weight loss

Your Path 2 Health – A New Addition to Emory Bariatric Center’s Non-Surgical Weight Loss Program

healthy-walkers-withdog (1)The Emory Bariatric Center has added a new offering to their non-surgical weight loss program. Offering non-surgical weight loss options are ideal for patients who have smaller weight loss goals in mind or those that are not appropriate candidates for weight loss surgery.

Path 2 Health is a 6 month program that provides you with the tools needed to hone in on your ideal body weight and optimize your health. So you may be wondering, how is Path 2 Health different from other weight loss programs? As a Path 2 Health participant, you will gain knowledge and support from our expert team of doctors, psychologists, nurses, and dietitians, as well as from fellow participants. We understand life is busy and sticking to a healthy lifestyle can be a challenge. Path 2 Health offers you support every week during your 6 month program, and includes monthly group visits. “Virtual” visits will also occur once per month allowing you to participate from your home. These virtual visits are online education webinars led by our dietitians or psychologists. You may log in to the webinars or watch them later when it is convenient for you. Participants will also be supported by our dietitians through bi-monthly phone check-ins.

Path 2 Health encourages you to eat real nutritious foods. We provide you healthy eating instructions and sample meals at your first appointment. Throughout your program, we will teach you to improve your eating habits, lose weight, and better your health.

“Real, unprocessed foods have more nutrients that our bodies need, and less of what our bodies don’t. Real foods are less likely to have added fat, sugar, salt and chemical preservatives than processed foods.”, explains Meagan Moyer, MPH, RD, LD, Emory Bariatric Center dietitian.

Path 2 Health not only focuses on nutrition, but also on behavior change. Our licensed psychologist will help you understand how your daily behaviors affect your health, eating habits, stress, emotions, and exercise habits. “All of us have the capacity to make healthy changes in our lives provided we have the structure, support and knowledge to effect these changes. The team at Emory Bariatrics creates the structure, provides the support and imposes the education to facilitate growth and change.”, says Dr. Pegah Moghaddam, Emory Bariatric Center psychologist.

Path 2 Health is intended to not only help you reach your weight loss goals, but to provide you with the tools and knowledge to maintain weight loss long term and live a longer, healthier life.

For more information about the Path 2 Health program offered by the Emory Bariatric Center, call 404-778-7777 or visit emoryhealthcare.org/emorybariatrics.

Required Supplementation Following Bariatric Surgery

protein-shakes (1)Bariatric surgery is a major event in a patient’s weight-loss journey, but the event is best seen as a new beginning. Surgery with good aftercare and moderate lifestyle changes can give wonderful long-term results for health and weight. One of the requirements after surgery includes the need for lifelong daily supplements. Lifelong supplements are required to prevent nutrient deficiencies.

The need for supplementation arises from the following:

  1. The bariatric procedure is restricting how much you are able to consume. This restriction results in an inability to consume all the necessary nutrients via your food.
  2. The bariatric procedure may be malabsorptive. This means that even though you are consuming nutritious food, your body’s ability to absorb all the nutrients is inhibited.
  3. A combination of the two above.

There are several supplements required and many others that may be recommended. Typically, the required nutrients are:

  • B-12: must be in one of these forms – sublingual (under the tongue), intramuscular (a shot) or intranasal (spray into the nostrils).
  • Calcium: must be in the citrate form.
  • Complete multivitamin/mineral supplement with iron: usually two per day. If your supplement does not contain iron, you must take separate iron.
  • Protein shakes: whey protein isolate is best absorbed/utilized by the body. This is generally temporary for 2-6 weeks after surgery, depending on physician.

This list includes the typical required nutrients, however, your physician or dietitian may direct you to take additional supplements and/or decrease the amount of a supplement.

The important thing to remember about supplementation is that it is required for life. You run the risk of deficiency and its related side-effects if you quit supplementing. Your surgeon will monitor your lab work, which is why your annual follow-up visits are vital.

Life after bariatric surgery is not all easy, but strong planning, appropriate education, and determination can help as you make this journey.

For more information about bariatric surgery offered at Emory Bariatrics, call 404-778-7777 or visit emoryhealthcare.org/emorybariatrics.

