Posts Tagged ‘weight management’

Labeling the Food Label

The New Year gives rise to new resolutions, but many have grown tired of attempting unsuccessful diets and seeing numbers on the scale crawl up, year after year. Although there is no magic bullet for weight loss, it is possible to reach your health goals by lifelong commitment to a healthy and balanced diet.

Making healthy choices isn’t as difficult or intimidating as it may seem: one useful strategy is to take advantage of the Nutrition Facts Label (Figure 1). Found on most prepackaged foods, the table is designed to inform consumers about the nutritional content of the food they are purchasing. Read below for a summary of the components:

  • Figure 2: Side-by-Side Comparison of current and new food labels Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    Figure 2: Side-by-Side Comparison of current and new food labels
    Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    Serving size determines the nutrition information you receive—including calories and nutrients—of a food. The amount of each nutrient consumed will change relative to eating more or less than the serving size provided. Serving size and portion size are not the same! The next you eat a meal, try comparing serving size to the amount you actually eat.

  • Calories correspond to the amount of energy by any given food. Consuming excess calories results in unintended weight gain. You are more likely to keep your weight in check by tracking the number of calories you consume. Contact a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) or visit www.myplate.gov to calculate individual calorie needs.
  • Percent Daily Value (%DV) can be used to evaluate whether a food is low (5% DV or less) or high (20% DV or more) in a specific nutrient. Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends choosing foods providing 20% DV or more of vitamins and minerals, and providing 5% DV or less of sodium and saturated fat, the average American consumes excess sodium and saturated fat, and consumes inadequate amounts of key nutrients.
  • The Ingredient List itemizes ingredients by greatest to least weight, and allows consumers to identify the contents of a food product For example, you can use the ingredient list to determine whether a bread has been made from whole or refined wheat.
Figure 2: Side-by-Side Comparison of current and new food labels Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Figure 2: Side-by-Side Comparison of current and new food labels
Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Nutrition recommendations for American have changed considerably since the introduction of the current food label in 1994. To better reflect these changes, the FDA approved a number of revisions on the current food label (Figure 2). The new label is scheduled to launch in 2018, and will feature a more prominent placement of serving sizes and calories, issue a mandatory % Daily Value for added sugars, and introduce values for potassium and vitamin D. Serving size will also change, and will be measured based on the amount American actually consume, versus what they “should” consume: for example, a 20 ounce sports drink will be designated as being one serving, rather than two (or three!).

The Nutrition Facts Label is intended to inform and assist consumers when they are selecting foods, and can become a valuable tool when used to your advantage. Paying attention to the foods you purchase and choose to eat brings you one step closer to achieving your health goals.
References

Emory Bariatric Center

If your resolutions include improving your health and weight loss, let Emory Bariatric Center help you. We offer both surgical and non-surgical weight loss programs. View our website www.emoryhealthcare.org/bariatrics for program options or call 404-778-7777 for more information.

Resources

  1. “Food Labeling Guide”. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. N.p., 2013. Web. 6 Jan. 2017.
  2. “Report Index – 2015 Advisory Report”. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. N.p., 2015. Web. 6 Jan. 2017.
  3. V. R. Delgado, RDN, LD, M. Moyer, MPH, RDN, LD, and E Lin, DO FACS. “The Food Label: A Guide To Educating Bariatric Patients”. Bariatric Surgical Practice and Patient Care 10.3 (2015): 87-92. Web.”Changes To The Nutrition Facts Label”. N.p., 2016. Web. 9 Jan. 2017.

Southern Real Food Plate

square-nutritionReal southern food does not always come from a deep fryer; it’s simmered on the stove, baked in a cast iron skillet, and pulled straight from your grandmother’s garden. The real food plate is a nutritious eating approach that shifts the focus from an entrée to the four corners of the real plate; fruits, grains, legume, and vegetables. These foods are packed with nutrients and are all staples in southern cuisine. This is what our southern real food plate would look like:

Collard Greens:

In the vegetable corner, collard greens are the green, nonstarchy star of this southern plate. Packing in 5 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber in each 1 cup serving of cooked greens; this nutrition powerhouse also has 26% of your Daily Value (DV) of Calcium and 57% of your DV of Vitamin C. Check out our recipe below.

Black Eyed Peas:

We recommend including a ½ cup of legumes everyday and this new years day tradition is the perfect option. Black eyed peas are best when prepared simply, with onions and garlic sautéed in a teaspoon of olive oil, fresh cracked pepper and sea salt, then simmer with water over low heat till tender. In a half-cup of these lucky legumes there are 7 grams of protein, 6 grams of fiber, and 10% of your DV of Iron.

