Emory Brain Health Center

Getting Help for Dementia in Your Community

Getting Help for Dementia in Your CommunityAt Emory’s Integrated Memory Care Clinic (IMCC), we know that caring for family members or loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias can be challenging, especially on your own. Thankfully, options for care exist within the community. Different options will be right for different patients, as some patients in the early stages of dementia won’t need nearly as much assistance or supervision as people with advanced dementia. We’ve included several options for community-based care below, ranked from the options with the least restrictions that provide the lowest amount of hands-on care to those with increased security and restrictions that provide the highest level of hands-on care.

Senior Centers

The Older Americans Act (OAA), originally enacted in 1965, provides resources for Senior Centers. There are currently more than 10,000 centers in the U.S. serving more than a million adults each day. These centers offer services like meal and nutrition programs, health, fitness, and wellness programs, transportation programs, social activities, education and arts programs and public benefits counseling. These are a good option for people in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s or related dementias.

Adult Day Programs

These programs offer a place for your loved one with dementia to go, interact with others, socialize and engage. These programs typically exist in a secure environment so patients can’t wander off and leave the facility. This becomes important for patients with cognitive impairment who could become lost in unfamiliar settings. The programming at facilities like these is created specifically for people with limited attention spans and cognition, so your loved one won’t become frustrated, and will be able to enjoy the activities.

Adult Day Programs are focused either on a medical or social model. Most programs are the social version. Adult Day Programs designed with a medical model can provide a higher level of care. For example, patients experiencing urinary incontinence will typically need to be in a program with a medical model.

Hours and days of the week vary by program, some offer weekday care only and others offer care on weekends. These programs typically offer a more affordable option to in-home care, as you can expect to pay anywhere from $35-$80 a day vs. paying in-home help a higher hourly rate.

Adult Day programs help keep dementia patients in their homes longer by keeping them socially engaged and giving them a structured routine. This may help your loved one sleep better, improve their health and give caregivers like you a much-needed break.

Respite Care: Residential or in-home

Respite care is very time-limited and can happen either in-home or in a residential facility. It provides temporary care when family members or caregivers need a break, has an emergency or needs to travel. You can arrange for shifts with home care to ensure coverage while you’re gone, and some assisted living or personal care homes do offer respite care in their facility. In this scenario, the patient would move into the community for a set amount of time, sometimes into a fully furnished room. Expect to pay for this out of pocket.

Assisted Living/Personal Care Home

These facilities can vary in size and in the level of care they provide. They can be large 100-apartment senior living communities or small 4-bed home with one person providing care. The biggest difference between the two is the ability of assisted living facilities to provide more help for people needing a higher level of care. And while these facilities can provide care for a loved one who needs more socialization or is difficult to care for at home, they still feel like homes, not skilled nursing communities. Larger communities can have activity directors with daily programming. These homes can have secure memory care units that include extra staff and increased security.

Skilled Nursing

Long-Term Skilled Nursing facilities (SNF) provide nursing home level care and are staffed with nurses and a medical director. These are usually the last option for many families, but they can be the best option for medically complicated patients or patients who can’t walk, transfer and ambulate. For bed-bound patients living outside their home, this level of care is almost required.

When IMCC patients move to Long-Term skilled nursing facilities like these, we transfer their medical care to the facility. From that point on, the SNF medical director manages all of the patient’s care. Medicare does not cover custodial care, and it can be expensive. Medicaid can pay for care in a skilled nursing facility. This can become the only option available for many families.

The Integrated Memory Care Clinic

The Integrated Memory Care Clinic (IMCC) is a nationally recognized patient-centered medical home that provides primary care individualized for someone living with dementia and is designed to replace your current primary care provider. Our goal is to provide the best dementia-sensitive primary care. If you’d like to learn more about the IMCC, or think one of your patients or family members could benefit from our services, please contact our patient services coordinator at 404-712-6929.

To learn more, please visit the Integrated Memory Care Clinic.

Help at Home for People with Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias

Dementia, Memory careAt the Integrated Memory Care Clinic, we often field questions from family members and caregivers who are confused about the types of in-home care available for their loved one with Alzheimer’s or related dementia. It can be difficult to know where to start. But you’re already on the right path—learning more about the types of care available is a great first step. If you’ve already decided to support your loved one with care in their home, there are many great services available to give you much needed support. We’ve outlined the differences in types of care available below, and are happy to help our patients and their families navigate the options.