Emory Bariatric Center Patient Named 2015 OPTIFAST® New You Weight Loss Winner

tawnismallThe Emory Bariatric Center of Emory University Hospital Midtown is proud to have one of its own patients selected as a winner of the 2015 OPTIFAST® New You weight loss contest. The New You weight loss contest is designed to recognize OPTIFAST patients for their pursuit of and dedication to long-term weight management. Contest winners are living proof that lifestyle changes – mindful eating and physical activity – can help achieve a better quality of life.

The selected Emory Bariatric Center patient is Tawni Taylor from Atlanta, GA. Just less than a year ago, Tawni’s 5’3” frame carried 324 pounds. A walk up three steps of stairs left her breathless. Thirty years of not making the right choices in terms of her dietary and physical fitness habits had finally caught up with her, and she was ready to get on the right path.

On September 26, 2014, Tawni made a commitment to herself to lose weight and enrolled in the OPTIFAST program at the Emory Bariatric Center.

Today at 180 pounds, her whole mindset around food, physical activity and overall well-being has changed. It’s difficult for Tawni to imagine a life where mindful eating and exercise is not routine.

Tawni’s commitment to herself came to life as she went from a size 24/26 to the size 10 she wears today. With every 5% body weight loss, OPTIFAST patients receive different colored wristbands donned with words of inspiration. She cherishes one in particular, inked with ‘PERSEVERANCE,’ – a word that defines her ongoing journey, a symbol of her courage and lifelong commitment to a healthy lifestyle.

In her own words, “it takes an OPTIFAST village.” Tawni attributes the success of her ongoing journey to the endless compassion and support of her medical team at the Emory Bariatric Center and fellow OPTIFAST program patients, who inspired her every step of the way.

“OPTIFAST has reset my mind and put me back on the right path. It can change your life – it truly can.”, says Tawni.

Winners of the 2015 New You weight loss contest winners celebrated with an all-expense paid trip to New York City. The weekend of rest, relaxation and rejuvenation included a spa day, makeover and night out on the town with a loved one.

For more information about Emory Bariatric Center’s OPTIFAST program, call 404-778-7777 or visit emoryhealthcare.org/bariatrics.

Takeaways from Emory Bariatrics’ Successful & Lasting Weight Loss Live Chat

successful-weight-loss-cilThank you to everyone who joined us on Tuesday, August 11th, for our live online chat on “Successful & Lasting Weight Loss: Strategies for Reaching Your Goals”, hosted by Emory Bariatrics registered dieticians, Megan Moyer, RD, and Kasey LaPointe, RD.

For the millions of Americans who diet, stop dieting and then promise to diet again, the constant struggle to lose weight and keep it off can be exhausting, not to mention discouraging. During this live chat, Megan and Kasey discussed strategies for long term weight loss success. They offered healthful living tips to get you on the path to lasting weight loss and provided successful strategies to help make this time the one that leads to a healthier, happier lifestyle. Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What’s the best way to keep on track: daily weigh-ins? listening to tapes?

Meagan Moyer, RD: The best way to stay on track really depends on the person. Some people choose to weigh themselves everyday, but that can take a mental toll if they beat themselves up every time they step on the scale. That’s why I recommend not weighing yourself more than once a week. It’s also helpful to have a person you can call when you need support and in moments of “weakness.” Some people also choose to track what they eat using a website or app.

Question: Does eating before bedtime make you gain weight? What time should I stop?

Meagan Moyer, RD and Kasey LaPointe, RD: It’s a misconception that the metabolism stops at a certain time during the night. Usually the problem lies more with eating later in the night after your calories have been consumed for the day. Late night eating can be out of boredom or habit. One thing I suggest is asking yourself the reason you are eating, whether it’s out of boredom or actual hunger. Try to occupy your time with something else to keep you from snacking late at night. I keep a crossword puzzle next to my bed if I feel my mind wandering towards hunger.

Question: After months of steady weight loss, I feel like I might be at a plateau. My weight loss has been incredibly slow for the past few months. Any suggestions on how to adjust my diet to see better results?

Meagan Moyer, RD and Kasey LaPointe, RD: Reaching a plateau is completely normal when it comes to weight loss. The body gets used to your behaviors and habits, so it’s good to adjust your routine and diet. Try incorporating new activities into your work outs in order to continue to see results.