Brown Basmati Rice:

No southern plate is complete without rice to soak of the pot likker. This aromatic rice is packed with whole grain goodness. The fluffy drier texture is the perfect partner to soak up the black-eyed peas’ and collards’ flavorful broths.

Peaches:

Whether fresh or frozen, we’re happy to be able to enjoy this Georgia staple year round. For an easy and nutritious dessert, place 1 cup of fresh or frozen peach slices sprinkled with cinnamon in a microwave safe bowl and cook in 30 second intervals until peaches are heated through. Top these “microwave baked” peaches with a dollop of greek yogurt for the perfect desert year round.

Southern Collard Greens

Smoked paprika replaces the traditional ham hock to retain that smoky flavor without the additional salt and fat. These southern style collard greens will make your guests say, “you sure there ain’t meat in these?”

Ingredients
• ½ small yellow onion, diced
• 3 cloves garlic minced
• 2-3 cups low sodium vegetable broth
• 1 tsp smoked paprika
• ½ tsp red pepper flakes
• 2 lbs collard greens, washed and chopped into 1 in wide strips
• black pepper and hot sauce to taste

Preparation
• Heat a large deep skillet over medium heat. Add 1 tsp vegetable oil and diced onion, sauté until translucent. Add garlic and stir constantly for 2-3 minutes until fragrant but not burnt.
• Add 2 cups vegetable broth, smoked paprika, and red pepper flakes and bring to a simmer.
• Add collard greens to simmering pot and reduce heat to low, simmer for 1 to 1 ½ hours until greens are dark and tender. Check every 30 minutes and add additional broth if needed.
• Add hot sauce, black pepper, or additional red pepper flakes to taste and serve hot.

Nutritional Information
• Servings: 4
• Calories: 87
• Fat: 2.8m
• Saturated Fat: 0 g
• Cholesterol: 0mg
• Sodium: 580mg
• Carbohydrates: 16.2g
• Fiber: 8g
• Protein: 5g

Katie is a culinary nutrition educator born in bred in the heart of Cajun country. Starting life with a unique culinary upbringing with Sicilian, Syrian, and French grandparents, she finds ways to adapt traditional dishes to fit current nutrition recommendations. Katie is currently completing her dietetic internship at Emory University Hospital. Connect with her at https://www.linkedin.com/in/mkatiemoses.

Understanding Nutrition Facts Labels

Nutrition LabelCalories? Fat? Sodium? Carbohydrates? What do you look for on a nutrition facts label? Food labels tell you a lot about what’s in the foods you choose to eat. But they can be hard to decipher. Follow these simple steps to help you make the best food choices for what your body needs.

Step 1: What’s the serving size?
One of the most important pieces of information is also the most ignored! How many times have you eaten an entire package, thinking it’s one serving, just to turn it around and see that it’s actually two servings! That means you have to double all the numbers on the label. Instead of 150 calories, you ate 300. Instead of 7 grams of fat, you ate 14, and so on. Always check the serving size before portioning out your food.

Step 2: How many calories?
This section is helpful to look at if you are working on losing, gaining or maintaining weight. “Calories” listed on the left side are the number of calories for one serving. “Calories from Fat” tell you how many calories come from the fat in the food for one serving. Balance how many calories you eat with how many calories your body uses to maintain weight. Eat more calories than you burn to gain and less calories than you burn to lose.

Step 3: Nutrients to Limit
Choose foods with lower numbers of the following nutrients: Total Fat, Saturated Fat, Trans Fat, Cholesterol, and Sodium. Eating too much of these nutrients may increase your risk for heart disease, some cancers, or high blood pressure.

Step 4: Get More of these Nutrients
Most Americans don’t get enough fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, and iron from the foods they eat. Eating more of these nutrients may improve your health and help reduce the risk for some diseases and health conditions.

Step 5: What are Percent (%) Daily Values?
The percentages listed on the right side of the label tell you whether the food gives you a lot or a little of that nutrient. Five percent (5%) or less gives you a “low” amount of that nutrient. Twenty percent (20%) or more gives you a “high” amount of those nutrients.

Do You Have to Choose Between Wine & Your Waistline?

Alcohol Weight Gain

When it comes to drinking alcohol and your health, thousands of experts have weighed in. One thing that they can all agree on is that when it comes to drinking alcohol and your weight, moderation is key.

