home that provides primary care individualized for someone living with dementia and is designed to replace your current primary care provider. Our goal is to provide the best dementia-sensitive primary care. If you’d like to learn more about the IMCC, or think one of your patients or family members could benefit from our services, please contact our patient services coordinator at 404-712-6929.

To learn more, please visit the Integrated Memory Care Clinic.

You’re Not Alone: A Mental Health Message for our Veterans

Veterans are 15x more likely to suffer from PTSD. If you have a service-related mental health issue, you’re not alone. Get help today.Our veterans and service members are some of the most brave men and women in our country. They’re passionate and disciplined when it comes to protecting and serving our country, which is a commitment we’re grateful for every day.

The invisible wounds of war

That bravery continues off duty as well — many carry the heavy weight of the sights and experiences they encountered while serving. Consider these statistics:

  • 20 percent of veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan suffer from depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
  • A 2014 JAMA Psychiatry study found PTSD to be 15 times more likely for veterans and service members compared to civilians. The same report found depression to occur 5 times more frequently among military members than civilians.
  • The same study from JAMA found 1 in 4 active duty military members suffer from a mental health condition.

PTSD, anxiety, traumatic brain injury (TBI), military sexual trauma (MST) and other mental health conditions can all occur as a result of military service. And, these health issues are every bit as serious as injuries we can see.

Healing these wounds

Our veterans and service members need access to quality mental health programs. They also need to know it’s okay to talk about their experiences. If someone you love may be suffering from a mental health issue, please check in with them regularly. Ask them how they’re doing and be ready to simply listen.

If you’re a veteran or service member suffering from any mental health symptom or condition, please reach out for help. Talk to a friend, family member or fellow veteran. Most importantly, don’t be afraid to seek professional help. You should never be embarrassed to get treatment for a mental health issue.

Honor our veterans and service members this Veterans Day by sharing this message with others. You can also help change the way the world sees mental health by taking the stigma-free pledge.

Do you want to learn more about the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program?

Yes, I want to learn more now.

Emory’s Veterans Program is Helping Heal the Invisible Wounds of War

military-familyEmory Healthcare launched Emory’s Veterans Program Sept. 1, a new program for veterans offering clinical care, research and education, focusing on comprehensive treatment for post-9/11 veterans suffering from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), anxiety, depression and conditions stemming from Military Sexual Trauma (MST). Comprised of several initiatives committed to the health and wellbeing of veterans, including Wounded Warrior Project’s newly established Warrior Care Network, Emory is one of four academic medical centers that make up the national network offering quality mental health care for post-9/11 veterans, at no cost to qualified individuals.

“Our program focuses on helping heal the invisible wounds of war, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury,” says Barbara Rothbaum, PhD, director of Emory’s Veterans Program and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University School of Medicine.

According to research conducted by RAND Corporation, about 18.5% of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans suffer from PTSD or depression, and 19.5% report having experienced a traumatic brain injury during deployment.

Emory’s Veterans Program is collaborative by design and incorporates top specialists in psychiatry, psychology, neurology, rehabilitative medicine and wellness into a treatment team that assess each veteran’s needs in order to develop a comprehensive, individualized treatment plan.

“It is important to be able to meet a veteran where he is, and provide individualized treatment plans using a collaborative approach,” says Rothbaum. “We’re so committed to this that we have hired veterans to fill critical positions within the program to ensure we are appropriately meeting the needs of the service members we treat.”

Treating victims of military sexual trauma is another aspect of Emory’s Veterans Program. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, an estimated 20,000 service members, both male and female, endured military sexual trauma in 2014 alone, ranging from sexually hostile work environments to rape. Treatment often involves prolonged exposure therapy that incorporates virtual reality technology as well as other types of therapy and medications.

Collaborating with the Center for Deployment Psychology and several other organizations, Emory’s Veterans Program strives to enhance providers’ ability to deliver quality care to veterans. The program provides free, specialized training to community behavioral health providers in understanding military culture and how it plays a part in the treatment of service members.

For more information about Emory’s Veterans Program, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/veterans. To reach the Care Coordinator, call 888-514-5345.