Posts Tagged ‘medically supervised diet’

Time to Lose the Weight, “Your Weigh”

Non-Surgical Weight Loss Your WeighLosing weight is something that seems to be high on the list of to-dos of most American adults. Whether you set a New Years resolution each year, or find yourself trying one diet after another, the ultimate goal is to lose weight and keep it off. Many of us don’t have enough weight to lose to justify weight loss surgery, but are looking for a long term solution. While diets can work for some people, most popular diets assume that everyone is overweight for the same reasons and can lose weight following the same plan. From years of experience, we know that this is not true. That’s why we’ve launched the Your Weigh program, which gives you the opportunity to work with a team of medical professionals to construct a tailored weight loss program that works for you.

Here are some real-world examples of how our different meal and weight loss plans have met the unique weight loss needs of our patients:

Elizabeth W. is a 54 year old woman who was recently diagnosed with diabetes by her doctor. She saw the diagnosis as a “wake up call” for her to start taking care of herself and her weight-related issues. Elizabeth knew that she needed to lose weight quickly, but also wanted to learn about how to eat healthy to help keep her blood sugar in control. When Elizabeth enrolled in Your Weigh, she met with a Registered Dietitian who suggested that she follow the partial meal replacement meal plan. In this plan, Elizabeth will use meal replacements in addition to healthy food choices that she prepares at home. This choice was best for her because it will ensure significant weight loss while practicing balanced meal planning and eating correct portion sizes of “regular” food.

Tony S. is a 33 year old man who started losing weight on his own by trying to eat better and exercising. Tony was losing a little weight, but not as much as he had hoped. Tony really liked working out, but needed help with food choices. He knew that his eating habits were keeping him from reaching his goals. When Tony signed up for the Your Weigh program he chose the full food meal plan, which consists of three balanced meals and two snacks throughout the day. Tony did very well on this plan and actually found that he had more energy for his workouts because he was eating more frequently. Tony has since reached his goal weight and continues to eat frequent, balanced meals and exercise to maintain his weight loss.

Christine H. is a 41 year old woman who has been on many diets in her lifetime. She feels like she has “tried them all”. She chose to follow the full meal replacement program because she wants to have a “temporary break from food.” After 12 weeks of eating only meal replacements, she is now aware of just how much food her body needs and uses that knowledge when she begins to eat food again. Christine continues to come to the clinic for on-going support, which she knows is the key to maintaining her weight loss.

For more information on our Your Weigh medical weight loss program, you can visit our Emory Bariatric Center site. If you have questions about our Your Weigh weight loss program, you can ask them using the comments section below.

The Costs of Being Overweight

We know that being overweight or obese can have a significant impact on our physical and emotional health. But, did you know that being overweight can also carry a financial price tag?

The Department of Health Policy at The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Policy recently released a research report entitled “A Heavy Burden: The Individual Costs of Being Overweight and Obese in the United States.” The report, which tallied the annual, incremental costs of overweight and obesity from the individual perspective,  found that the annual overall costs of being obese are  $4,879 for an obese woman and $2,646 for an obese man. This includes medical costs, lost wages, higher work-related costs, and higher costs associated with the purchase of personal goods. For overweight women and men, the incremental annual costs are $524 and $432 respectively.

The report found that the main cost driver for those who are overweight are direct medical costs -  health care costs for an overweight person are $346 higher per year than the health care costs for a normal-weight person. However, lost wages is the main cost driver for obese women.

Today, two out of three Americans are obese or overweight.  If the current trajectory continues, one in two adults will be obese by 2030.

Viewed in this light, participating in a weight loss program can have significant health and financial benefits. When considering the costs of a weight loss program – such as bariatric surgery or a medically-supervised diet – factor in the impact of these programs in reducing your weight as well as the direct costs of being overweight.