A recent article on CNN.com shed some light on the fact that alcohol not only adds hundreds of calories to your diet – a regular beer can add up to more than 150 calories while a glass of wine can cost you 100 calories – but it also temporarily halts your body’s ability to burn fat. So, while the beer you had with pizza and wings might not be a major caloric offender, your body insists on breaking down the calories from the alcohol first, leaving the calories from what you ate to get stored as fat.

So, does this mean that you must resign yourself to teetotaling? No, says Meagan Moyer, registered dietician for the Emory Bariatric Center. But you do need to follow a few rules to keep from growing a beer belly or wine waist!

  1. Keep it simple – A good rule of thumb is the fewer ingredients the better. It’s generally safer to go with a glass of wine or a beer rather than a fancy mixed drink that is loaded with sugar or salt from added juices, soda and mixers.
  2. Eat before you drink – It might sound counterintuitive if you’re trying to skimp on calories, but eating a snack or meal with healthy fat, fiber and protein can help stave off the sugar crash that often comes after a night of drinking. It also can help you feel full so that you’re not picking off of every tray being passed.
  3. Keep count – Conventional wisdom points to the one drink a night rule for women. So, does this mean you can abstain all week and then blow it out on Saturday? Not so fast. Drinking several drinks in one night will mess with your blood sugar, add hundreds of calories to your diet and decrease your judgment in making good food choices – a trifecta of disaster for your waistline.

Author: Meagan Moyer, RD/LD, Emory Bariatric Center

 

 

Nutrition Fact or Fiction? Emory Bariatric Center Dietician Sheds Light on the Most Important Meal of the Day

Nutrition Fact or FictionWhen it comes to losing weight, exercising and eating healthy, myths and misconceptions abound. And, with an overabundance of conflicting diet and weight loss information available, it’s hard to know if your breakfast routine is keeping you on target for your weight loss goals or if you’re  unknowingly derailing your path to healthy living.  Is it best to work out in the morning or at night? Can a doughnut really be better for breakfast than a muffin? Fortunately, Meagan Moyer, a registered dietician with the Emory Bariatric Center, can help distinguish diet and exercise myths from the truth to help you get your day off to a great start.

Check out Meagan playing a friendly game of nutrition fact or fiction with 11Alive’s morning news team.

Related Resources:

6 Healthy Eating Tips To Stave Off Holiday Weight Gain

Tips to Keep Holiday Weight Gain Off

As the year comes to an end, so often do the thoughts of healthy eating habits.   the thought of keeping the pounds off during the holidays.  With multiple holiday parties throughout December, it may seem hard to keep the weight off, but preparation is the key to success.

1) Have a Plan
Plan to succeed or plan to fail. Plan accordingly if you know you are going to be limited on the foods you can eat at holiday parties. Bring some healthy snacks to eat at the party or eat a light meal before going to curb your appetite. Sample the foods at the party, rather than eat a plateful of each dish. If it is a party where you bring a dish, bring something that you know you can eat and enjoy. Vegetables and low fat dip are always a good option to add color to the table.

2) Everything in Moderation
There is no need to avoid your favorite holiday foods if you eat them in moderation. Portion sizes are important in weight management and weight loss. Controlling portions allows you to eat the foods you like without depriving yourself. Take one serving of the food you want to eat and walk away from the table. It is more satisfying to eat smaller portions of a variety of foods than a big portion of one food.

3) Exercise
Keep moving to stay warm as well as burn off those holiday calories. Walking 30 minutes a day, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, and doing some light weight resistance training can help keep you on track with your weight loss goals.

4) Drink Right, Feel Right
Drink plenty of water to keep hydrated. Drinking water can make you feel fuller and help prevent overeating. Avoid alcoholic beverages since they add extra calories and sugar. If you do chose to drink alcoholic beverages, drink wine, light beer or spirits with no-calories mixers.

5) When in Doubt, Fruit and Veggie It Out
Include fruits and vegetables at every meal. Snack on vegetables or fruits throughout the day instead of the holidays goodies at work. Not only are fruits/veggies low in calories, they are high in antioxidants, giving you extra immunity during the cold winter months.

6) Forgive Yourself and Move On
Don’t let the thought of overindulging at Thanksgiving keep you from moving forward in your weight loss goals during the rest of the holiday season and into the new year. Take every day as a new day and a fresh opportunity to get closer to your goal.

