Posts Tagged ‘healthy cooking’

Savor the Flavor during National Nutrition Month

salt-sugar250x250March is National Nutrition Month® and the theme this year is “Savor the Flavor of Eating Right.” Flavor is a big part of why we choose to eat the foods that we do. We want the food that we eat to be flavorful, but at the same time it’s important that the food we eat is healthy.

Foods are often flavored with salt, sugar or fat. The 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans advises us to consume less added sugars, saturated fat, trans fat and sodium (commonly referred to as salt). It’s important to remember that we don’t need to limit natural sugar, which is found in fresh fruit and dairy products, but we should limit sugar that is added to products.

Salt, sugar and fat don’t have to be avoided completely, but it’s best to eat them in moderation or choose healthier alternatives. So how can we reduce the amount of salt, sugar and fat in the foods we are eating?

Instead of salt, try:
• Dried or fresh herbs like basil, oregano, cilantro or parsley
• Spices like cumin, pepper, chili powder, dill or curry powder

Watch out for high levels of salt in:
• Frozen meals and side dishes
• Canned items (soups, vegetables, sauces, etc.)

To reduce sugar buy:
• Frozen fruit that does not contain added sugar
• Canned fruit that has been packed in water or juice, not syrup

To tell if sugar has been added to a product, look for these words on the ingredient list:
• Corn syrup, brown sugar, cane sugar, honey, malt syrup, nectars, maple syrup or molasses

For a list of more added sugars, visit: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/added-sugars

Choose healthier fats:
• Look for unsaturated fats (olive oil, corn oil, peanut oil and soybean oil), which are liquid at room temperature

Limit fats that are not as healthy:
• Saturated fats, which are typically solid or closer to solid at room temperature and include butter, cream and lard
• Trans fats which are often found in baked goods and snacks

For more information visit the following websites:

Choosing Foods & Beverages
Dietary Guidelines
Helpful Nutrition Tips
2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines

Tips for Healthy Grocery Shopping Success

healthy-groceries250x250Have you ever left the grocery store with more food than you intended to buy? Has that extra food ended up being chips, cookies, or sugar-sweetened sodas? It’s easy to feel tempted by the products the store has on display. Keep in mind that the main goal of many stores is to advertise cheap and appealing products rather than healthy and nutritious ones. In order to help you maintain your healthy eating goals, follow these tips for grocery shopping success.

Before beginning your trip, make a list of items to buy. This will prevent purchasing unnecessary food. It may also help to eat a meal or snack at home before heading to the store. Shopping on an empty stomach makes it more tempting to purchase unhealthy junk food. If you do end up at the store while you are hungry, head straight for the produce section. Choosing your fruits and vegetables first will help keep your mind on track to shop healthy.

Often, companies advertise foods as healthy when in reality, they might not be the best for our bodies. For example, some cereals are advertised as “made with whole grains.” Although whole grains are a healthy choice, many of these cereals contain 10-15 grams of added sugars per serving. In order to understand the ingredients in your food, try looking at Nutrition Facts Labels. The goal is to keep total fat, sodium, and sugar as low as possible.

In order to help you keep MyPlate in mind while grocery shopping, follow these tips:

  • Fruits and vegetables
    • Purchase fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables. When buying canned products, look for “no salt added” vegetables. Fruit should be canned in juice rather than syrup.
  • Dairy
    • Look for low fat or fat free dairy options. You can also try an alternative dairy product, such as unsweetened almond milk or unsweetened soy milk.
    • Many brands of yogurt add extra fat and sugar. In order to avoid this, try plain fat-free Greek yogurt and add fresh berries and nuts or granola for flavor.
  • Protein
    • Canned or dried legumes are a great source of protein and fiber, keeping you full longer. Legumes, such as black beans, pinto beans, and black eyed peas are easy to add to soups and saladS.
    • When shopping for meat, choose leaner meats such as fish and chicken. If you do purchase red meat, look for 90% or greater lean products.
  • Grains
    • According to the Dietary Guidelines for America, half of your grains should be whole. Search for whole grains, such as 100% whole wheat products, corn, oatmeal, popcorn, brown rice, and whole barley.

For more information about healthy grocery shopping, visit these websites:
http://www.nutrition.gov/shopping-cooking-meal-planning/food-shopping-and-meal-planning/build-healthy-diet-smart-shopping
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/wecan/eat-right/smart-food-shopping.htm

Healthy Eating Substitutions During the Holidays

Winter months are a time when food becomes the center of attention: Christmas, Chanukah, and New Years. Food weighs heavy on everyone’s mind, and unfortunately many times it ends up weighing heavy on our stomachs. We want to serve the dish that keeps everyone coming back for seconds. Unfortunately, these seasonal dishes tend to be high in sugar, fat, and salt if we aren’t mindful while we cook. But did you know that with the right resources, we can “revive” our recipes from the “nutrition grave”? Swapping some of the les
s healthy ingredients for more nutritious options can cut back on calories, fat, sodium, and sugar, all while maintaining that same tasty flavor.

Many of our favorite holiday dishes are “empty calories,” meaning they are high in calories and low in nutrients. However, there are simple food substitutes that can bring our favorite dishes back from the “nutrition grave.” For example, did you know you can use applesauce in place of butter in baked goods? This is a great alternative for desserts because it reduces the fat content while adding natural sweetness. Mashed bananas or avocado can also be alternatives to butter when baking. Sneaking whole grains into your meals is easy during the holidays as well. Try adding quinoa to your Christmas stuffing, or serving mashed cauliflower instead of mashed potatoes. The table below lists more simple and easy cooking swaps to increase the nutrient value of your meals.

bariatrics holiday eating

Making just a few small substitutions can make a big difference. We challenge you to make just one healthy cooking swap this holiday season. This will get you ready for the new year and beyond.

For more information or questions about weight loss services offered at Emory Healthcare, call 404-778-7777 or visit http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/emorybariatrics/.