non-surgical weight loss

Takeaways from Emory Bariatrics’ Successful & Lasting Weight Loss Live Chat

successful-weight-loss-cilThank you to everyone who joined us on Tuesday, August 11th, for our live online chat on “Successful & Lasting Weight Loss: Strategies for Reaching Your Goals”, hosted by Emory Bariatrics registered dieticians, Megan Moyer, RD, and Kasey LaPointe, RD.

For the millions of Americans who diet, stop dieting and then promise to diet again, the constant struggle to lose weight and keep it off can be exhausting, not to mention discouraging. During this live chat, Megan and Kasey discussed strategies for long term weight loss success. They offered healthful living tips to get you on the path to lasting weight loss and provided successful strategies to help make this time the one that leads to a healthier, happier lifestyle. Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What’s the best way to keep on track: daily weigh-ins? listening to tapes?

Meagan Moyer, RD: The best way to stay on track really depends on the person. Some people choose to weigh themselves everyday, but that can take a mental toll if they beat themselves up every time they step on the scale. That’s why I recommend not weighing yourself more than once a week. It’s also helpful to have a person you can call when you need support and in moments of “weakness.” Some people also choose to track what they eat using a website or app.

Question: Does eating before bedtime make you gain weight? What time should I stop?

Meagan Moyer, RD and Kasey LaPointe, RD: It’s a misconception that the metabolism stops at a certain time during the night. Usually the problem lies more with eating later in the night after your calories have been consumed for the day. Late night eating can be out of boredom or habit. One thing I suggest is asking yourself the reason you are eating, whether it’s out of boredom or actual hunger. Try to occupy your time with something else to keep you from snacking late at night. I keep a crossword puzzle next to my bed if I feel my mind wandering towards hunger.

Question: After months of steady weight loss, I feel like I might be at a plateau. My weight loss has been incredibly slow for the past few months. Any suggestions on how to adjust my diet to see better results?

Meagan Moyer, RD and Kasey LaPointe, RD: Reaching a plateau is completely normal when it comes to weight loss. The body gets used to your behaviors and habits, so it’s good to adjust your routine and diet. Try incorporating new activities into your work outs in order to continue to see results.

Also, while you may reach a plateau when it comes to the scale, the body often continues to change in other ways. Try to focus on other non-scale victories to measure your weight loss success. You can focus on how your clothes fit, seeing a decrease in inches using a tape measure, having more energy, sleeping better and other noticeable changes is a good way to measure your success.

Question: How do I know if I’m a candidate for Bariatric surgery?

Kasey LaPointe, RD: If your body mass index is greater than 40 or if your body mass index is greater than 35 and you have weight related health issues, you are a candidate for bariatric surgery. You also have to be ready to commit to a lifelong healthy lifestyle and be mentally prepared for these changes.

If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript. You can also visit emoryhealthcare.org/emorybariatrics for more information.

Also, if you have additional questions for our registered dieticians, Megan Moyer, RD, and Kasey LaPointe, RD, please feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

As it Turns Out, Apples May Keep More Than Just the Doctor Away

Apple a Day Keeps the Pounds AwayAmericans have a nasty habit of depriving ourselves when we want to drop pounds. We often believe that cutting calories is the secret to success, but we wind up just feeling hungry all the time. It may surprise you that one healthy alternative to the hopeless feeling of hunger is to actually add food to your diet. Evidence suggests that adding nutrient-dense, fiber-rich foods to your diet can actually help reduce your cravings. The secret? Fiber slows down the digestion of food, so you get a slow and steady source of glucose rather than ups and down in blood sugar levels.

Most Americans don’t get enough fiber. On average, we take in 15 grams a day of the 25 to 38 grams that are recommended, depending on your gender 1. So where do apples fit into all this? One apple with the skin on contains roughly 4.4 grams of fiber, about one fifth of your daily intake. Also, apples are rich in a very powerful kind of fiber called pectin, which is typically used as a gelling agent and stabilizer in food. It’s that stuff that they make jams and jellies out of. Pectin also is effective in delaying the emptying of the stomach by slowing the movement of food from your stomach into your small intestine, which works to discourage overeating and help you sustain that full feeling for a greater extent of time.

Still have your doubts? One study showed that substituting pectin for regular fiber doubled the time it took subjects’ stomachs to empty, keeping them full that much longer 2. In another study, scientists found that when participants ate an apple or a pear before meals they experienced weight loss 3. So, while it might seem counterintuitive, adding in those extra calories before meals can actually help you stay full for longer so that you resist those dangerous junk foods between meals!

But that’s not all. There is more to apples than just their awesome ability to keep us feeling full for longer. Apples provide many positive health benefits, specifically anti-cancer benefits. One report published in 2008 claimed that apple extracts and components have been shown to influence multiple mechanisms relevant for cancer prevention in in vitro studies. They also went on to say that epidemiological observations indicate that regular consumption of one or more apples a day may reduce the risk for lung and colon cancer 4.

Next time you’re looking around for something to eat, try grabbing an apple. By you’ve taken that last bite, you probably won’t be hungry anymore. You may just find that over time it helps you to become a slimmer, healthier you!

 Related Resources:

Slow & Steady Wins the Weight Loss Race

Along your weight loss path, how many times have you wished for a quick fix? While there’s no magic bullet, there are simple, steady steps you can take to meet your weight loss goal.