Diet Frustrations? 5 Reasons You Aren’t Losing Weight

5 reasonsLosing weight is hard and can be very frustrating at times.  Here are some common pitfalls that people make and suggestions on how to get over them.

  1. You think fat-free also means calorie-free – When a food claims to be fat-free, sugar-free, or light, it doesn’t mean the food is low in calories or even healthy.  Eating these foods often lead people to think they can eat more!  How many times have you thought, “These cookies are low-fat, which means I can eat more.”?  Always check to see how many calories there are in one serving before you begin eating to avoid any unwanted surprises.
  2. You’re not being truthful to yourself – No one saw you eat that handful of potato chips, so it doesn’t count, right?  Accountability is a big part of weight loss, and it’s a lot harder to be accountable to ourselves than to other people.  Many people find using food diary websites or Smartphone apps to log their food intake as a great way to stay accountable.  Try using My Fitness Pal or Lose It!
  3. You are skipping breakfast to save calories – People who skip breakfast actually eat more!  Eating breakfast kick-starts your metabolism for the rest of the day.  Eating only one or two large meals at the end of the day is like throwing wood into a fire that has no flame.   Eat something within one hour of waking up.  If you are not a breakfast person, try having a meal replacement shake or smoothie, which are not as heavy on the stomach.
  4. You think you can’t exercise Anything that raises your heart rate counts as exercise.  Think about what kind of physical activity you enjoy doing — you are much more likely to stick to it if you like it.  For those that are short on time, exercise is cumulative.  You don’t need to exercise for long periods of time to see the benefits.  And most importantly, remember that some exercise is always better than none at all.
  5. You are expecting perfection – We all know that no one is perfect.  But for some reason, we expect ourselves to be perfect when it comes to losing weight.  We get angry with ourselves for “falling off the wagon”.  Learn to forgive yourself.  Remember that we don’t have to hit a home run; we just need to get on base.

 

Smart & Simple Snacks

Simple SnacksDid you know that consuming small snacks in between meals instead of simply eating three big meals per day can increase your metabolism and your curb hunger? Over the years, many Americans have adapted this eating style, but unfortunately, many of these snacks are often high in calories, high in fat, and high in sodium. Between 1977-78, the average daily caloric intake of Americans was 1,803 kcals. This figure rose to 2,374 kcals between 2003-06 due to several factors, one being poor snack choices. So what are some healthy snacks that taste great and will keep me satisfied? Glad you asked. The following are 3 smart and simple snack ideas that everyone in your family will enjoy.

Ah Nuts!
Nuts are a part of a group of foods often referred to as “healthy fats” due to their high monounsaturated fat content, which includes heart healthy omege-3. Nuts are also a good source of protein, fiber, vitamin E, and plant sterols. The dietary recommendation for nuts is equal to one ounce or one handful per day. Nuts make a great snack choice when on the go.

Carrots & Celery
Carrots and celery make great snacks that are not only healthy, but also easy to prepare. These family friendly vegetables are not only good sources of fiber but are also packed with several vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C. Next time you are in the mood for a yummy and filling snack, try dipping a celery or carrot stick in your favorite all natural nut butter and enjoy.

Cheerios & Raisins
Did you know that Cheerios may help lower your cholesterol? Did you know that 1 cup of Cheerios is also an excellent source of fiber, which helps to increase satiety? Not only is Cheerios a healthy and delicious breakfast cereal, but it can also be eaten as a yummy snack too. For some added anti-oxidants, combine Cheerios with one small box of raisins or a small handful of dried cranberries.

Snacks should not only be nutritious and delicious, but also should be easy and on the go available. One suggestion is to make your snacks at the beginning of the day or the night before. Then you will be already when it is time for your smart and simple snack.

Exercise: A Sometimes Forgotten Key to Weight Management

Exercise Fitness Weight LossIn today’s market of many different diet plans, it is easy to forget about the role of exercise in managing one’s weight. After all, counting the calories used up during an hour on the treadmill or at the gym can be a bit depressing when one realizes that those calories amount to only one-seventh of a pound and are completely reversed if one eats a nice piece of pie as a reward for doing all that exercising. Indeed, one only burns about one M&M candy’s worth of calories in 50 yards of walking. This has led some to suggest that exercise is not that important in weight management and that people should focus their attention on eating less and not worry too much about exercise.