Home Care

Home Care is the basic level of 24/7 care that many people with dementia need. This companion care typically involves making sure your loved one has meals, gets to where they need to go, and can involve help with feeding, getting up and around, and personal care like showers and hygiene.

Medicare does not cover Home Care. You will have to pay for this privately, but it may be covered by long-term care insurance policies or VA benefits. Medicaid waiver programs also provide vouchers for in-home care for low-income patients and families.

Home Care can be hired privately or through an agency. Each has benefits and drawbacks. When hiring through a Home Care agency, you’ll have a large pool of people to pull from, so if your caregiver has an illness or needs to miss work, other team members can fill that shift. The agency will handle the liability insurance, payroll, and other issues that come with hiring an employee. You will, however, pay more for these added benefits.

If you hire someone privately for Home Care, you’ll probably pay less and have more flexibility. You may also have more options for a better personality fit when hiring privately. However, you also assume the responsibilities of an employer. You’ll need to have liability insurance, manage payroll and resolve the other issues that come with having an employee.

Home Health

This type of care requires a doctor’s order and may be provided by registered nurses and physical, speech, or occupational therapists. It includes services like changing IV fluids, injections, physical therapy, monitoring of vital signs and wound care. We often see a need for Home Health Care after a dramatic change in condition. Medicare does provide coverage for these kinds of services on a very time-limited basis.

Aging Life Care Managers

Aging life care management is a holistic, client-centered approach to caring for older adults or others facing ongoing health challenges. This service will be private pay. The service provider may act as a case manager that will coordinate care between doctor’s appointments, arrange for transportation, serve as a high-level patient advocate if needed, and even provide services like making sure there’s food in the house. This can be helpful when your loved one can’t always remember their doctor’s instructions or if you are providing long-distance caregiving. Visit the Aging Life Care Association’s website for more information.

Home Delivered Meals

This service can help keep your loved one in their homes longer, as people suffering from Alzheimer’s and related dementias often struggle following recipes and preparing meals. It will include delivery of hot, cold or frozen prepared meals. This service is not covered by insurance. Organizations like Meals on Wheels or other private community-based organizations will also deliver meals for low-income patients who cannot afford this service.


The Integrated Memory Care Clinic

The Integrated Memory Care Clinic (IMCC) is a nationally recognized patient-centered medical home that provides primary care individualized for someone living with dementia. The IMCC is designed to replace a person living with dementia’s current primary care provider. Our goal is to provide the best dementia-sensitive primary care. If you’d like to learn more about the IMCC, take a tour of our facility, or think one of your patients or family members could benefit from our services, please contact the IMCC at 404-712-6929.

Inpatient Psychiatric Care

Inpatient Psychiatric CareFinding compassionate inpatient psychiatric care for mental and behavioral health conditions is every bit as important as finding a health provider for your physical health. Yet, because there’s a stigma surrounding mental health conditions, we often neglect ourselves the care we deserve.

Even if you’ve never experienced symptoms personally, chances are you know someone who has. One in five adults in our country has dealt with mental illness, and one in 25 experiences a serious mental condition at some point in their life. These serious mental conditions sometimes require temporary hospitalization.

At Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods, we provide empathetic inpatient psychiatric care for mental and behavioral health conditions.

When is Inpatient Psychiatric Care Needed?

Inpatient psychiatric care may be needed if you or a loved one have:

  • Acute behavioral disorder, such as paranoia, delusions, hallucinations or schizophrenia
  • Co-occurring conditions, such as substance abuse
  • Mental illness that has temporarily worsened
  • Suicidal thoughts or the potential to harm others

A safe and supportive environment is essential. One where you or your loved one can be closely monitored. During the stay, a specially trained care team will work with you and your family to stabilize the condition and put you on the path to recovery. A care plan may include:

  • Addiction counseling
  • Family education
  • Group counseling
  • Help with life and coping skills
  • Medication Management
  • Psychotherapy
  • Psychiatric evaluation

If you’re a caregiver or family member, your support is critical to your loved one’s recovery. You will be considered a part of the care team and encouraged to participate in all aspects of their treatment.