Also, while you may reach a plateau when it comes to the scale, the body often continues to change in other ways. Try to focus on other non-scale victories to measure your weight loss success. You can focus on how your clothes fit, seeing a decrease in inches using a tape measure, having more energy, sleeping better and other noticeable changes is a good way to measure your success.

Question: How do I know if I’m a candidate for Bariatric surgery?

Kasey LaPointe, RD: If your body mass index is greater than 40 or if your body mass index is greater than 35 and you have weight related health issues, you are a candidate for bariatric surgery. You also have to be ready to commit to a lifelong healthy lifestyle and be mentally prepared for these changes.

If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript. You can also visit emoryhealthcare.org/emorybariatrics for more information.

Also, if you have additional questions for our registered dieticians, Megan Moyer, RD, and Kasey LaPointe, RD, please feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

Bariatric Surgery: What are the Differences in Surgical Options?

bariatric-appleLosing weight with diet and exercise can work for many individuals. However, for some, diet and exercise may not be enough causing individuals to be at high risk for disease-related complications due to obesity. In these cases, weight loss surgery may be an option.

The decision to have weight loss surgery should never be taken lightly. Contrary to popular belief, it is not “the easy way out” and won’t instantly cure the emotional and physical issues which lead one down the path to obesity.

Emory Bariatrics performs three types of weight loss surgery. Below is a brief description of each type offered.

  •  Roux-en-Y, also know as “gastric bypass”, is a combination procedure. It is a restrictive procedure and a malabsorptive procedure. The surgery reduces the size of your stomach, therefore limiting the amount of food you can eat at one time. A malabsorptive procedure means your intestines are rerouted so that your body does not absorb as much nutrients from food. Lifelong vitamin and mineral supplements must be taken to avoid deficiencies.
  • Sleeve gastrectomy, also known as “sleeve”, is a restrictive procedure. About 80% of your stomach is removed, leaving a tube-like pouch that resembles a banana. The stomach and intestines are not rearranged, but since you are eating less, there may be vitamin & mineral deficiencies if the recommended supplements are not taken throughout life.
  • Adjustable gastric banding or “band” is a restrictive procedure. An inflatable band is placed around the upper portion of the stomach, therefore making you feel full on less food. Tubing connects the band to a port under the skin, and the band is inflated or deflated using a needle, as needed. You may have to visit your physician’s office several times for as long as you have the band. Vitamins & minerals must also be taken when you have the band to prevent malabsorptive issues.

All three procedures have pros and cons. Your doctor will recommend a procedure based on many things such as your medical history, your weight, and past surgeries. The most important thing to remember is that weight loss surgery will help you lose weight, but maintaining this loss for years to come is up to you. Weight loss surgery is a tool. Making healthy food choices and exercising regularly are essential to maintaining weight loss. If behavior changes are not embraced, weight loss is not guaranteed. Attending support groups and seeing a psychologist or mental health counselor will help you with these behavioral changes. Remember, it is a “journey”, not a sprint.

For more information about bariatric surgery options offered at Emory Bariatrics, call 404-778-7777 or visit emoryhealthcare.org/emorybariatrics.

Recommended readings:

  • “Weight Loss Surgery for Dummies” by Mariana S. Kurian, Barbara Thompson and Brian K. Davidson
  • “The Emotional First Aid Kit – A Practical Guide to Life After Bariatric Surgery” by Cynthia L. Alexander, PsyD
  • “Eat It Up! by Connie Stapleton
  • “Emotional Eating Toolbox” by Melissa McCreery, Ph.D
  • “Dying to Change” by Katie Jay
  • “Eating Well After Weight Loss Surgery Cookbook” by Patt Levine, Michele Bontmpo-Saray, William B. Inabnet and Meredith Urban-Skuros

The Gluten Free Diet: Is It for Me?

