Emory’s Veterans Program is Helping Heal the Invisible Wounds of War

military-familyEmory Healthcare launched Emory’s Veterans Program Sept. 1, a new program for veterans offering clinical care, research and education, focusing on comprehensive treatment for post-9/11 veterans suffering from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), anxiety, depression and conditions stemming from Military Sexual Trauma (MST). Comprised of several initiatives committed to the health and wellbeing of veterans, including Wounded Warrior Project’s newly established Warrior Care Network, Emory is one of four academic medical centers that make up the national network offering quality mental health care for post-9/11 veterans, at no cost to qualified individuals.

“Our program focuses on helping heal the invisible wounds of war, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury,” says Barbara Rothbaum, PhD, director of Emory’s Veterans Program and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University School of Medicine.

According to research conducted by RAND Corporation, about 18.5% of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans suffer from PTSD or depression, and 19.5% report having experienced a traumatic brain injury during deployment.

Emory’s Veterans Program is collaborative by design and incorporates top specialists in psychiatry, psychology, neurology, rehabilitative medicine and wellness into a treatment team that assess each veteran’s needs in order to develop a comprehensive, individualized treatment plan.

“It is important to be able to meet a veteran where he is, and provide individualized treatment plans using a collaborative approach,” says Rothbaum. “We’re so committed to this that we have hired veterans to fill critical positions within the program to ensure we are appropriately meeting the needs of the service members we treat.”

Treating victims of military sexual trauma is another aspect of Emory’s Veterans Program. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, an estimated 20,000 service members, both male and female, endured military sexual trauma in 2014 alone, ranging from sexually hostile work environments to rape. Treatment often involves prolonged exposure therapy that incorporates virtual reality technology as well as other types of therapy and medications.

Collaborating with the Center for Deployment Psychology and several other organizations, Emory’s Veterans Program strives to enhance providers’ ability to deliver quality care to veterans. The program provides free, specialized training to community behavioral health providers in understanding military culture and how it plays a part in the treatment of service members.

For more information about Emory’s Veterans Program, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/veterans. To reach the Care Coordinator, call 888-514-5345.

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