However, there are other data that would argue against ignoring exercise as an important component of weight control. If one thinks historically about the nearly tripling of our nation’s obesity rate in the last generation or two, much of that has happened with reduced exercise. As we have moved away from an agrarian economy to one based on information, more and more people have desk jobs and there is no need for almost anyone to burn many calories to survive. Cities in which people walk a lot, such as New York, have a significantly lower obesity rate than the nation as a whole, and the state with the lowest obesity rate is Colorado, which is famous for outdoor activities such as hiking and skiing.

If one takes a long-term view, there is good reason to expect that exercise can help a lot with weight, aside from its many benefits for general health. After all, if you weigh 175 pounds, increasing walking by a half-hour a day at a moderate pace translates into an extra weight loss of about 25 pounds per year, and even a 10-minute daily increase is worth about 8 additional pounds off per year. It is much more important to develop an exercise/activity plan you can stick with that is very feasible and moderate than to “go like crazy” once in awhile to lose as much weight as possible. Just as in the famous fairy tale, the tortoise, known for persistence and continuous plodding ahead, beats the hare, known for jump starts and sprinting ahead at an unsustainable pace.

Given that maintenance of exercise is a key, we all might keep in mind some factors that help us stick with a behavior:

  1. Make it fun. We are much more likely to walk or do anything else if we enjoy it. Many people will walk a considerable distance with a friend, for example, while considering walking on a treadmill to be drudgery, particularly if there is not something to watch while walking, such as a movie or television show.
  2. Make it regular and structured. If we get ourselves into a routine, it often can be maintained. Consider setting regular times to exercise, whether they be gym visits, walking during the lunch hour, or arrangements with friends to exercise together.
  3. Make exercise feasible and reasonable, even if it seems to be a small increase. Make sure you exercise within your medical limitations.
  4. Think of things you can do on a daily basis to increase your exercise. Examples might be to park further away from stores, have a policy to use the second-closest rest room, take stairs at work rather than the elevator, and/or walk while talking on the phone.
  5. Use the three principles of behavior change to help you maintain exercise. Keep track of what you are doing, set goals regularly, and set up a support system which will cheer you on and encourage you to continue.

Do you have other tips? Share them with me and our readers in the comments below!

Author: Stanley L. Chapman, PhD – Emory Bariatric Center

Makeover your Exercise Routine for Maximum Fat Loss

Meagan Mohammadione, RD/LD Emory Bariatric CenterIt is well known that when you reduce your calorie intake, you will lose even more weight if you exercise too.  More exercise is always better than some and some is better than none at all.  But what does more mean?  How much do we really need to exercise to lose weight and improve our health?  A 2009 study found that people who did 225-420 minutes a week of moderately vigorous exercise lost the greatest amount of weight.  This same study also found that exercise is the best way to keep weight off that you have already lost.  People who were able to maintain their weight loss, exercised for 150-250 minutes a week.

So we now know how much time to devote to exercise, but what kind of exercise should we do?  The short answer is any exercise that you enjoy so that you keep doing it.  For the long answer, let’s take a look at this Ultimate Metabolic and Calorie Burning Makeover, adapted from a recent lecture by exercise expert, Len Kravitz, PhD.

Importance of Warming-Up Before Working Out

Warming up for 5-10 minutes before your workout increases blood flow to your muscles for better performance.  It also gets your carbohydrate and fat enzymes going.  Translation: you will burn more calories and fat during your workout if you warm up first!

Cardiovascular Calorie Burn

After your warm-up, increase the intensity by 10-15 percent (this can mean going faster, increasing incline, etc.) and continue for 4 minutes.  Increase your intensity again by 10-15 percent for 4 minutes.  Continue this pattern until you have reached your moderately vigorous intensity level.  Maintain this for as long as you feel comfortable.  Then decrease the intensity by 10-15 percent for 4 minutes, and again another decrease for 4 minutes until you reach your original intensity level.

Weight Training Burns Fat!

It was once thought that weight training was only good for strengthening and building muscle.  Turns out we also burn fat during weight training and up to 2 hours after our workout is finished!  Try this regimen: Do 3 sets of 10 repetitions (lifts) at 85% of the maximum amount of weight you can lift.  Rest for only 90 second between sets.

References:

Donnelly, JE. Appropriate physical activity intervention strategies for weight loss and prevention of weight regain in adults. J Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2009, vol. 41, 459-469.

Herrera, L and Kravitz, L. Yes! You do burn fat during resistance exercise. IDEA Fitness J. 2009, vol. 6, 17-19.