Gluten FreeThere has been a lot of hype around “gluten-free” diets in recent years. While thousands tout the benefits of going gluten-free, many people aren’t exactly sure what it is or if it’s the right diet for them. If you’re unsure of what “gluten-free” really means or if you should give it a try, here’s a quick and dirty rundown of things you should know:

  • The first thing you should know is that a gluten-free diet is used to treat celiac disease.
  • So what is celiac disease? Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the small intestine is sensitive to the protein gluten, often found in wheat, rye and barley.
  • What are the symptoms of celiac disease? It’s a digestive disease, and symptoms include abdominal bloating and pain, chronic diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, iron-deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, missed menstrual periods and numbness in the hands and feet.1
  • How does an allergy cause such a wide array of symptoms? The effect of celiac disease is twofold. First, when gluten is ingested by a person with celiac disease, it can damage the lining of the small intestine, causing uncomfortable digestive symptoms. Secondly, due to the damage of the small intestines, crucial vitamins and minerals don’t get absorbed properly, leading to malnutrition and long-term negative health effects.
  • How do I know if I have it? Celiac disease is genetic, so if anyone in your family has tested positive, it’s probably a good idea for you to get checked, too. The disease can occur at any age, and affects people in all parts o f the world. You can get tested for celiac disease with a simple blood test. People with the disease will probably have higher levels of certain autoantibodies that your doctor will be able to identify.
  • What if I don’t have celiac disease? Can I still do a gluten free diet? Gluten free diets are only necessary for individuals with celiac disease or a wheat allergy. Before going gluten free, take a closer look at your diet- Is your diet balanced? Are you eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, legumes/beans, nuts/seeds, whole grains, and lean meat/low fat dairy? Often, when someone goes from a diet high in processed foods to “gluten free” they end up increasing other foods groups. This increase in fruits, vegetables, legumes/beans, nuts/seeds which may actually be reliving the symptoms, not the avoidance of gluten. If you’re not convinced, make any appointment with your gastroenterologist and discuss how to determine food allergies or sensitivities.
  • Will eating gluten-free help me lose weight? Not necessarily. Don’t fall prey to the idea that “gluten-free” equals “healthy” or “low-fat.” Some processed gluten-free foods are low in fiber so you won’t stay full as long, and they’re often stripped of important nutritional elements. In one case study, the vast majority of participants that adhered to a gluten-free diet gained significant weight.3 And since gluten-free foods often carry a heftier price-tag, you might want to think twice about going free just for weight-loss’ sake.

Takeaways: The gluten-free diet is really only necessary for people who have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Don’t get sucked in to the mindset that gluten-free equals a healthier diet. If you want to improve your health choose a variety of fruits, vegetables, beans/legumes, nuts/seeds, lean meats, low fat dairy, and whole grains.

Related sources:


1. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) . http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/#1
2. Antonio Di Sabatino, Gino Roberto Corazza. “Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: Sense or Sensibility? Annals of Internal Medicine. 2012 Feb;156(4):309-311.
3. T. A. Kabbani, A. Goldberg, C. P. Kelly, K. Pallav, S. Tariq, A. Peer, J. Hansen, M. Dennis andD. A. Leffler. “Body mass index and the risk of obesity in coeliac disease treated with the gluten-free diet.” Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 35:.6; 625-744, March 2012.
4. Biesiekierski JR, Muir JG, Gibson PR. “Is gluten a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in people without celiac disease?” Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2013 Dec;13(6):631-8.

Four “Healthy” Foods That Sabotage Weight Loss

Multigrain BreadIf you’re trying to lose weight, it’s easy to fall into the trap of all of the “healthy” products food companies are pushing these days. Extra calories can be cleverly hidden in these products, sabotaging even the most well-intentioned consumer. The best way to manage or lose weight healthily is to control portion sizes and to eat a balanced diet consisting of lots of fresh or frozen fruits and veggies, lean proteins like chicken, fish, and beans, and low fat dairy. Do your best to avoid these sneaky “health” foods at your grocery store.

Fruited or flavored yogurt
The benefits of yogurt are plenty. It’s a good source of calcium, the live active cultures in yogurt help promote a healthy and happy digestive tract and it packs a protein punch (especially Greek yogurt). But this health food angel can often be a devil in disguise. Fruited or flavored yogurts are usually low fat or fat free, but can have as much as 31 grams of sugar in one six-ounce container! That’s almost eight teaspoons of sugar in your so-called “healthy” snack. Get all the benefits of yogurt without the extra sugar by buying plain, nonfat yogurt (Greek or regular) and adding your own fresh or frozen fruit.