Joe Before & After Weight LossArvinpal Singh, MD, Medical Director of the Emory Bariatric Center, along with Joe, an Emory Bariatric Center patient on his own non-surgical weight loss journey, hosted an online chat discussing strategies for long term weight loss success. Dr. Singh and Joe answered questions on what it takes to get on the path to lasting weight loss and offered inspiration to help you reach your weight loss goals.

Joe and Dr. Singh fielded lots of great questions, ranging from inquiries on nonsurgical vs. surgical weight loss to those on fat fighting foods. Having already lost 115 pounds by making smart diet, exercise and lifestyle changes, Joe shared some of his best tips for successful weight loss.

You can find a few of the weight loss chat questions and answers below. For more, check out the full weight loss chat transcript!

Question:  “Is it better to exercise for a full 30 minute interval daily or to exercise a total of 30 minutes throughout the day?” – Deborah

Dr. Singh, Emory Bariatric Center

Answer (Dr. Singh): Excellent question! BOTH are equal, 10 minute increments 3 times a day has been shown to be just as effective as 30 minutes once a day. As a rule, every step you take counts. For example, park further away, take stairs and stay active in your daily. Also, try spending some time during your lunch break walking, etc.

 

Joe, Weight Loss PatientAnswer (Joe): To add to that, the key is making sure you’re upping your activity overall and upping the number of calories you’re burning. If doing that in two 15 minute intervals works better for you, that’s great, or 30 minutes at once is good too. Even small changes make a big impact and it’s important to be aware of little steps you can take to get extra activity in. I’ll try to walk to the water fountain that’s furthest away, as an example.

Question: “I’m 55 years old, diabetic, with blood pressure off the chart. How do I lose 90 lbs fast?” – Lynn

Dr. Singh, Emory Bariatric CenterAnswer (Dr. Singh): Hi Lynn, Losing the weight quickly is not necessarily as important as losing the weight in a healthy way. Without seeing you in person, I can’t speak your personal medical situation, but in general, eating the right amounts of the proper foods and making healthy lifestyle changes are the first steps. I can certainly go into more detail after looking into your personal medical history and discussing your case in detail with you.

Diseases of our western society (including heart disease, diabetes & cancers) are not a necessarily an inevitable part of the aging process. Many of these conditions are reversible and preventable with excellent nutrition and a healthy lifestyle.

Joe, Weight Loss PatientAnswer (Joe): Losing a certain number of pounds isn’t as important as it is to regain your overall health. I realized many health benefits before reaching my target weight. As an example, when I began exercising regularly, I actually gained weight, but that was a good thing, as it meant I was developing new muscle tissue, improving my overall health, and getting smaller in the meantime.
 
 
Dr. Singh, Emory Bariatric CenterResponse (Dr. Singh): That’s a great point Joe, many studies show that even as little as 5-10 percent of weight loss dramatically improves a person’s overall health.
 
 
 
 


Have you seen success with your weight loss efforts? Share your best tips with us and our readers in the comments below!

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Time to Lose the Weight, “Your Weigh”

Non-Surgical Weight Loss Your WeighLosing weight is something that seems to be high on the list of to-dos of most American adults. Whether you set a New Years resolution each year, or find yourself trying one diet after another, the ultimate goal is to lose weight and keep it off. Many of us don’t have enough weight to lose to justify weight loss surgery, but are looking for a long term solution. While diets can work for some people, most popular diets assume that everyone is overweight for the same reasons and can lose weight following the same plan. From years of experience, we know that this is not true. That’s why we’ve launched the Your Weigh program, which gives you the opportunity to work with a team of medical professionals to construct a tailored weight loss program that works for you.

Here are some real-world examples of how our different meal and weight loss plans have met the unique weight loss needs of our patients:

Elizabeth W. is a 54 year old woman who was recently diagnosed with diabetes by her doctor. She saw the diagnosis as a “wake up call” for her to start taking care of herself and her weight-related issues. Elizabeth knew that she needed to lose weight quickly, but also wanted to learn about how to eat healthy to help keep her blood sugar in control. When Elizabeth enrolled in Your Weigh, she met with a Registered Dietitian who suggested that she follow the partial meal replacement meal plan. In this plan, Elizabeth will use meal replacements in addition to healthy food choices that she prepares at home. This choice was best for her because it will ensure significant weight loss while practicing balanced meal planning and eating correct portion sizes of “regular” food.

Tony S. is a 33 year old man who started losing weight on his own by trying to eat better and exercising. Tony was losing a little weight, but not as much as he had hoped. Tony really liked working out, but needed help with food choices. He knew that his eating habits were keeping him from reaching his goals. When Tony signed up for the Your Weigh program he chose the full food meal plan, which consists of three balanced meals and two snacks throughout the day. Tony did very well on this plan and actually found that he had more energy for his workouts because he was eating more frequently. Tony has since reached his goal weight and continues to eat frequent, balanced meals and exercise to maintain his weight loss.

Christine H. is a 41 year old woman who has been on many diets in her lifetime. She feels like she has “tried them all”. She chose to follow the full meal replacement program because she wants to have a “temporary break from food.” After 12 weeks of eating only meal replacements, she is now aware of just how much food her body needs and uses that knowledge when she begins to eat food again. Christine continues to come to the clinic for on-going support, which she knows is the key to maintaining her weight loss.

For more information on our Your Weigh medical weight loss program, you can visit our Emory Bariatric Center site. If you have questions about our Your Weigh weight loss program, you can ask them using the comments section below.