If you’ve had to make the decision to hospitalize your loved one involuntarily, we know it wasn’t easy. But remember it’s actually more caring than it seems — inpatient psychiatric care may be the only way your loved one can get the care they need, especially if there is risk of suicide or harm to others.

What Happens After You’re Discharged?

After receiving short-term inpatient care, you can step down to outpatient treatment. We offer many outpatient behavioral health programs depending on your needs, including a Transitional Care Clinic. In this nurse-driven program, we will follow your recovery for 30 days. The program’s goal is to ensure you’re receiving the proper aftercare treatment and to prevent another hospitalization.

Take the Next Step

If you believe you or a loved one may need inpatient psychiatric care, please call us at 404-728-6222. Our licensed behavioral health evaluators are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Learn more about Inpatient Psychiatric Care at Emory.

VIEW INPATIENT PSYCHIATRIC CARE

 

Adult Autism: Beyond the School Years

Adult Autism ImageMost people think of high school graduation as an exciting new beginning. But to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), it’s often a time of confusion, stress and flat-out fear. They must confront the reality and challenges of their kid’s adult autism. Depending on the state, educational supports and services received under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act will disappear. Dr. Cubells, Director of Medical and Adult Services at Emory Autism Center, says “What now?” is one of the most common questions that he hears.

Loss of Supports with Adult Autism

In the U.S., federal laws such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) ensure that children with ASD (and other disabilities) receive school-based supports to help them succeed. Supports may include speech or occupational therapy, a personal aide in the classroom and other interventions. Unfortunately, once school ends, so do these added supports.

Leaving the school system can be the beginning of an arduous journey as families try to navigate their way through the adult world. The loss of support and services for young adults with ASD leaving high school is abrupt, and there are few legal provisions mandating help for adults with disabilities, including adult autism.

The Challenge of Independence

It’s impossible to generalize about the lives of adults with ASD. Obviously, not everyone on the spectrum shares the same challenges or experiences. Some may be able to live independently, and even make important contributions to science, music, and other fields. Others will need daily care throughout their lives. Many will land somewhere in-between and may need to rely on their families or social services in ways that extend well beyond the norm.

Life Skills

If we reflect on what a typical happy and healthy adult life entails, core issues such as a good job, safe place to live and the ability to make choices about our lives are all important. Unfortunately, some of the challenges commonly associated with adult autism can interfere with the life skills needed to establish this kind of life.

Employment

Gainful employment tends to be a barrier to independence for people with ASD. According to a 2015 report (compiled by Anne M. Roux, Paul Shattuck, and colleagues at Drexel University), only 32% of young adults with ASD in the U.S. worked for pay within the first two years after leaving high school, and only 30% attended any type of college or other post-secondary education.

Emory Autism Center Adult Services

The Emory Autism Center’s adult programs work to address some of the challenges faced by adults with ASD. Our programs emphasize the inclusion of people with adult autism in their own communities and facilitating positive interactions with neurotypical peers.

Psychopharmacology Clinic

Our medication management clinic currently serves more than 300 adults with ASD and related neurodevelopmental disorders. There are no medications available that target the “core” manifestations of ASD, such as difficulties in social communication, repetitive behaviors and disabling focus on specific areas of interest. However, we use a “target symptom” approach to identify and treat conditions that commonly occur with adult autism, such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis.

myLIFE

myLIFE is an active social skills program where adults with ASD mingle with others of similar age and cognitive level, as well as with neurotypical volunteers and staff. To provide a “real life” atmosphere, much of the myLIFE program occurs in a two-bedroom apartment or community setting (recreational centers or food courts) rather than in the clinic building. This enables participants to cook and share meals together, engage in enjoyable social interactions and relax in a safe and accepting atmosphere. In this setting, adults with ASD can learn valuable skills that will serve them well on the job and in their own communities. The goal of myLIFE is to help adults with ASD achieve a fulfilling life in their own home communities.

View myLife Program

Emory Autism Center is the only university-based center in Georgia that serves people with autism of all ages. For more information, please call us at 404-727-8350.

View Emory Autism Center


Joe Cubells, MD, PhD
Director of Medical and Adult Services
Emory Autism Center

Break the Stigma: Let’s Talk About Mental Illness

1 in 5 Americans suffer from a mental illness. Break the silence and seek treatment for a healthier you from the experts at Emory.The words mental illness often bring specific ideas or images to mind. But, the reality is that mental illness affects far more people than you imagine. According to the National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI), approximately 1 in 5 Americans suffer from a mental illness. Those are friends, family members, colleagues and neighbors, or it could be you.

Many factors can contribute to the development of a mental illness such as our genetics (inherited characteristics), our environment and certain life events. While we all experience fear, anxiety and stress from time to time, mental illness is something more — causing disruption to our everyday lives and lasting longer than a typical emotional reaction.

Know the Signs of Mental Illness

Since there are many types of mental illness and since each person is affected differently, it can be hard to recognize the signs. But here are few things to watch for:

  • Changes in work or school performance
  • Excessive worry, fear or sadness
  • Extreme mood changes
  • Inability to handle daily stress
  • Avoiding family, friends and social situations
  • Irritability or aggression
  • Hyperactivity
  • Significant changes in sleeping patterns

A note about treatment resistant depression and anxiety

While depression and anxiety are only a few of many mental health conditions that can be debilitating, they are the most common. These two disorders alone affect more than 16 million adult Americans each year and are the leading cause of disability worldwide. But here’s the good news — they’re treatable. Taking an anti-depressant or going to counseling will ease symptoms for most. But for some, depression and anxiety persist despite these treatments.

Emory’s Treatment Resistant Depression Program was developed to help patients with complex and difficult-to-treat mood disorders. The program has been life changing for many patients who’ve been trying to treat their depression for years. Sadly, because of the stigma surrounding mental illness, far too few will even try to seek help or treatment of any kind.

Do you want to learn more about the Emory Treatment Resistant Depression Program? Yes, I want to learn more now.

Modern Treatments for Depression – Live Chat Takeaways

depression-emailDepression that doesn’t respond to the standard medication or psychological counseling therapies, may be classified as treatment resistant depression (TRD). If you have tried the standard treatments and they have not relieved your symptoms, or your symptoms improve for a time but keep coming back it may be time to ask your doctor about referring you, for a consultation, to a specialist who can diagnose and treats major depression. Members of the TRD program evaluate an individual’s symptoms and current treatment course to see if other newly proven therapies that may offer relief.

We hosted a live chat on Tuesday, September 13 with the care clinicians and psychiatrists from Emory’s Treatment Resistant Depression program. Participants had the opportunity to ask questions and get real-time answers about depression and new treatment options that may be able to help you manage this often chronic condition and improve the quality of your daily life. We received a lot of great questions. Below you can find some highlights from questions we were asked before and during the live chat. You can read the full chat transcript here.

 

Question: I have tried many of the “available” mess for depression with very little result. Is there a difference in depression and bi- polar depression. If so, what are some meds geared toward bipolar depression?

TRD Program Team: Yes, there is a difference between people diagnosed with bipolar depression and, unipolar depression. Bipolar depression has both highs (in the form of manic and hypomanic episodes) and lows in the form of depression. The lows for bipolar and unipolar depression are similar, but treating a person with bipolar depression with an antidepressant puts them at risk of developing mania. So treating a person with bipolar depression can be more difficult.

Persons with bipolar depression may get put on a lot of medications- some for mania, some for depression and some for anxiety. Treating bipolar depression can be challenging and getting expert treatment may involve a comprehensive evaluation, and sometimes using fewer medications rather than more, and using other therapeutic treatments such as psychotherapy is the best option. Our Treatment Resistant Depression program may be an option for someone who has been under psychiatric care with little or no relief, you can find more information on our program here.

 

Question: What is late onset depression, and how can it be treated besides drugs?

TRD Program Team: Late onset depression is depression that starts after the age of 50. Often depression that starts after the age of 50 has a medical cause, so the patient should be evaluated carefully. Psychotherapies are as effective as medications in late-onset depression. You can read more about late-life depression in general here: http://fuquacenter.org/depression

Besides medication and psychotherapies, there are also non-medication treatments available. Treatment options for late-late depression can be found here: http://fuquacenter.org/treatmentoptions

 

Question: My son said he heard Ketamine might help with my depression. Is this true?

TRD Program Team: Yes, Ketamine is an off-label treatment for depression that has been shown to be effective, but it is not widely available and is not an FDA-approved treatment at this time. You can learn about one woman’s story with Ketamine here.

If you are seeking Ketamine treatment through Emory, your psychiatrist can make a referral to our TRD program. You can learn more about that here.

 

Read the full chat transcript here.

Ask the Experts: Modern Treatments for Depression- September 13, 2016

Depression that doesn’t respond to the standard medication or psychological counseling therapies, may be classified as treatment resistant depression (TRD).Do you or a loved one suffer with depression? Has coping with depression been an ongoing challenge with little relief?

Depression that doesn’t respond to the standard medication or psychological counseling therapies, may be classified as treatment resistant depression (TRD). If you have tried the standard treatments and they have not relieved your symptoms, or your symptoms improve for a time but keep coming back it may be time to ask your doctor about referring you, for a consultation, to a specialist who can diagnose and treats major depression. Members of the TRD program evaluate an individual’s symptoms and current treatment course to see if other newly proven therapies that may offer relief.

Join care clinicians and psychiatrists from Emory’s Treatment Resistant Depression program, for a live web chat Tuesday, September 13 at 12noon. You will have the opportunity to ask questions and get real time answers about depression and new treatment options that may be able to help you manage this often chronic condition and improve the quality of your daily life.

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Alzheimer’s Disease: Learn More and Join the Fight

June is Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month. Learn more about brain health and Alzheimer's disease from experts at Emory Brain Health Center.The Fight Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease doesn’t discriminate: We’re all at risk regardless of our education or income level. As we age, our risk of Alzheimer’s and other dementias grows. The Emory Brain Health Center team is working to help us better recognize, understand and fight this devastating disease. June is Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month. Find out more about the most common form of dementia, and how you can join the fight.

What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s disease is a fatal, degenerative brain disease and the most common form of dementia. It affects more than 47 million people around the globe. Alzheimer’s disease leads to problems with:

  • Memory
  • Problem solving
  • Daily tasks
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Vision
  • Understanding time or place
  • Work
  • Socializing
  • Decision-making
  • Mood or personality

Can Anything Stop or Slow Alzheimer’s Disease?

Right now, there is no prevention, cure or proven method to stop the progression of Alzheimer’s. However, certain medicines can improve or slow down symptoms temporarily. And, these lifestyle practices may delay its onset:

  • Regular exercise
  • Mental stimulation
    A healthy, balanced diet

How Can You Join the Fight Against Alzheimer’s Disease?

During the month of June, the Alzheimer’s Association asks people around the world to “go purple” by finding a way to join the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. There are many ways to help – big and small:

  • Show support by wearing purple throughout the month of June
  • Learn more about Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias
  • Start conversations in your community to raise brain health awareness
  • Donate to Alzheimer’s research
  • Consider becoming a volunteer for a clinical trial.

Emory researchers work diligently to uncover the cause of Alzheimer’s disease and to improve treatment options by leading clinical trials. Thanks to volunteers from our community both with and without Alzheimer’s disease, we’re making headway and accelerating Emory’s efforts to find a cure. Would you like to learn more about becoming a volunteer in a clinical trial? Yes, I’d like to learn more now.

You can also make a contribution to the Emory Brain Health Center in support of Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month. Yes, I’d like to make a contribution now.

What Is the Emory Brain Health Center?

In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, the Emory Brain Health Center treats a wide range of conditions that affect the brain, such as:

Would you like to learn more about the Emory Brain Health Center? Yes, I’d like to learn more now.

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Low Back Pain – Types, Treatments & More

back-pain250x250As many of us know, back pain is a common and annoying problem. A majority of adults will have at least one episode of back pain in their life – “throwing out” of the back. Thankfully, in a majority of cases, this improves with a little TLC and time. Unfortunately with some patients, the back pain can become a burden, and potentially life-changing.

The back is a unique area of our body. It is the joining of the upper body with the pelvis and legs, and has stresses and strains that can be more than the back was ‘designed’ for. Additionally, many of us have low back problems that run in the family – and although the genetics have not been formally elicited, these patients can have a particular susceptibility to injury. Injury is another cause of back pain, as is arthritis associated with overuse and old age. Understanding the nature of your back pain, and possibly what may have caused it is sometimes the first step in managing and treating the condition.

Symptoms

The symptoms of back pain are fairly straightforward – in fact, if you are reading this you most likely can identify! The location of the pain is important, as back pain in general can refer to any aspect of the back. Typical ‘back pain’ usually refers to lower back pain in the small of one’s back, just above the buttocks. The type of pain can range from a severe pain to a dull ache. It often gets worse or better depending on activity or exercise. It is important to get a sense of the possible cause (or what you were doing when it started), as well as understanding and communicating with your physician if the pain has changed, and how it has changed. Lastly, back pain can be an isolated event that improves with time (e.g.: six weeks), or episodic, pain that tends to recur perhaps once or several times per year. Occasionally, back pain doesn’t resolve (‘chronic back pain’) and these types of patients are understandably the most frustrated.

When back pain first appears, knowing your body is as important as knowing the history of the pain. Ask yourself the following questions before preparing to see your physician

  • Is it just pain in the back?
  • Where in your back?
  • What makes this pain better or worse?
  • Does the pain travel down your legs and when does this occur?
  • Is there numbness, pins or needles, or weakness in your legs and/or feet?
  • Are there unusual symptoms such as changes in your bowel or bladder?

Back pain from moving a sofa without symptoms in your legs that immediately starts to improve with a change in activity (such as stopping) is often very reassuring. On the other end of the spectrum, back pain that starts with changes in your bowel or bladder is an emergency. Initial treatment may be reduced activity and perhaps anti-inflammatory medications, with other types of symptoms requiring more immediate diagnosis and/or treatment. Evaluation in your local emergency department for significant pain, new numbness or weakness of the bowel and bladder should be considered immediately if these or other worrisome symptoms appear.

Treatment options

General treatment and expectations vary from patient to patient, and physician to physician. After evaluation by a physician, the initial plan of care often includes reduced or altered activity, anti-inflammatory, physical therapy or other modalities including, but not limited to ice, heat or chiropractic. Each care plan is designed by your physician with you in mind, varying from patient to patient. Occasionally, narcotic pain medications or muscle relaxants can help with the initial pain, and a short course of steroids may be prescribed. Additionally, for persistent pain, epidural steroid injections or other more invasive pain procedures can be considered after evaluation by a spinal surgeon. If the pain persists, imaging such as an x-ray or MRI may be considered. It is important to have your physician help interpret the results of your MRI with you; different findings have different meanings in different patients. It can be worrisome to have results that might state ‘multiple disk herniations’ and correlating your symptoms and physical exam to the imaging results carries significantly more weight and importance than the reading alone.

While most low back pain resolves with time, patients may require surgical consideration. Only a spinal surgeon will be able to outline whether you are a surgical candidate, and what option(s) you might have. Spinal surgery has evolved significantly in the last decade to become less invasive and more technologically savvy in some cases. Laser surgery, endoscopic surgery and ‘percutaneous’ surgery (with very small incisions) are all considered as options by your surgeon, along with more traditional, time-tested approaches to surgical intervention. It is important to recognize not all patients are surgical candidates, nor will all surgical patients have resolution of their symptoms.

Regardless of the cause, diagnosis and treatment, patients with low back pain have hope and reassurance there are many options available. Your primary care physician is the best resource for the initial diagnosis and management of back pain. If surgical consideration is needed, the spine specialists at Emory are available for consultation.

Do you have more questions about your back pain or need help selecting a physician?

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About Dr. Mason

mason-alexander-michaelDr. Mason offers a comprehensive and complete neurosurgery line with a patient-centered, multidisciplinary approach. He specializes in conservative case management and forward-thinking evidence-based treatments. His research interests include cerebrovascular disease and treatment, stroke outcomes and atypical variants of aneurysms, such as mycotic- and pseudo-aneurysms. Dolichoectasia of the cerebral vasculature is also of particular interest.

Dr. Mason is a Diplomat of the American Board of Neurological Surgeons. He is an active member of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS). He has been an invited contributing editor of World Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery.

A Look at the Emory Brain Health Center

More than 42 million people in the United States are fighting brain diseases such as depression, Alzheimer’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, stroke, epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease. In fact, chronic neurologic and psychiatric conditions are predicted to be the greatest health issue facing our aging population in the coming years.

To learn more about the Emory Brain Health Center and hear directly from patients about the care they received, please watch this video.

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