Enhanced waters
Staying hydrated is important to maintaining a healthy weight, but getting the recommended eight glasses a day is difficult for some. Many people fight plain-water boredom by drinking enhanced waters like Vitaminwater. These are basically sugar water and a vitamin pill. If you eat a well-balanced diet filled with fruits, veggies, whole grains, and low fat dairy, you may be getting enough nutrients from food. Do your waistline a favor and drink plain , calorie-free tap, purified, or bottled water. Check out this previous blog post for ideas on making regular water taste delicious without the extra calories.

Fast food salads
Fast food chains want you to believe you really can eat healthy at their restaurants. Many have extensive salad offerings to reel in weight conscious consumers. But beware: the dressings, toppings, and add-ons for these salads can add as much as 500 extra calories to your healthy bowl of fresh veggies. What’s more, the nutritious parts of a salad, like tomatoes and cucumbers, are often used sparingly. If you find yourself with no other choice besides fast food, your best bet is a grilled chicken sandwich — hold the mayo — paired with a side salad. Don’t forget to use the dressing sparingly!

‘Multi-grain’ products
Whole grains are an important part of a balanced diet, giving us carbohydrates for energy and several key nutrients. But don’t confuse ‘multi-grain’ with whole grain. A whole grain product will contain all parts of the grain: the germ, the bran and the endosperm. Whole grains provide essential fatty acids, fiber,and B vitamins. Unfortunately, a lot of the grains in our food supply are refined. A refined grain has the germ and the bran removed, leaving the endosperm, which is mostly nutrient-poor starch. Refined grain flour is easy to work with in cookies, cakes, and breads, which makes it a cheap and versatile ingredient for food manufactures. A food company can claim their product is ‘multi-grain’ even if all of its grains are refined. The term implies nothing about the product’s nutritional value, and it could still have the same amount of calories and fat as any other cookie, cake or cracker out there. To make the right choice, look at the ingredients list on the package label. Look for the word “whole” before the grain listed, and make sure it’s one of the first two ingredients. Better yet, avoid packaged or processed foods and choose whole grains you can see: oats, brown rice, bulgur or quinoa.

Author: Courtney Plush, MS, Emory Healthcare Dietetic Intern

Attend a Cook’s Warehouse Class taught by an Emory Healthcare Registered Dietitian!

Meagan Moyer, RD/LD Emory Bariatric Center

Adapting a healthy lifestyle and enjoying tasty food can go hand-in-hand. Meagan Moyer, RD, LD, a Clinical Dietitian at the Emory Bariatric Center is here to show you how with solutions to your New Year’s resolutions!  Meagan will take crowd pleasing recipes and give them a makeover to cut out fat, calories and sodium without taking away any of the things that make them taste delicious.

Join her and find out how to:

  • Lower fat and calories without sacrificing flavor
  • “Sneak in” vegetables
  • Make your baked goods and desserts healthier

In addition to these tips and tricks, Meagan will also be passing out free recipe idea cards and Emory Healthcare measuring cups to take home with you! The class will be held January 15, 2014 from 7-9 pm at the Midtown location.  Visit www.cookswarehouse.com for more information and to register!

As it Turns Out, Apples May Keep More Than Just the Doctor Away

Apple a Day Keeps the Pounds AwayAmericans have a nasty habit of depriving ourselves when we want to drop pounds. We often believe that cutting calories is the secret to success, but we wind up just feeling hungry all the time. It may surprise you that one healthy alternative to the hopeless feeling of hunger is to actually add food to your diet. Evidence suggests that adding nutrient-dense, fiber-rich foods to your diet can actually help reduce your cravings. The secret? Fiber slows down the digestion of food, so you get a slow and steady source of glucose rather than ups and down in blood sugar levels.

Most Americans don’t get enough fiber. On average, we take in 15 grams a day of the 25 to 38 grams that are recommended, depending on your gender 1. So where do apples fit into all this? One apple with the skin on contains roughly 4.4 grams of fiber, about one fifth of your daily intake. Also, apples are rich in a very powerful kind of fiber called pectin, which is typically used as a gelling agent and stabilizer in food. It’s that stuff that they make jams and jellies out of. Pectin also is effective in delaying the emptying of the stomach by slowing the movement of food from your stomach into your small intestine, which works to discourage overeating and help you sustain that full feeling for a greater extent of time.

Still have your doubts? One study showed that substituting pectin for regular fiber doubled the time it took subjects’ stomachs to empty, keeping them full that much longer 2. In another study, scientists found that when participants ate an apple or a pear before meals they experienced weight loss 3. So, while it might seem counterintuitive, adding in those extra calories before meals can actually help you stay full for longer so that you resist those dangerous junk foods between meals!

But that’s not all. There is more to apples than just their awesome ability to keep us feeling full for longer. Apples provide many positive health benefits, specifically anti-cancer benefits. One report published in 2008 claimed that apple extracts and components have been shown to influence multiple mechanisms relevant for cancer prevention in in vitro studies. They also went on to say that epidemiological observations indicate that regular consumption of one or more apples a day may reduce the risk for lung and colon cancer 4.

Next time you’re looking around for something to eat, try grabbing an apple. By you’ve taken that last bite, you probably won’t be hungry anymore. You may just find that over time it helps you to become a slimmer, healthier you!

 Related Resources:

Slow & Steady Wins the Weight Loss Race

Along your weight loss path, how many times have you wished for a quick fix? While there’s no magic bullet, there are simple, steady steps you can take to meet your weight loss goal.

Joe Before & After Weight LossArvinpal Singh, MD, Medical Director of the Emory Bariatric Center, along with Joe, an Emory Bariatric Center patient on his own non-surgical weight loss journey, hosted an online chat discussing strategies for long term weight loss success. Dr. Singh and Joe answered questions on what it takes to get on the path to lasting weight loss and offered inspiration to help you reach your weight loss goals.

Joe and Dr. Singh fielded lots of great questions, ranging from inquiries on nonsurgical vs. surgical weight loss to those on fat fighting foods. Having already lost 115 pounds by making smart diet, exercise and lifestyle changes, Joe shared some of his best tips for successful weight loss.

You can find a few of the weight loss chat questions and answers below. For more, check out the full weight loss chat transcript!

Question:  “Is it better to exercise for a full 30 minute interval daily or to exercise a total of 30 minutes throughout the day?” – Deborah

Dr. Singh, Emory Bariatric Center

Answer (Dr. Singh): Excellent question! BOTH are equal, 10 minute increments 3 times a day has been shown to be just as effective as 30 minutes once a day. As a rule, every step you take counts. For example, park further away, take stairs and stay active in your daily. Also, try spending some time during your lunch break walking, etc.


Joe, Weight Loss PatientAnswer (Joe): To add to that, the key is making sure you’re upping your activity overall and upping the number of calories you’re burning. If doing that in two 15 minute intervals works better for you, that’s great, or 30 minutes at once is good too. Even small changes make a big impact and it’s important to be aware of little steps you can take to get extra activity in. I’ll try to walk to the water fountain that’s furthest away, as an example.

Question: “I’m 55 years old, diabetic, with blood pressure off the chart. How do I lose 90 lbs fast?” – Lynn

Dr. Singh, Emory Bariatric CenterAnswer (Dr. Singh): Hi Lynn, Losing the weight quickly is not necessarily as important as losing the weight in a healthy way. Without seeing you in person, I can’t speak your personal medical situation, but in general, eating the right amounts of the proper foods and making healthy lifestyle changes are the first steps. I can certainly go into more detail after looking into your personal medical history and discussing your case in detail with you.

Diseases of our western society (including heart disease, diabetes & cancers) are not a necessarily an inevitable part of the aging process. Many of these conditions are reversible and preventable with excellent nutrition and a healthy lifestyle.

Joe, Weight Loss PatientAnswer (Joe): Losing a certain number of pounds isn’t as important as it is to regain your overall health. I realized many health benefits before reaching my target weight. As an example, when I began exercising regularly, I actually gained weight, but that was a good thing, as it meant I was developing new muscle tissue, improving my overall health, and getting smaller in the meantime.
Dr. Singh, Emory Bariatric CenterResponse (Dr. Singh): That’s a great point Joe, many studies show that even as little as 5-10 percent of weight loss dramatically improves a person’s overall health.

Have you seen success with your weight loss efforts? Share your best tips with us and our readers in the comments below!

Related Resources: